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“Crocodile Rock – Elton John”

Crocodile Rock” is a song written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, and recorded in summer 1972 at the Château d’Hérouville studio in France (it was listed as “Strawberry Studios” in the album’s credits), where John and his team had previously recorded the Honky Château album. It was released on 27 October 1972 in the UK and 20 November 1972 in the U.S., as a pre-release single from his forthcoming 1973 album Don’t Shoot Me I’m Only the Piano Player, and became his first U.S. number-one single, reaching the top spot on 3 February 1973, and stayed there for three weeks. In the U.S., it was certified Gold on 5 February 1973 and Platinum on 13 September 1995 by the RIAA.[1] In Canada, it topped the chart as well, remaining at No.1 on the RPM 100 national singles chart for four weeks from 17 February – 10 March. It was the first song released as a single on the MCA label (catalogue #40000) after MCA dissolved its Uni, Decca, Kapp and Coral labels. (John had previously been with the Uni label.)[2] “Crocodile Rock” is dominated by a Farfisa organ, played by John. The lyrics take a nostalgic look at early rock ‘n’ roll, dating and youthful independence of that era. Elton John band members, including Davey Johnstone on guitars, Dee Murray on bass and Nigel Olsson on drums, were also performers on the song. Elton John, however, did all the vocals, including the falsetto backing vocals.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:20:03+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:20:03 +0000 31, in classic music, male vocalist, uk

 

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“True” By Spandau Ballet

“True” By Spandau Ballet

True” is a song by the English band Spandau Ballet. It was released on 14 April 1983 as the third single from their third studio album of the same name. The song was written by band member Gary Kemp.

The song was a huge worldwide hit, peaking at number one in the UK Singles Chart on 30 April 1983 for four weeks, becoming the sixth biggest selling single of the year, and charting highly in 20 other countries. It is Spandau Ballet’s biggest hit and their only major hit in the U.S., reaching number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the autumn of 1983 and topping the adult contemporary chart for one week.

In 1985, the band performed the song during Live Aid. A new mix by Tony Swain and Gary Kemp was released in 2002 on the compilation album Reformation.

On 30 April 2008, the single celebrated its 25th anniversary, and in honour, EMI released a brand new True EP on 5 May 2008, which included the original single, the new mix found on Reformation and the remastered album version, plus a live recordings of “True” and “Gold” from the last show of the group’s 1983 tour at Sadlers Wells.

A notable omission is that Spandau Ballet bassist Martin Kemp did not perform on the track, rather a bass synthesizer was used instead. However, Kemp would play in his capacity for future live performances.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T10:02:43+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 10:02:43 +0000 31, in other, pop music, uk

 

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“Simply Red – Holding Back The Years”

“Simply Red – Holding Back The Years”

Simply Red are a British soul and pop band which formed in 1983 in Manchester. The lead singer of the band was the singer and songwriter Mick Hucknall, who, by the time the band was disbanded in 2010, was the only original member left.
At the 1992 and 1993 Brit Awards, they received the award for Best British Group.They received three Grammy Awardnominations: for Best New Artist in 1987, and “Holding Back the Years” and “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocals. The band re-formed in 2015. Simply Red have sold over 50 million records worldwide.

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T09:46:06+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 09:46:06 +0000 31, in rock, uk

 

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“Tommy James and The Shondells – Mony Mony”

Mony Mony” is a 1968 single by American pop rock band Tommy James and the Shondells,which reached No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart and No. 3 in the U.S. Written by Bobby Bloom, Ritchie Cordell, Bo Gentry and Tommy James, the song has appeared in various film and television works such as the Oliver Stone drama Heaven & Earth. It was also covered by English singer-songwriter Billy Idol in 1981. Idol’s version, which took in more of a rock sound, became an international top 40 hit and additionally revived public interest in the original garage rock single. In 1986 it was covered by Amazulu, who gave it a skarendition.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-05T10:30:31+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 05 Jan 2019 10:30:31 +0000 31, in male vocal group, rock, uk

 

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“Dire Straits – Sultans Of Swing “

“Dire Straits – Sultans Of Swing “

“Sultans of Swing” is a song by British rock band Dire Straits from their eponymous debut album, which band frontman Mark Knopfler wrote and composed. Although it was first released in 1978, it was its 1979 re-release that caused it to become a hit in both the UK and U.S.

The song was recorded at Pathway Studios, North London, in July 1977 and quickly acquired a following after it was put on rotation at Radio London. Its popularity soon reached record executives, and Dire Straits were offered a contract with Phonogram Records. The song was then re-recorded in February 1978 at Basing Street Studios for the band’s debut album. The record company wanted a less-polished rock sound for the radio, so an alternative version was recorded at Pathway Studios in April 1978 and released as the single in some countries including the United Kingdom and Germany.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-04T10:03:51+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 04 Jan 2019 10:03:51 +0000 31, in 1970s, music, rock, uk

 

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Dusty Springfield “Brand New Me”

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Influenced by US pop music, Dusty Springfield created a distinctive blue-eyed soul sound. BBC News noted “[h]er soulful voice, at once strident and vulnerable, set her apart from her contemporaries … She was equally at home singing Broadway standards, blues, country or even techno-pop”.   Allmusic’s Jason Ankeny described her…
en.m.wikipedia.org

Artist Biography by Jason Ankeny

Britain’s greatest pop diva, Dusty Springfield was also the finest white soul singer of her era, a performer of remarkable emotional resonance whose body of work spans the decades and their attendant musical transformations with a consistency and purity unmatched by any of her contemporaries; though a camp icon of glamorous excess in her towering beehive hairdo and panda-eye black mascara, the sultry intimacy and heartbreaking urgency of Springfield‘s voice transcended image and fashion, embracing everything from lushly orchestrated pop to gritty R&B to disco with unparalleled sophistication and depth. She was born Mary O’Brien on April 16, 1939, and raised on an eclectic diet of classical music and jazz, coming to worship Peggy Lee; after completing her schooling she joined the Lana Sisters, a pop vocal trio which issued a few singles on Fontana before dissolving. In 1960, upon teaming with her brother Dion O’ Brien and his friend Tim Feild in the folk trio the SpringfieldsO’Brien adopted the stage name Dusty Springfield; thanks to a series of hits including “Breakaway,” “Bambino,” and “Say I Won’t Be There,” the group was soon the U.K.’s best-selling act.

After the Springfields cracked the U.S. Top 20 in 1962 with “Silver Threads and Golden Needles,” the group traveled stateside to record in Nashville, where exposure to the emerging American girl-group and Motown sounds impacted Dusty so profoundly that in 1963 she left the Springfields at the peak of their fame to pursue a solo career. Her first single, “I Only Want to Be With You,” boasted a dramatic sound and soulful melody worthy of a Phil Spectorhit, and it quickly reached the British Top Five; it also fell just shy of the Top Ten in the U.S., where it became the first major record from a U.K. act other than the Beatles since the Fab Four’s launch of the British Invasion. Her biggest American Top Ten hit, “Wishin’ and Hopin’,” was the first in a series of Springfield smashes from the pen of songwriters Burt Bacharach and Hal David; she would subsequently cover Bacharach/David classics including “Anyone Who Had a Heart” and “I Just Don’t Know What to Do With Myself,” surpassed only by Dionne Warwick as the finest interpreter of the duo’s songs.

Additionally charting with hits including “Stay Awhile” and “All Cried Out,” by the end of 1964 Springfield was arguably the biggest solo act in British pop, winning the first of four consecutive Best Female Vocalist honors in NME; that same year, she also created a political furor after she was deported from South Africa for refusing to play in front of racially segregated audiences. Returning to England, in 1965 Springfield hosted the television special The Sound of Motown, a show widely credited with introducing the Sound of Young America to the their British counterparts, and continued racking up smashes like “Losing You,” “Your Hurtin’ Kinda Love,” and “In the Middle of Nowhere”; in 1966, she scored her biggest international hit with the devastating ballad “You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me,” which topped the U.K. charts and reached the Top Five in the U.S. The soundalike “All I See Is You,” another heart-wrenching evocation of unrequited love, soon reached the British Top Ten as well; it was followed, however, by the Bacharach/David-penned “The Look of Love,” a bossa nova-inflected classic positively radiating with dreamlike sensuousness.

By 1968, however, Springfield‘s commercial fortunes were on the decline — in the wake of psychedelia and the Summer of Love, “girl singers” were now widely perceived as little more than fluff. In response, she signed to the American label Atlantic, traveling to Memphis to record with producers Jerry WexlerTom Dowd, and Arif Mardin; the resulting album, issued in early 1969 as Dusty in Memphis, remains her masterpiece, a perfect marriage of pop and soul stunning in its emotional complexity and earthy beauty. Although the classic single “Son of a Preacher Man” cracked the Top Ten on both sides of the pond, the album itself was nevertheless a commercial failure, as was its fine 1970 follow-up, A Brand New Me, recorded in Philadelphia with the input of the songwriting/production team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. After completing 1972’s See All Her FacesSpringfield relocated from London to New York City, eventually settling in Los Angeles; there she signed to ABC/Dunhill and recorded 1973’s Cameo, another critical success which like its predecessors made virtually no impact on the charts.

Living Without Your Love

A projected follow-up, Longings, was abandoned prior to its completion, and apart from singing backup on Anne Murray‘s Together album, Springfield spent the mid-’70s outside of music while battling substance abuse problems. She finally resurfaced in 1978 with the Roy Thomas Baker-produced It Begins Again, followed a year later by Living Without Your Love; both attracted little notice, although the non-album single “Baby Blue” was a minor British hit in 1979. Apart from a handful of soundtrack contributions, Springfield was silent until returning to London in 1982 to record White Heat, an album firmly grounded in the prevailing synth-pop sound of its times; again, despite good critical notices, a comeback failed to materialize. She would release just a handful of singles over the next few years, including the 1984 Spencer Davis duet “Private Number,” the 1985 ballad “Sometimes Like Butterflies,” and a 1987 collaboration with Richard Carpenter, “Something in Your Eyes,” which became a minor success in the U.S.

Reputation

Upon returning to California in 1987, Springfield was contacted to collaborate with techno-pop innovators the Pet Shop Boys on a duet titled “What Have I Done to Deserve This?” The single was a global blockbuster, peaking at number two in both the U.S. and the U.K., and it introduced her to a new generation of listeners; Pet Shop Boys Neil Tennantand Chris Lowe also agreed to produce a handful of tracks for 1990’s Reputation, which became Springfield‘s best-selling new album since her ’60s-era peak. The follow-up, 1995’s country-influenced A Very Fine Love, was recorded in Nashville; during sessions for the album, she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and after months of radiation therapy the illness was believed to be in remission. By the summer of 1996, however, the cancer had returned, and on March 2, 1999, Springfield died at the age of 59; just ten days later, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

http://www.allmusic.com

 

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T09:45:20+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 09:45:20 +0000 31, in female vocalist, uk

 

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“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

George Alan O’Dowd (born 14 June 1961), known professionally as Boy George, is an English singer, songwriter, DJ, fashion designer and photographer. He is the lead singer of the Grammy and Brit Award-winning pop band Culture Club. At the height of the band’s fame, during the 1980s, they recorded global hit songs such as “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”, “Time (Clock of the Heart)” and “Karma Chameleon” and George was known for his soulful voice and androgynous appearance. He was part of the English New Romantic movement which emerged in the late 1970s to the early 1980s.

His music is often classified as blue-eyed soul, which is influenced by rhythm and blues and reggae. He was lead singer of Jesus Loves You during the period 1989–1992. His 1990s and 2000s-era solo music has glam influences, such as David Bowie and Iggy Pop. More recently, he has released fewer music recordings, splitting his time between songwriting, DJing, writing books, designing clothes and photography.

Boy George – Do You Really Want To Hurt Me Lyrics

Give me time
To release my crime
Let me love and steal
I have danced
Inside your eyes
How can love be real
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Precious kisses
Words that burn me
Lovers never ask you why
In my heart
The fires burning
Choose my colour
Find a star
Precious people always tell me
That’s a step
A step too far
*Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Words are few
I have spoken
I could waste a thousand years
Wrapped in sorrow
Words are token
Come inside/and catch my tears
You’ve been talking
But believe me
If it’s true
You do not know
This boy loves without a reason
I’m prepared
To let you go
If it’s love you want from me
Then take it away
Everything is not what you see
It’s over again

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/boy+george/do+you+really+want+to+hurt+me_20192555.html

“Do You Really Want to Hurt Me” is a song written and recorded by the British new wave band Culture Club. Released as a single in September 1982 from the group’s platinum-selling debut album Kissing to Be Clever, it was the band’s first UK #1 hit. In the United States, the single was released in November 1982 and also became a huge hit, reaching #2 for three weeks.

en.m.Wikipedia.com

 
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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-30T10:45:09+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 30 Dec 2018 10:45:09 +0000 31, in male vocalist, pop music, uk

 

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