RSS

Category Archives: uk

“Dusty Springfield-Oh Me Oh My (i’m a fool for you baby)”

image

Oh Me Oh My (I’m a Fool for You Baby)” is a Top 30 hit for Lulu which charted in 1969–70; the song has been most notably remade by Aretha Franklin and Tina Arena.

Lulu’s version

“Oh Me Oh My…” was written by Jim Doris who – as Jimmy Doris – had been vocalist-guitarist for the Stoics, a band which formed in Lulu’s native Glasgow in the late 1960s and whose membership had included Frankie Miller. Doris contributed another song to “Oh Me Oh My…”‘s parent album New Routes, entitled “After All (I Live My Life)”, and his composition “Take Good Care of Yourself” was featured on the follow-up album Melody Fair. Reportedly Doris subsequently went into A&R work before being sidelined by mental instability which factored into his being killed when run over by a bus in London in the late 1980s or early 1990s.

The advance single from Lulu’s Atco Records debut album New Routes, “Oh Me Oh My…”, was released in October 1969. A radical change of direction for Lulu, who was coming off her best ever UK chart placing at #2 with the Eurovision winner “Boom Bang-a-Bang”, the move to a more mature sound with “Oh Me Oh My…” was unappreciated in the UK where the track barely reached the Top 50. In the US, “Oh Me Oh My…” ranked as high as #4 in Birmingham, Alabama in November 1969 but nationally charted only as a moderate Easy Listening hit at #36. Several performances by Lulu on US television helped break “Oh Me Oh My…” into the Billboard Hot 100 in December 1969 and then buoy the track as it gradually gained momentum to become Lulu’s first Top 30 hit since “To Sir With Love” at the end of February 1970: “Oh Me Oh My…” would peak at #22 that March (Cash Box ranked the track with a #18 peak).

In Australia the Go-Set Top 40 chart ranked “Oh Me Oh My…” with a #33 peak in January 1970. The RPM 100 chart for Canada ranked “Oh Me Oh My…” as high as #16 in March 1970; that same month the New Zealand Listener Pop-o-meter chart ranked “Oh Me Oh My…” as high as #12.1

Lulu recorded a translated version of “Oh Me Oh My…” for release in Italy, entitled “Povera Me”; the track was released in June 1970 to no apparent attention despite a promotional junket by Lulu that July.

The only national hit parade available for New Zealand 1966–1975, the Pop-o-meter chart, did not reflect sales, rather being a poll compiled from voting coupons sent in by NZ Listener readers.

source

 

Tags: ,

“LET IT BE” …..SONG by the Beatles

“LET IT BE” …..SONG by the Beatles

TOWER AND FLIGHTS

Let It Be is a song by The Beatles, released in March 6th 1970 as a single, and as the title track of their album Let It Be. Although credited to Lennon/McCartney it is generally accepted to be a Paul McCartney composition.
The single reached #1 in the U.S., Australia, Italy, Norway and Switzerland and #2 in the UK.

It was the final single released by the Beatles while the band was still active. The song was played in the ending of the song, “The Complete Beatles.”

LET IT BE – (Lyrics)

When I
find myself in times of trouble,
Mother Mary comes to me
Speaking words of wisdom,
let it be
And in my hour of darkness she
is standing right in front of me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be
Let it be, let it be, let it be, let it be
Whisper words of wisdom, let…

View original post 184 more words

 

Tags: ,

“True” By Spandau Ballet

“True” By Spandau Ballet

True” is a song by the English band Spandau Ballet. It was released on 14 April 1983 as the third single from their third studio album of the same name. The song was written by band member Gary Kemp.

The song was a huge worldwide hit, peaking at number one in the UK Singles Chart on 30 April 1983 for four weeks, becoming the sixth biggest selling single of the year, and charting highly in 20 other countries. It is Spandau Ballet’s biggest hit and their only major hit in the U.S., reaching number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the autumn of 1983 and topping the adult contemporary chart for one week.

In 1985, the band performed the song during Live Aid. A new mix by Tony Swain and Gary Kemp was released in 2002 on the compilation album Reformation.

On 30 April 2008, the single celebrated its 25th anniversary, and in honour, EMI released a brand new True EP on 5 May 2008, which included the original single, the new mix found on Reformation and the remastered album version, plus a live recordings of “True” and “Gold” from the last show of the group’s 1983 tour at Sadlers Wells.

A notable omission is that Spandau Ballet bassist Martin Kemp did not perform on the track, rather a bass synthesizer was used instead. However, Kemp would play in his capacity for future live performances.

Wikipedia.org

 
5 Comments

Posted by on 04/10 in other, pop music, uk

 

Tags:

“Maybe I’m Amazed” by Paul McCartney

“Maybe I’m Amazed” by Paul McCartney

Maybe I’m Amazed” is a song written by Paul McCartney that was first released on his 1970 album McCartney. McCartney dedicated the song to his wife, Linda, who had helped him get through the break-up of the Beatles.
Although the original recording has never been released as a single, a live performance by McCartney’s later band Wings, from the live album Wings over America, was. This version became a top-ten hit in the United States and reached number 28 in the United Kingdom.

McCartney wrote the song in 1969, just before the Beatles’ break-up. He credited his wife Linda with helping him get through the difficult time. Although most of his debut solo album was recorded at his home in London, McCartney recorded “Maybe I’m Amazed” entirely in EMI’s Number Two studio in Abbey Road, on the same day as he recorded “Every Night”. He played all the instruments: guitars, bass, piano, organ and drums. Although McCartney declined to release the song as a single in 1970, it nonetheless received a great deal of radio airplay worldwide.A promotional film was made, comprising still photographs of McCartney, his wife Linda, stepdaughter Heather, and daughter Mary, which first aired in the UK on 19 April 1970 on ITV in its own slot, and as a part of an episode of CBS Television’s The Ed Sullivan Show.

The original studio version of the song finished with a fade instead of a full ending, but McCartney later composed an ending that can be heard on the live versions of the song. McCartney first performed this live with Wings, in Châteauvallon, France, on July 91972.

Regarded as one of McCartney’s finest love songs, it achieved the number 347 position in the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” list compiled by Rolling Stone magazine in November 2004. In a late 2009 Q&A with journalists held in London to promote his live album Good Evening New York City, McCartney said “Maybe I’m Amazed” was “the song he would like to be remembered for in the future.”

source

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 04/10 in music, rock, uk

 

Tags:

Paul McCartney – “Let ‘Em In”

Paul McCartney – “Let ‘Em In”

“Let ‘Em In” is a song by Wings from their 1976 album Wings at the Speed of Sound. It was written and sung by Paul McCartney and reached the top 3 in the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada. It was a No. 2 hit in the UK; in the U.S. it was a No. 3 pop hit and No. 1 easy listening hit. In Canada, the song was No. 3 for three weeks on the pop chart and No. 1 for three weeks on the MOR chart of RPM magazine. The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies. It can also be found on McCartney’s 1987 compilation album, All the Best! A demo of the song, featuring Denny Laine on lead vocal, was included as a bonus track on the Archive Collection reissue of Wings at the Speed of Sound.

 
 

Tags: ,

“Rolling Stones – Angie (HQ)”

“Rolling Stones – Angie (HQ)”

The song is credited, as most Rolling Stones songs are, to both Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, but it is acknowledged to be almost completely written by Richards. “Angie” was recorded in November and December 1972 and is an acoustic-guitar-driven ballad characterizing the end of a romance. The song’s distinctive piano accompaniment, written by Richards, was played on the album by Nicky Hopkins, a Rolling Stones recording-session regular. The strings on the piece (as well as on another song, “Winter”) were arranged by Nicky Harrison.[2] An unusual feature of the original recording is that singer Mick Jagger’s vocal guide track (made before the final vocals were performed) is faintly audible throughout the song (an effect sometimes called a “ghost vocal”).[3]

Released as a single in August 1973, “Angie” went straight to the top of the US BillboardHot 100 and reached No. 5 on the UK singles chart. The song was also a No. 1 hit in both Canada and Australia for five weeks each and topped the charts in many countries throughout Europe and the rest of the world.

Because of the song’s length, some radio stations made edits to shorten it to 3 minutes, omitting the longer coda and the second instrumental section of the song.

There was speculation that the song was about David Bowie’s first wife Angela,[4][5][6]Keith Richards’ newborn daughter Dandelion Angela,[7][8] the actress Angie Dickinson,[7] and others. In 1993, in an interview for the liner notes to the Rolling Stones’ compilation album Jump Back: The Best of The Rolling Stones, Richards said that the title was inspired by his baby daughter.[9] However, in his 2010 memoir Life, Richards said that he had chosen the name at random when writing the song — before he knew that his baby would be named Angela or even knew that his baby would be a girl — and that the song “was not about any particular person.”[10] According to NME, Jagger’s contributions to the lyrics referred to his breakup with Marianne Faithfull.[5]

The Rolling Stones have frequently performed the song in concert; it was included in set lists on their 1973, 1975, and 1976 tours, and they have performed it on every tour since their 1982 European tour.[11] Concert renditions were released on the albums Stripped, Live Licks and The Rolling Stones: Havana Moon.

In the documentary Protagonist, the former German extremist Hans-Joachim Kleinremarks that the song inspired him to adopt “Angie” as the moniker he used during his militant activities in the 1970s.[12] In 2005, the German political party CDU used the song in its election campaign for Angela Merkel, although the Rolling Stones had not given them permission to do so.

Wikipedia.org

Angie, Angie
When will those dark clouds all disappear
Angie, Angie
Where will it lead us from here
With no lovin’ in our souls
And no money in our coats
You can’t say we’re satisfied
Angie, Angie
You can’t say we never tried
Angie, you’re beautiful
But ain’t it time we say goodbye
Angie, I still love you
Remember all those nights we cried
All the dreams were held so close
Seemed to all go up in smoke
Let me whisper in your ear
Angie, Angie
Where will it lead us from here
Oh, Angie, don’t you wish
Oh your kisses still taste sweet
I hate that sadness in your eyes
But Angie
Angie
Ain’t it time we said goodbye
With no lovin’ in our souls
And no money in our coats
You can’t say we’re satisfied
Angie, I still love you baby
Everywhere I look I see your eyes
There ain’t a woman that comes close to you
Come on baby dry your eyes
Angie, Angie ain’t good to be alive
Angie, Angie, we can’t say we never tried
Songwriters: Keith Richards / Mick Jagger
 
 

Tags:

“Cream – White Room

Cream is well noted as a 1960s British rock power trio consisting of drummer Ginger Baker, guitarist/singer Eric Clapton and lead singer/bassist Jack Bruce. The group’s third album, Wheels of Fire (1968), was the world’s first platinum-selling double album. The band is widely regarded as the world’s first successful supergroup. In their career, they sold more than 15 million copies of their albums worldwide. Their music included songs based on traditional blues such as “Crossroads” and “Spoonful“, and modern blues such as “Born Under a Bad Sign“, as well as more current material such as “Strange Brew“, “Tales of Brave Ulysses” and “Toad“.

The band’s biggest hits were “I Feel Free” (UK number 11), “Sunshine of Your Love” (US number 5), “White Room” (US number 6),”Crossroads” (US number 28), and “Badge” (UK number 18).

The band made a significant impact on the popular music of the time, and, along with Jimi Hendrix and other notable guitarists and bands, popularised the use of the wah-wah pedal. They provided a heavy yet technically proficient musical theme that foreshadowed and influenced the emergence of British bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath in the late 1960s and the early 1970s. They also influenced American southern rock groups the Allman Brothers Band and Lynyrd Skynyrd. The band’s live performances influenced progressive rockacts such as Rush.

The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993. They were included in both Rolling Stone and VH1’s lists of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time,” at number 67 and 61 respectively. They were also ranked number 16 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 04/10 in music, rock, uk

 

Tags: ,

 
%d bloggers like this: