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“Joe Cocker – Cry Me A River”

Mad Dogs & Englishmen is a live album by Joe Cocker released in 1970. The album’s title is drawn from the 1931 Noël Coward song of the same name. Only four songs of the 16 on the original album were drawn from his first two studio albums. Besides the contributions of bandmate and musical director Leon Russell, it draws equally from rock (the Rolling Stones, Traffic, Bob Dylan, the Beatles) and soul (Ray Charles, Sam and Dave, Otis Redding). Accompanying Cocker is a choir, a three-piece horn section and several drummers.

The single “The Letter”/”Space Captain”, recorded during rehearsals was released to coincide with the tour. The album yielded the single “Cry Me a River“/”Give Peace a Chance.”

 

 
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Posted by on May 29, 2017 in blues, male vocalist

 

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“Joe Cocker – You Are So Beautiful (Official Video) HD”


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“You Are So Beautiful” is a song written by Billy Preston and Bruce Fisher. Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys contributed to the song’s genesis, but his official credit was omitted. It was first recorded by Preston and made popular by Joe Cocker. Preston who grew up playing the organ in church, originally wrote the lyrics about God.[citation needed]

Preston’s original version first appeared on his 1974 album The Kids & Me and as the B-side on the 45rpm pressing of his pop hit, “Struttin'”. Cocker’s producer, Jim Price, created a slowed-down arrangement for Cocker’s version, which first appeared on the album, I Can Stand a Little Rain (released later in 1974). Released as a single, the Joe Cocker version reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1975 and helped the album become a hit. It would be his biggest hit until his duet with Jennifer Warnes, “Up Where We Belong”, which reached #1 in 1982.

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“Joe Cocker – St . James Infirmary” 

St. James Infirmary Blues“, sometimes known as “Gambler’s Blues,” is an American folksong of anonymous origin, though sometimes credited to the songwriter Joe Primrose (a pseudonym for Irving Mills). Louis Armstrong made it famous in his influential 1928 recording.  The song was first recorded (as “Gambler’s Blues”) in 1927 by Fess Williams and his Royal Flush Orchestra.[7] This version mentions an infirmary, but not by name. The song was popular during the jazz era, and by 1930 at least eighteen different versions had been released by various artists.[8]The Duke Ellington Orchestra recorded the song multiple times using pseudonyms such as “The Ten Black Berries”, “The Harlem Hot Chocolates” and “The Jungle Band”,[9] whilst Cab Calloway performs a version in the 1933 Betty Boop animated film Snow White, providing both vocals and dance moves for Koko the clown.[10]

In 1945, while serving with the U.S. Army in Germany, Tony Bennett recorded a version with his division’s military band. This was the very first studio recording Bennett ever did.

In 1956, Scatman Crothers released a version of “St. James Infirmary” as the fifth track of his album, Rock ‘N’ Roll With “Scat Man.[11]

In 1959, Snooks Eaglin recorded a version of “St. James Infirmary” for the Folkways Records album “New Orleans Street Singer”.[12]

In 1961, Bobby “Blue” Bland released a version of “Saint James Infirmary” on the flip side of his No. 2 R&B hit “Don’t Cry No More” (Duke 340) and included it in his album Two Steps From The Blues.[13][14]

In 1963, Lou Rawls featured the song on his Capitol album, Back and Blue.[15]

In 1965, Appalachian banjo player Dock Boggs recorded a version of the song entitled “Old Joe’s Barroom”.[16]

In 1968, Eric Burdon and the Animals released a version on their album “Every One of Us“.[17]

In November 1972, Joe Cocker published the album Joe Cocker (also billed as Something to Say) where appears this song performed live.[18]

In 1981, Bob Dylan adapted the song when he wrote and recorded “Blind Willie McTell.” The song was written for his 1981 release, Infidels, but was not released until The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991 (Columbia, 1991). Source: Song and Dance Man III: The Art of Bob Dylan, Michael Gray (Continuum, 2000), pp. 517-547.

Canadian Brass created a nostalgic version of this on their Basin Street CD recorded for Sony/CBS in 1984.[19]

The James Solberg Band recorded a ‘blues’ version on their 1995 CD on the Atomic Theory label See That My Grave Is Kept Clean.[20]

In 2006 The Devil Makes Three, covered the song on the album, A Little Bit Faster And A Little Bit Worse (under the title St James).[21]

More recently, The White Stripes covered the song on their self-titled debut album, and Jack White says he and fellow band member, Meg White, were introduced to the song from a Betty Boop cartoon.[22]

Isobel Campbell has also recorded a version of the song.[23] In 2002 Jorma Kaukonen did a version for his Blue Country Heart album, on which he titled the song “Those Gambler’s Blues”, and erroneously credited it to Jimmie Rodgers.

In February 2012, Trombone Shorty and Booker T. Jones performed an instrumental version as the opening number of the “Red, White, and Blues” concert at the White House.[24]

The song appears on Rickie Lee Jones‘ album, The Devil You Know.[25]

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Posted by on April 10, 2017 in blues, classic music, music

 

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“Joe Cocker – Bye Bye Blackbird”

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John Robert “Joe” Cocker, OBE (20 May 1944 – 22 December 2014) was an English singer and musician. He was known for his gritty voice, spasmodic body movement in performance, and definitive versions of popular songs.

Cocker’s cover of the Beatles’ “With a Little Help from My Friends” reached number one in the UK in 1968. He performed the song live at Woodstock in 1969, and at the Party at the Palace concert for the Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2002. His version also became the theme song for the TV series The Wonder Years. His 1974 cover of “You Are So Beautiful”, reached number five in the US. Cocker was the recipient of several awards, including a 1983 Grammy Award for his US number one “Up Where We Belong”, a duet with Jennifer Warnes.

In 1993 Cocker was nominated for the Brit Award for Best British Male, in 2007 was awarded a bronze Sheffield Legends plaque in his hometown, and in 2008 he received an OBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music. Cocker was ranked number 97 on Rolling Stone’s 100 greatest singers list.

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Posted by on September 5, 2016 in coffee, entertainment, music, r&b

 

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