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“Michelle (The Beatles) by JP McCartney”

“Michelle (The Beatles) by JP McCartney”
John Lennon invited McCartney over to college parties when he was still in high school, and French culture was a trend. Paul would try to fit in by sitting in a corner and pretending to be French. He would play little tunes in French, but he only knew a few French words so he would groan or make words up. John told him that he should make it into a real song for Rubber Soul, so he asked his friend Ivan Vaughan, whose wife was a French teacher, for a French name and some words to rhyme with it. Vaughan came up with “Michelle, ma belle.” McCartney came up with the next line, “These are words that go together well,” and Vaughan taught him the French translation, “Sont des mots qui vont tres bien ensemble,” which he used in the song as well. When he played it for Lennon, John suggested the “I love you” part in the middle.
This is not based on any particular woman. They chose the name because it sounded good.
None of The Beatles spoke French. They picked up some German when they went there in 1962, but no French.
This won a Grammy in 1966 for Song of the Year, one of just four Grammys The Beatles won while they were still active.
In France, this went to #1.
McCartney mailed a check to Ivan Vaughn’s wife, Jan, for helping with the French lyrics.
The French verse is often misheard as “Sunday monkey won’t play piano song.”
Paul McCartney said in Observer Music MonthlyOctober 2007: “We used to go to these art school parties because John was at art school and me and George were at the school next door, which is now a performing arts school. John was that little bit older than us, which at that age is impressive. He was a year-and-a-half older than me and you really look up to people like that. But it’s funny because I don’t think I had that same feeling with Ringo, who I think was a few months older than John. John was a pretty impressive cat – being a year-and-a-half older and going to art school, all that was a pretty cool combination for us. So we’d tag along to these parties, and it was at the time of people like Juliette Greco, the French bohemian thing. They’d all wear black turtleneck sweaters, it’s kind of where we got all that from, and we fancied Juliette like mad. Have you ever seen her? Dark hair, real chanteuse, really happening. So I used to pretend to be French, and I had this song that turned out later to be ‘Michelle.’ It was just an instrumental, but years later John said: ‘You remember that thing you wrote about the French?’ I said: ‘Yeah.’ He said: ‘That wasn’t a bad song, that. You should do that, y’know.'”
The singer-songwriter Michelle Branch was named after this song. >>
Encouraged by the successful foray into French on this song, Beatles ami Donovan sang a verse of his 1968 hit “Jennifer Juniper” in French.

Source: michelle my girl beatle song facts

 
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Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-05-15T17:10:11+00:00America/Los_Angeles05bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 15 May 2018 17:10:11 +0000 31, in 1960s, music, uk

 

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“The Beatles – COME TOGETHER”

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“Come Together” is a song by the Beatles written by John Lennon[1] but credited to Lennon–McCartney. The song is the opening track on the album Abbey Road and was released as a double A-sided single with “Something”, their 21st single in the United Kingdom and 26th in the United States. The song reached the top of the charts in the US[2] and peaked at number four in the UK.[3]

Origin and meaning

The song’s history began when Lennon was inspired by Timothy Leary’s campaign for governor of California against Ronald Reagan, which promptly ended when Leary was sent to prison for possession of marijuana:[4]

The thing was created in the studio. It’s gobbledygook; Come Together was an expression that Leary had come up with for his attempt at being president or whatever he wanted to be, and he asked me to write a campaign song. I tried and tried, but I couldn’t come up with one. But I came up with this, Come Together, which would’ve been no good to him – you couldn’t have a campaign song like that, right?[5]

It has been speculated[by whom?] that each verse refers cryptically to one of the Beatles.[6][unreliable source?][7][unreliable source?] It has also been suggested that the song has only a single “pariah-like protagonist” and Lennon was “painting another sardonic self-portrait”.[8]

Recording

Lennon played rhythm guitar and sang the vocal, McCartney played bass, Harrison played lead guitar, and Starr played drums. It was produced by George Martin and recorded at the end of July 1969 at Abbey Road Studios.[9] In the intro, Lennon says: “shoot me”, which is accompanied by his handclaps and McCartney’s heavy bass riff.[9] The famous Beatles’ “walrus” from “I Am the Walrus” and “Glass Onion” returns in the line “he got walrus gumboot”, followed by “he got Ono sideboard”. Bluesman Muddy Waters is also mentioned in the song.

Music critic Ian MacDonald reports that McCartney sang a backing vocal,[10] but recording engineer Geoff Emerick said that Lennon did all the vocals himself, and when a frustrated McCartney asked Lennon, “What do you want me to do on this track, John?”, Lennon replied, “Don’t worry, I’ll do the overdubs on this.”[11]

In a 1970 interview in the Evening Standard, McCartney said he was disappointed about not singing live with Lennon; instead, he overdubbed his vocals later:

Even on Abbey Road we don’t do harmonies like we used to. I think it’s sad. On “Come Together” I would have liked to sing harmony with John, and I think he would have liked me to, but I was too embarrassed to ask him, and I don’t work to the best of my abilities in that situation.[12]

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Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-05-15T10:50:10+00:00America/Los_Angeles05bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 15 May 2018 10:50:10 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music, coffee, music

 

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“The Beatles – Long and Winding Road (1970)”

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The Long and Winding Road” is a ballad written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) from the Beatles’ album Let It Be. It became the group’s 20th and last number-one song in the United States in June 1970,[2] and was the last single released by the quartet.

While the released version of the song was very successful, the post-production modifications by producer Phil Spector angered McCartney to the point that when he made his case in court for breaking up the Beatles as a legal entity, he cited the treatment of “The Long and Winding Road” as one of six reasons for doing so. New versions of the song with simpler instrumentation were subsequently released by both the Beatles and McCartney.

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“The Beatles – Hey Jude”

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“Hey Jude”

is a song by the English rock band

the Beatles,

written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. The ballad evolved from “Hey Jules”, a song McCartney wrote to comfort John Lennon’s son, Julian, during his parents’ divorce. “Hey Jude” begins with a verse-bridge structure incorporating McCartney’s vocal performance and piano accompaniment; further instrumentation is added as the song progresses. After the fourth verse, the song shifts to a fade-out coda that lasts for more than four minutes.

Hey Jude” was released in August 1968 as the first single from the Beatles‘ record label Apple Records. More than seven minutes in length, it was at the time the longest single ever to top the British charts.[1] It also spent nine weeks at number one in the United States, the longest for any Beatles single. “Hey Jude” tied the “all-time” record, at the time, for the longest run at the top of the US charts. The single has sold approximately eight million copies and is frequently included on professional critics’ lists of the greatest songs of all time. In 2013, Billboard named it the 10th biggest song of all time.[2]

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-03-01T10:05:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles03bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 01 Mar 2018 10:05:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music, coffee, entertainment, male vocal group, music, r&b

 

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“The Beatles: Yesterday lyrics”

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Yesterday

” is a song by English rock band

the Beatles

written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) first released on the album Help! in the United Kingdom in August 1965.

Yesterday

“, with the B-side “Act Naturally”, was released as a single in the United States in September 1965. While it topped the American chart in October the song also hit the British top 10 in a cover version by Matt Monro. The song also appeared on the UK EP “Yesterday” in March 1966 and the Beatles’ US album Yesterday and Today released in June 1966.

McCartney’s vocal and acoustic guitar, together with a string quartet, essentially made for the first solo performance of the band. It remains popular today with more than 2,200 cover versions[3] and is one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music.[note 1]”Yesterday” was voted the best song of the 20th century in a 1999 BBC Radio 2 poll of music experts and listeners and was also voted the No. 1 pop song of all time by MTV and Rolling Stone magazine the following year. In 1997, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone.

Yesterday

” is a melancholy ballad about the break-up of a relationship. McCartney is the only member of

the Beatles

to appear on the recording. The final recording was so different from other works by the Beatles that the band members vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom. However, it was issued as a single in the US in September 1965 and later released as a single in the UK in 1976.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-03-01T09:17:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles03bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 01 Mar 2018 09:17:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, coffee, entertainment, male vocal group, male vocalist, music

 

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“The Beatles – Revolution”

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“Revolution” is a song by the Beatles, written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. Two versions of the song were recorded in 1968: a hard rock version, released as the B-side of the “Hey Jude” single, and a slower, bluesier arrangement (titled “Revolution 1”) for the Beatles’ self-titled double album, commonly known as “the White Album”. Although the single version was issued first, it was recorded several weeks after “Revolution 1”, as a re-make specifically intended for release as a single. A third connected piece, written by Lennon, is the experimental track “Revolution 9”, which evolved from an unused, spoken-word portion of “Revolution 1”, and which also appears on the White Album.

Inspired by political protests in early 1968, Lennon’s lyrics expressed doubt in regard to some of the tactics. When the single version was released in August, the political left viewed it as betraying their cause. The release of the album version in November indicated Lennon’s uncertainty about destructive change, with the phrase “count me out” recorded differently as “count me out, in”. In 1987, the song became the first Beatles recording to be licensed for a television commercial, which prompted a lawsuit from the surviving members of the group.

In the same year Nina Simone recorded her single Revolution with some structural similarities (some lyrics are also the same) to the Beatles’ song, but credited to her and Weldon Irvine.

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“The Beatles Penny Lane”

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“Penny Lane” is a song by The Beatles.[5] It was written by Paul McCartney but credited to the Lennon–McCartney songwriting partnership. The song was created in response to John Lennon’s “Strawberry Fields Forever”, and its lyrics refer to a real street in Liverpool, England.

Recorded during the Sgt. Pepper sessions, “Penny Lane” was released in February 1967 as one side of a double A-sided single, along with “Strawberry Fields Forever”. The single was the result of the record company wanting a new release after several months of no new Beatles releases. Although the song did not top the charts in Britain, it was still a top ten hit across Europe. The song was later included on the band’s US album, Magical Mystery Tour, despite not appearing on the British double EP of the same name.

In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked “Penny Lane” at number 456 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[6]

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