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“MARGARITAVILLE”  JIMMY BUFFETT 

1977 Italian single picture sleeve

150px-margarita.jpg

A margarita cocktail: the inspiration for “Margaritaville”

“Margaritaville” is a 1977 song by American popular music singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett from the album Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes. This song was written about a drink Buffett discovered at Lung’s Cocina del Sur restaurant on Anderson Lane in Austin, Texas,[3] and the first huge surge of tourists who descended on Key West, Florida around that time. He wrote most of the song that night at a friend’s house in Austin, and finished it while spending time in Key West. In the United States “Margaritaville” reached number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and went to number one on the Easy Listening chart,[4] also peaking at #13 on the Hot Country Songs chart.[5] Billboard ranked it number 14 on its 1977 Pop Singles year-end chart.[6] It remains Buffett’s highest charting solo single.

Named for the cocktail margarita, with lyrics reflecting a laid-back lifestyle in a tropical climate, “Margaritaville” has come to define Buffett’s music and career. The relative importance of the song to Buffett’s career is referred to obliquely in a parenthetical plural in the title of a Buffett greatest hits compilation album, Songs You Know By Heart: Jimmy Buffett’s Greatest Hit(s). The name has been used in the title of other Buffett compilation albums such as Meet Me In Margaritaville: The Ultimate Collection and is also the name of several commercial products licensed by Buffett (see below). Popular culture references, throughout the years and remakes attest to the song’s continuing popularity. The song was mentioned in Blake Shelton’s 2004 single “Some Beach”.

“Margaritaville” has been inducted into the 2016 Grammy Hall of Fame for its cultural and historic significance.[7]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in male vocalist, music

 

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Columbian: Torta de Café (Coffee Flavored Cake) and more

Columbian: Torta de Café (Coffee Flavored Cake) and more


Torta de Manzana (Colombian-Style Apple Cake)  image:  Pinterest.com

For most Colombians, no day begins without coffee (cafecito), while no meal ends without it, and it’s offered to guests any time of the day. We drink it black or with milk, the latter we call ‘café con leche’. I can’t imagine starting a day without coffee! I love just about any food and drink with coffee flavor. In Colombia, we often use coffee to make traditional desserts, cocktails and savory dishes.


http://www.mycolombianrecipes.com/torta-de-cafe-coffee-flavored-cake

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, Monday Madness

 

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“THE KINKS – LOLA”

Singles from Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One
“Lola”
Released: 12 June 1970
“Apeman”

Released: 20 November 1970
Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One, commonly abbreviated to Lola Versus Powerman, or just Lola, is the eighth studio album by British rock band the Kinks, recorded and released in 1970.[1] A concept album, it is a satirical appraisal of the music industry, including song publishers, unions, the press, accountants, business managers, and life on the road.[1] Musically Lola Versus Powerman is varied, described by Stephen Thomas Erlewine as “a wildly unfocused but nonetheless dazzling tour de force”, containing some of Ray Davies’ strongest songs.[1]

Although it appeared during a transitional period for the Kinks, Lola Versus Powerman was a success both critically and commercially for the group, charting in the Top 40 in America[2] and helping restore them in the public eye, making it a “comeback” album. It contained two hit singles: “Lola”, which reached the top 10 in the US and UK, and “Apeman”, which peaked at number five in the UK.[2]

Background and recording Edit

The Kinks, around the time of the recording of Lola Versus Powerman: from left – John Gosling, Dave Davies, Mick Avory, John Dalton, Ray Davies
The Kinks ban by the American Federation of Musicians on performing in America, which had been in force since 1965,[3][4] was lifted in 1969, so the group’s management arranged a North American tour.[5] However, members of the band fell ill, and the tour was shuffled,[5] resulting in the band playing only a few dates in America and Canada.[5] A follow-up tour in 1970 met with similar results, with the group performing at only a select number of venues, with many dates cancelled.[6] The down time between the tours allowed Ray Davies, lead singer and songwriter of the group, to develop the band’s next single, “Lola”.[7]

The Kinks returned to England to start work on their new LP in spring 1970.[8] The group used Morgan Studios, an independent studio in Willesden, London, which was a change for them.[8] They would continue recording their albums there until Preservation, when they switched to their newly purchased studio, Konk.[7] Recording began in late April/early May.[8] Some of the first songs recorded were “Lola”, the outtake “The Good Life”, “Powerman” and “Got to Be Free”.[8] The sessions for “Lola” were especially long, and the recording continued into late May. Davies would recall later how he achieved the signature clangy sound at the beginning of the track:

A National Steel resonator guitar
“ “I remember going into a music store on Shaftesbury Avenue in London when we were about to make ‘Lola’. I said, ‘I want to get a really good guitar sound on this record. I want a Martin.’ And in the corner they had this old 1938 dobro [resonator guitar, in this case a National Steel] that I bought for $150. I put them together on ‘Lola’ which is what makes that clangy sound: the combination of the Martin and the dobro with heavy compression.”[8] ”
The National Steel would play an integral part in many Kinks projects after that. In the 1972 song “Supersonic Rocket Ship”, Ray Davies would use the guitar to create a Caribbean feel for the record. Davies would play it on numerous Top of The Pops appearances, and it would be featured in several music videos the Kinks made in the future, including “Scattered” in 1992.[9]

Keyboardist John Gosling was added to the Kinks’ lineup in May.[10] He auditioned on the final backing master track for “Lola”, and was hired soon after. He was initially taken on solely for their upcoming US tour, but his post evolved into a more permanent position soon after. Gosling would remain with the band until 1977, departing after the release of Sleepwalker.[8] Dubbing for “Lola” was finished in June.[11] Recording for the LP was completed by October, and it was mixed throughout the remainder of the month.[12] Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One was released on 27 November 1970.

For “Lola”, Ray Davies overdubed the trademarked word “Coca-Cola” with the generic “cherry-cola” for the mono single release, as product placement rules meant the BBC (being a public service broadcaster) would not have played it.[11] The lyrics in the gatefold sleeve of the original LP use the “cherry-cola” line, though the album track contains the original stereo “Coca-Cola” version. A similar situation was encountered with the song “Apeman”, concerning the line “the air pollution is a-foggin’ up my eyes”.[11] “Fogging” was mistaken for “fucking”, and consequently Ray Davies had to re-record this line prior to its single release.[11]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

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Columbia Traditional Music… Feel The Rhythm! 

Columbia Traditional Music… Feel The Rhythm! 

YouTube featured image: (1984) Romancing The Stone Scene (Cartegena Columbia)

Traditional Colombian music can be divided into four distinct zones:

The Atlantic (Caribbean) coast , the Pacific coast , the Andean region, and the Eastern Plains.  

Caribbean (Atlantic) music pulsates with vibrant rhythms, such as cumbia, porro and mapalé.   The cumbia is mainly accompanied by an instrument called guacharaca. 

The music from the Pacific coast, such as the currulao with its strong use of drums, is touched  by Spanish influence.

The Colombian Andean music has been influenced by Spanish rhythms

Among typical examples are the bambuco, pasillo guabina and torbellino, played with stringed instruments such as the tiple or guitar, as well as piano.

The Andean music of Colombia differs noticeably from that of Peru, Ecuador or Bolivia.

The music of the Eastern Plains, “Los Llanos – música llanera”, is usually accompanied by a harp, a cuatro (a type of four-stringed guitar) and maracas.

Apart from these traditional forms, two musical rhythms have conquered large parts of the country. These are “la salsa” which has spread throughout the country, with Cali considered as the capital of la salsa, and the “vallenato”, which originated in La Guajira and Cesar in the northern part of the Caribbean coast.  The vallenato rhythm is mainly played by the vallenato accordion (buttons accordion) and other instruments.


http://www.colombia-sa.com/musica/musica-in.html


 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in Monday Madness, music

 

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“Neil Young – Heart of Gold”

“Neil Young – Heart of Gold” on YouTube

image

Neil Young: Heart of Gold is a 2006 documentary and concert film by Jonathan Demme, featuring Neil Young. The film was made in the summer of 2005 in Nashville, Tennessee, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, and was released to theaters on February 10, 2006. The film documents Young’s premiere of his songs from his album Prairie Wind at the Ryman Auditorium.

Overview

The film opens with interviews with Young and most of his band, which includes Emmylou Harris, Young’s wife Pegi Young, steel guitarist Ben Keith, and keyboardist Spooner Oldham. They and the other band members describe the concert and the making of Prairie Wind. The recording of the album and the filming of the concert occurred just before and after Young’s surgery to correct a cerebral aneurysm, and just a few months after the death of Young’s father Scott Young.

The first half of the concert consists entirely of songs from Prairie Wind, and the second half consists of acoustic songs from throughout Young’s career. Young describes the inspiration behind several of his songs.

en.m.Wikipedia,org

 
 

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COLUMBIAN BREAKFAST:  How To Make Calentado or Calentao – Sweet y Salado” 

image:  mycolumbianbreakfast.com


 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in Monday Madness

 

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“Colombian Coffee, Bogota, Colombia” 

“Colombian Coffee, Bogota, Colombia” 

featured image:  http://steamykitchen.com


Coffees from the Americas : Colombia

Colombia is the paradox of the specialty coffee world. Its 100% Colombia campaign, featuring the ubiquitous Juan Valdez, is a model of successful coffee organization and marketing. Colombia remains the only premium single origin coffee able to compete successfully in the arena of canned supermarket blends. Although it ranks second to Brazil in total coffee production — with about 12 percent of the world’s total coffee production compared to Brazil’s 30 to 35 percent — most of Colombia’s 12 percent is excellent coffee, grown at high altitudes on small peasant holdings, carefully picked, and wet-processed. The Colombia Federation of Coffee Growers ranks among the world’s most thorough-going and successful efforts at organizing and supporting small-holder coffee farmers.

Nevertheless, for most specialty coffee aficionados and professionals Juan Valdez is Rodney Dangerfield’s Latin cousin. Colombias carry nowhere near the insider panache of the coffees of Kenya, Guatemala, even of Papua New Guinea and Zimbabwe. Colombia sells well in specialty stores only because it is the sole name on the menu that coffee neophytes recognize.

It would appear that Colombia’s remarkable success at producing large and consistent enough quantities of decent quality coffee to position it at the top of the commercial market has doomed it as an elite origin. The Colombia Coffee Federation has evolved a system wherein hundreds of thousands of small producers wet-process their coffee on or close to their farms, and deliver it to collection points and eventually to mills operated by the Federation, where the coffee is sorted and graded according to rigorous national standards. There is an inherent leveling effect in such an arrangement. One farmer’s wet processing and microclimate may be exceptional and another’s may be mediocre, but both end up mixed in the same vast sea of coffee bags in which the only discriminations are the broad ones imposed by grading criteria. The regional origins famous in the earlier part of the 20th century — names like Armenia, Manizales, Medellin — are now lost in a well-organized but faceless coffee machine.

read more:

http://www.coffeereview.com/coffee-reference/coffee-categories/geographic-origins/coffees-from-the-americas/colombia/


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYv2M_Y2PBA&feature=youtube_gdata_player

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in coffee, Monday Madness

 

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