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Do You Know Where You’re Going To – Diana Ross

Do You Know Where You’re Going To – Diana Ross

“Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To)” is a song written by Michael Masser and Gerry Goffin, and initially recorded by American singer Thelma Houston in 1973, and then most notably by Diana Ross as the theme to the 1975 film Mahogany. source

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T10:06:01+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 10:06:01 +0000 31, in 1970s, female vocalist

 

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Heaven Have Mercy (Misericorde) Lyrics

Heaven Have Mercy (Misericorde) a song by Édith Piaf

At age 17 Piaf had a daughter, Marcelle, who died aged two. Piaf neither wanted nor had other children.

The love of Piaf’s life, the married boxer Marcel Cerdan, died in a plane crash in October 1949, while flying from Paris to New York City to meet her. Cerdan’s Air France flight, on a Lockheed Constellation, crashed in the Azores, killing everyone on board, including noted violinist Ginette Neveu.[31] Piaf and Cerdan’s affair made international headlines,[5] as Cerdan was the former middleweight world champion and a legend in France in his own right.

In 1951, Piaf was seriously injured in a car crash along with Charles Aznavour, breaking her arm and two ribs, and thereafter had serious difficulties arising from morphine and alcohol addictions.[1] Two more near-fatal car crashes exacerbated the situation.[7] Jacques Pills, a singer, took her into rehabilitation on three different occasions to no avail.[1]

Piaf married Jacques Pills (real name René Ducos), her first husband, in 1952 (her matron of honour was Marlene Dietrich) and divorced him in 1957. In 1962, she wed Théo Sarapo (Theophanis Lamboukas), a Greek hairdresser-turned-singer and actor[1] who was 20 years her junior. The couple sang together in some of her last engagements.

Piaf lived mainly in Belleville, Paris, with her father from 1915 to 1931. From 1934 to 1941, she lived at 45 rue de Chézy in Neuilly-sur-Seine; she lived alone from 1941 to 1952 and with Jacques Pills from 1952 to 1956. She continued to live there alone from 1956 to 1959. In her final years she lived at 23 rue Édouard Nortier in Neuilly-sur-Seine – alone from 1959 to 1962 and with Théo Sarapo from 1962 until her death in 1963.

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:51:27+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:51:27 +0000 31, in reflections

 

“The Boy from New York City” – The Ad Libs

“The Boy from New York City” – The Ad Libs

The Ad Libs were an American vocal group from Bayonne, New Jersey, United States, primarily active during the early 1960s. Featuring their characteristic female lead vocals with male “doo-wop” backing, their 1965 single “The Boy from New York City”,p written by George Davis and John T. Taylor, was their only Billboard Hot 100 hit. source

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:51:24+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:51:24 +0000 31, in black music artists, classic music

 

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“Taken In” – by Mike The Mechanics

“Taken In” – by Mike The Mechanics

Taken In” is a song performed by Mike + The Mechanics. Written by guitarist Mike Rutherford and producer Christopher Neil, it was the third single released in June 1986 from their 1985 self-titled debut album, and the third to become a Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:50:36+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:50:36 +0000 31, in rock

 

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DONNA SUMMER – MACARTHUR PARK

Labels:
Oasis Casablanca Geffen Atlantic Mercury WEA Epic Burgundy United Artists

Associated acts

Giorgio Moroder Brooklyn Dreams Paul Jabara Bruce Sudano Barbra Streisand Quincy Jones Bruce Springsteen David Foster Michael Omartian Matthew Ward Harold Faltermeyer Mickey Thomas Stock Aitken Waterman Liza Minnelli Bruce Roberts Darwin Hobbs Ziggy Marley

LaDonna Adrian Gaines (December 31, 1948 – May 17, 2012), known by her stage name Donna Summer, was an American singer, songwriter, painter, and actress. She gained prominence during the disco era of the late-1970s. A five-time Grammy Award winner, she was the first artist to have three consecutive double albums reach No. 1 on the United States Billboard 200 chart and charted four number-one singles in the U.S. within a 12-month period. Summer has reportedly sold over 140 million records[citation needed], making her one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time. She also charted two number-one singles on the R&B charts in the U.S. and one number-one in the U.K.
Summer earned a total of 32 hit singles on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in her lifetime, with 14 of those reaching the top ten. She claimed a top 40 hit every year between 1975 and 1984, and from her first top ten hit in 1976, to the end of 1982, she had 12 top ten hits;(10 were top five hits) more than any other act. She returned to the Hot 100’s top five in 1983, and claimed her final top ten hit in 1989 with “This Time I Know It’s for Real”. Her most recent Hot 100 hit came in 1999 with “I Will Go With You (Con Te Partiro)”. While her fortunes on the Hot 100 waned through those decades, Summer remained a force on the U.S. Dance/Club Play Songs chart over her entire career.
While influenced by the counterculture of the 1960s, she became the front singer of a psychedelic rock band named Crow and moved to New York City. Joining a touring version of the musical Hair, she left New York and spent several years living, acting, and singing in Europe, where she met music producers Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellotte.

Summer returned to the U.S., in 1975 after the commercial success of the song “Love to Love You Baby”, which was followed by a string of other hits, such as “I Feel Love”, “Last Dance”, “MacArthur Park”, “Heaven Knows”, “Hot Stuff”, “Bad Girls”, “Dim All the Lights”, “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” (duet with Barbra Streisand), and “On the Radio”. She became known as the “Queen of Disco”, while her music gained a global following.
Summer died on May 17, 2012, at her home in Naples, Florida.

In her obituary in The Times, she was described as the “undisputed queen of the Seventies disco boom” who reached the status of “one of the world’s leading female singers.”Giorgio Moroder described Summer’s work with him on the song “I Feel Love” as “really the start of electronic dance” music. In 2013, Summer was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:44:19+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:44:19 +0000 31, in 1970s, black music artists, female vocalist, music

 

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Edith Piaf – Hymn To Love (Hymne à l’amour)

The lyrics were written by Piaf and the music by Marguerite Monnot. Piaf first sang this song at the Cabaret Versailles in New York City on September 14, 1949.[citation needed] It was written to her lover and the love of her life, the French boxer, Marcel Cerdan. On October 28, 1949, Cerdan was killed in a plane crash on his way from Paris to New York to come to see her. She recorded the song on May 2, 1950. source

youtube.com

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:30:34+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:30:34 +0000 31, in classic music, female vocalist, FRENCH FRIDAYS, retro

 

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Eggs Benedict 

Eggs Benedict 

Eggs Benedict is a traditional American brunch or breakfast dish that consists of two halves of an English muffin each of which is topped with Canadian bacon – or sometimes bacon – a poached egg, and hollandaise sauce. The dish was first popularized in New York City. Many variations on the basic recipe are served.

Origin 

There are conflicting accounts as to the origin of Eggs Benedict.

In an interview recorded in the “Talk of the Town” column of The New Yorker in 1942, the year before his death,[1] Lemuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street stock broker, claimed that he had wandered into the Waldorf Hotel in 1894 and, hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover, ordered “buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon, and a hooker of hollandaise”. Oscar Tschirky, the famed maître d’hôtel, was so impressed with the dish that he put it on the breakfast and luncheon menus but substituted ham for the bacon and a toasted English muffin for the toast.[2]

Eggs Benedict with smoked salmon in place of Canadian bacon, also known as Eggs Royale

Another claim to the creation of Eggs Benedict was circuitously made by Edward P. Montgomery on behalf of Commodore E. C. Benedict. In 1967 Montgomery wrote a letter to then The New York Times food columnist Craig Claiborne which included a recipe he claimed to have received through his uncle, a friend of the commodore. Commodore Benedict’s recipe — by way of Montgomery — varies greatly from chef Ranhofer’s version,[3] particularly in the hollandaise sauce preparation — calling for the addition of “hot, hard-cooked egg and ham mixture”.[4]

Delmonico’s in lower Manhattan claims on its menu that “Eggs Benedict was first created in our ovens in 1860.”[5]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:18:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:18:00 +0000 31, in breakfast

 

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