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 Ray Charles “Busted”

“Busted” is a song covered by Johnny Cash (with The Carter Family) for Cash’s 1963 album Blood, Sweat and Tears. “Busted” was written by Harlan Howard in 1962, and has been covered by several notable artists, including Ray Charles (also in 1963) and Patty Loveless (2009).

The song is about a dirt-poor farmer struggling to support his family, bemoaning a stack of bills, his family’s needs, animals that won’t produce and land that is barren. He even tries to ask his brother for assistance, but his brother was actually going to come to him for help. Finally, he admits he’s going to pack up his family and leave to find a better life.

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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in blues, r&b

 

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Ray Charles – Georgia On My Mind

Ray Charles – Georgia On My Mind

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“Georgia on My Mind” is a 1930 song written by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell and first recorded that year. It has often been associated with Ray Charles, a native of Georgia who recorded it for his 1960 album The Genius Hits the Road. In 1979 Georgia designated this as the official state song.

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Five different versions of this song have made the US Hot 100. Here the four that came after Charles’ recording: Righteous Brothers (#62, 1966) Georgia Pines Candymen (#81, 1967) Wes Montgomery (#91, 1968) Willie Nelson (#84, 1978) Michael Bolton (#36, 1990).

On April 24, 1979, this became the official state song of Georgia, replacing a song title “Georgia.” Ray Charles performed the song the ceremony that day, where it was decreed: The song “Georgia on My Mind,” with lyrics by Mr. Stuart Gorrell and music by Mr. Hoagy Carmichael, has an enduring quality that has made it one of the best loved songs in America for many years. Although “Georgia on My Mind” describes a Georgian’s love for his state, its beautiful melody and lyrics have given the song a worldwide appeal. “Georgia on My Mind” has been recorded by many outstanding artists, but the rendition by Mr. Ray Charles, a native Georgian, which was first recorded in 1958, has been greatly enjoyed by music lovers throughout the world. It is appropriate that the official State song should be a beautiful song that has wide appeal throughout the country, and “Georgia on My Mind” is an outstanding example of these qualities.

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“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

I Got a Woman” (originally titled “I’ve Got a Woman“) is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray CharlesAtlantic Records released the song as a single in December 1954, with “Come Back Baby” as the B-side. Both songs later appeared on the 1957 album Ray Charles(subsequently reissued as Hallelujah I Love Her So).


The song was recorded in late 1954 in the Atlanta studios of Georgia Tech radio station WGST. It was a hit—Charles’ first—climbing quickly to #1 R&B in January 1955.[3] Charles told the Pop Chronicles that he performed this song for about a year before he recorded it on November 18, 1954.[4]The song would lead to more hits for Charles during this period when he was with Atlantic. It was later ranked No. 239 on Rolling Stones list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, one of Charles’ five songs on the list.[5] A re-recorded version by Ray Charles, entitled “I Gotta Woman” (ABC-Paramount10649) reached No. 79 on the Billboardpop chart in 1965.[6]

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Posted by on August 14, 2017 in 1950s, 1960s, blues, classic music, music

 

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Ray Charles – “Unchain My Heart”  

Ray Charles – “Unchain My Heart”  

Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004), professionally known as Ray Charles, was an American singer, songwriter, musician and composer, who is sometimes referred to as “The Genius”.

He pioneered the genre of soul music during the 1950s by combining rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic Records.He also contributed to the racial integration of country and pop music during the 1960s with his crossover success on ABC Records, most notably with his two Modern Sounds albums.While he was with ABC, Charles became one of the first African-American musicians to be granted artistic control by a mainstream record company.

Charles was blind from the age of seven. Charles cited Nat King Cole as a primary influence, but his music was also influenced by jazz, blues, rhythm and blues, and country artists of the day, including Art Tatum, Louis Jordan, Charles Brown and Louis Armstrong. Charles’ playing reflected influences from country blues, barrelhouse and stride piano styles. He had strong ties to Quincy Jones, who often cared for him and showed him the ropes of the “music club industry.”

Frank Sinatra called him “the only true genius in show business”, although Charles downplayed this notion.

In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked Charles at number ten on their list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”,[ and number two on their November 2008 list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”.Billy Joel observed: “This may sound like sacrilege, but I think Ray Charles was more important than Elvis Presley”.

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“Ray Charles You Don’t Know Me”

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You Don’t Know Me

” is a song written by Cindy Walker based on a title and storyline given to her by Eddy Arnold in 1955. “You Don’t Know Me” was first recorded by Arnold that year and released as a single on April 21, 1956 on RCA Victor.[1] The first version of the song to make the Billboard charts was by Jerry Vale in 1956, peaking at #14 on the pop chart. Arnold’s version charted two months later, released as an RCA Victor single, 47-6502, backed with “The Rockin’ Mockin’ Bird”, which reached #10 on the Billboard country chart. Cash Box magazine, which combined all best-selling versions at one position, included a version by Carmen McRae that never appeared in the Billboard Top 100 Sides listing.

Notable recorded versions

The best-selling version of the song is by

Ray Charles,

who took it to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1962, after releasing the song on his #1 album Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music. This version also topped the “Easy listening” chart for three weeks in 1962, and was used in the 1993 comedy film Groundhog Day. The song was the twelfth number one country hit for Mickey Gilley in 1981.[3]

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