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MOBY-EXTREME WAYS

MOBY-EXTREME WAYS

Moby is an American electronic singer-songwriter known for songs like “Go” and “Porcelain,” and albums like Everything is Wrong and Play.

Synopsis

Born in New York City in 1965, Moby is an electronic singer-songwriter known for such popular songs as “Go,” “Natural Blues” and “Porcelain,” and albums like Everything is Wrong, Animal Rightsand Play. He released his ninth studio album, Wait for Me, in 2013.

Early Life

Moby was born Richard Melville Hall on September 11, 1965, in Harlem, New York. However, his parents felt that such a grand name was unsuited for such a small, fragile child, and thusly decided to call him Moby, after the eponymous whale from Herman Melville’s classic novel. In fact (and as suggested by his middle name), Herman Melville is actually Moby’s great-great-great-great uncle. “I’ve tried to read the book several times,” Moby has said of the legendary novel Moby Dick, “but I never quite got through it.”

When Moby was born, his mother, Elizabeth McBride Warner-Hall, was a student, and his father, James Hall, was a young lecturer in the chemistry department at Columbia University. Theirs was a troubled marriage and, when Moby’s father died in an alcohol-related car crash in 1967, some hypothesized that the accident was a suicide. Moby was just 2 years old when he lost his father. Soon after his father’s death, Moby’s mother, who was then only 23 years old, moved the family to Darien, Connecticut. There, Moby’s maternal grandparents helped raise him while his mother finished her college degree.

With his mother and grandmother both working full-time, Moby was often left to his own devices. “I spent a lot of time by myself,” he once said of his childhood, “and a lot of time was spent at my grandmother’s house which was rambling and old and had big overgrown gardens, so there were a lot of places to get lost and entertain myself. I am grateful that as a little boy I had lots of strange and interesting places to play.”

biography.com

 

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“I Believe I Can Fly” – R. Kelly

“I Believe I Can Fly” – R. Kelly

In early 1997, “I Believe I Can Fly” reached number two on the BillboardHot 100; it was kept from the number one spot by Toni Braxton‘s “Un-Break My Heart“. Although Kelly has had two number one songs on the pop chart, “I Believe I Can Fly” is his most successful single. It reached the number-one spot of the Billboard R&B Singles Chart and remained there for six non-consecutive weeks, keeping “Un-Break My Heart” from the top position of that chart for four of those weeks. “I Believe I Can Fly” also topped the charts in eight countries (including the United Kingdom), has won three Grammy Awards, and was ranked number 406 on Rolling Stones list of the500 Greatest Songs of All Time in 2004. The music video was directed by Kelly with Hype Williams[1] and designed by visual artist and designer Ron Norsworthy.Source

 

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“The Righteous Brothers – Unchained Melody

“The Righteous Brothers – Unchained Melody

The Righteous Brothers were the musical duo of Bobby Hatfield and Bill Medley. They recorded from 1963 through 1975 and continued to perform until Hatfield’s death in 2003. Their emotive vocal stylings were sometimes dubbed “blue-eyed soul”.

Hatfield and Medley both possessed exceptional vocal talent, with range, control and tone that helped them create a strong and distinctive duet sound and also to perform as soloists. Medley sang the low parts with his deep, soulful baritone, with Hatfield taking the higher register vocals with his soaring countertenor.

They adopted their name in 1962 while performing together in the Los Angeles area as part of a five-member group called The Paramours, which featured John Wimber (a founder of the Vineyard Movement) on keyboards and artist and sculptor Nick Turturro on saxophone. At the end of one performance, a U.S. Marine in the audience shouted, “That was righteous, brothers!”, prompting the pair to adopt the name as they embarked on their duo career.

Musical career 

John Wimber (then Johnny Wimber) brought Bobby Hatfield and Bill Medley together for the band The Paramours in 1962. The Righteous Brothers started their recording career on the small Moonglow label in 1963 with two albums and two moderate hits: “Little Latin Lupe Lu” and “My Babe”.

Their first major hit single was “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'”, their first release on the Philles label in 1965. Produced by Phil Spector, the record is often cited as one of the peak expressions of Spector’s Wall of Sound production techniques. It was one of the most successful pop singles of its time, despite exceeding the then standard length for radio play. Indeed, according to BMI, “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” was the most played song on American radio and television in the 20th century, estimated to have been broadcast more than eight million times. Spector used Cher (of Sonny & Cher fame) as a backing singer on this and other recordings.[citation needed]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

 

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“Dionne Warwick – Alfie” 1967

Alfie, from the 1966 Michael Caine classic, was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and was an Academy Award nominee for Best Song From A Motion Picture for 1966 (Born Free, the title track from the film of the same name, won). Bacharach wrote the tune with Warwick specifically in mind, but when the tune was pitched for the movie in London, Bacharach was overridden because the producers wanted a British singer to record the tune.

Cilla Black recorded the tune and her version died at number 95 in the USA, although a hit in England. Ironically, Cilla’s version was not used in the UK and European prints of the film; Sonny Rollins is heard in Australian prints of the film. When the film was released in the USA, United Artists felt a singer on their label should record the tune, so for the American prints of the film, Cher can be heard over the final credits, and her version peaked at 34 on the charts in 1966.

Alfie was recorded by 42 other singers before Burt finally got his wish to record Alfie with Dionne and she took it all the way to # 5 on Billboard’s Hot R&B Chart and #15 on Billboard’s Hot 100. Dionne has stated Burt insisted that she record the tune since he had written it specifically for her to sing in the film, and she was reluctant after 42 other versions had been released and asked Burt, “How many more recordings of Alfie do you need?” Burt’s reply? “Just one more, yours.” She agreed to cut the tune because she needed one more track to complete the album according to Steve Tyrell. Originally released on the Here Where There Is Love LP in early 1967, the track was pulled from the album and played frequently by DJs all over the country. Dionne sang Alfie at the Academy Awards Ceremony in March to a world-wide audience too much critical acclaim and the public began snap up her LP containing the tune.

In March 1967 Scepter released the tune as the “B” side of The Beginning of Loneliness, a little known but beautiful Bacharach/David ballad. But, DJ’s once again had the final word on the single and flipped it to make Alfie a huge hit, after Dionne’s stunning performance of Alfie at the Academy Awards. The Here Where There Is Love LP hit the top twenty on the Billboard album chart and received an RIAA gold record award. In 2008,

Dionne Warwick’s recording of Alfie was chosen for the Grammy Hall of Fame. Previous Warwick recordings honored by the Hall of Fame: Walk on By-1998, and Don’t Make Me Over-20. Youtube.com

 

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 “Wicked Game” 

 “Wicked Game” 

I Wanna Fall in Love” is a song written by Buddy Brock and Mark Spiro, and recorded by American country music artist Lila McCann. It was released in September 1997 as the second single from her debut album Lila. The song reached number 3 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart in February 1998[1] and number 1 on the RPM Country Tracks chart in Canada.

 
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Posted by on 04/10 in theme song

 

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“Boz Scaggs – Look What You’ve Done To Me”

“Boz Scaggs – Look What You’ve Done To Me”

Look What You’ve Done to Me” is a 1980 song recorded by Boz Scaggs, composed by Scaggs and David Foster for the movie Urban Cowboy. It reached #14 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in November, #13 on the Cash BoxTop 100,[1] and went to #3 on the Adult Contemporary chart.[2] The song reached #30 in Canada.
The song, reflecting on a broken romance (as depicted in Urban Cowboy), features the Eagles on background vocals and instrumentation by Don Felder on guitar and members of Toto and David Foster on keyboards. Two versions of the song were released. The more widely available version of the song (as released on Scaggs greatest hits compilations) places more emphasis on the Eagles’ background vocals, plus additional background vocal stylings by Scaggs towards the end of the song. The version as heard in the Urban Cowboy film (as well as its soundtrack) replaces the Eagles’ vocals with a female chorus.

Urban Cowboy is a 1980 American romantic drama film about the love-hate relationship between Buford Uan “Bud” Davis (John Travolta) and Sissy (Debra Winger). The movie captured the late 1970s/early 1980s popularity of country music.

Bud Davis (John Travolta) moves to Houstonfor a job in the city’s oil refinery industry. He hopes to save enough money to move back to his hometown of Spur, Texas and buy some land.[4] Bud stays with his Uncle Bob (Barry Corbin) and his family, with whom Bud is close. Bob takes Bud to the local honky tonk, Gilley’s (at the time, an actual bar in Pasadena, co-owned by singer Mickey Gilleyand his record producer Sherwood Cryer). Bud quickly embraces the local nightlife there. Bud gets a job at the oil refinery where Bob works and quickly befriends his co-workers.

At the club, Bud meets Sissy (Debra Winger), who asks if he is a real cowboy. They fall in love, and soon after Bud asks Sissy to marry him. Their wedding reception is held at Gilley’s, and they immediately move into a brand new mobile home. Although they are in love and passionate, Bud and Sissy have many quarrels. Sissy is a feisty, independent woman while Bud believes in traditional gender roles. However, their lives settle into a routine of work by day and Gilley’s at night, where Bud takes a liking to riding the mechanical bull. When Sissy also wants to ride, he forbids her from doing so.

Wes Hightower (Scott Glenn), is released on parole from Huntsville Penitentiary, lands a job at Gilley’s running the mechanical bull with his old friend and Gilley’s employee Steve Strange (James Gammon). He openly flirts with Sissy, who is flattered and attracted to Wes, but a drunken Bud is enraged at the insult and ends up in a fist fight with Wes. Sissy, against Bud’s wishes, spends time at Gilley’s during the day with Wes, Steve, and her friend Jessie (Jessie La Rive) learning how to ride the mechanical bull. Meanwhile, at the refinery Bud has a serious accident and is sent home for the day. That night at Gilley’s, Jessie and Wes convince Sissy to ride the bull. She does it to impress Bud but he becomes angry and resentful that Sissy defied and lied to him and he challenges her. When Bud falls off during his second ride in that challenge, Wes intentionally swings the bull around fast, breaking Bud’s arm. At home, Bud asks Sissy if she is having an affair with Wes which she denies and Bud forbids her from riding the bull anymore. Sissy accuses Bud of being jealous because she rides the bull better than he can. Bud slaps her and throws her out of the trailer.

The next night Sissy and Bud see each other at Gilley’s but an angry Sissy refuses to talk to Bud. To make Sissy jealous, Bud introduces himself to a beautiful girl named Pam (Madolyn Smith) and dances with her, while Sissy dances with Wes. Bud and Pam leave together to have sex but Sissy, hurt and upset, declines Wes’ sexual advances. Later, Sissy moves out of Bud’s trailer and into the run-down trailer behind Gilley’s where Wes lives.

Bud wants to enter the mechanical bull riding rodeo at Gilley’s to win the $5,000 prize and starts training with his uncle Bob, a former rodeo champion. One night while working at the refinery, Bob advises Bud to swallow his pride and make up with Sissy citing his own past behavior nearly cost him his wife and children. Bob is killed that night when lightning strikes the refinery. Meanwhile, Sissy returns to their mobile home to pick up her things, but she also cleans house and leaves Bud a note saying she hopes they can get back together. Pam arrives and after Sissy leaves throws the note away. Meanwhile, Sissy arrives home and catches Wes having sex with her friend Marshalene (Connie Hanson), another Gilley’s employee. Wes orders Sissy to cook him a meal and when she, hurt at his infidelity, angrily refuses Wes becomes physically abusive.

At Bob’s funeral, Sissy tells Bud that Wes was fired from Gilley’s for hurting too many people with the mechanical bull and is unable to find another job. They plan on going to Mexico after Wes wins the $5,000 prize at the bull riding rodeo. It is Bud who wins the contest, however, and Pam, realizing that Bud still loves Sissy, admits that Sissy cleaned the trailer and that she tore up a card Sissy left for him out of jealousy. She encourages him to reconcile with Sissy. Bud leaves to find Sissy before she departs for Mexico with Wes.

Sissy refuses to go to Mexico with Wes, but relents after he hits her. He orders her to wait for him in her car behind Gilley’s. Unknown to Sissy, Wes is inside Gilley’s stealing the entry money. Bud finds Sissy in the parking lot and tells her he still loves her and apologizes for hitting her. She reciprocates and they embrace. Seeing Sissy’s bruised face, a furious Bud goes after Wes and a fight ensues at the bar entrance. The fight causes Wes to drop his gun, and the stolen money falls from his jacket. Bud overpowers Wes punching him several times and pins him down on the floor. Gilley’s staff, having discovered the robbery, apprehend Wes. Bud and Sissy, reconciled, go home together.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

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“Endless Love – Diana Ross & Lionel Richie”

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Endless Love” is a song written by Lionel Richie and originally recorded as a duet between Richie and fellow soul singer Diana Ross. In this ballad, the singers declare their “endless love” for one another. It was covered by soul singer Luther Vandross with pop singer Mariah Carey and also by country music singer Shania Twain. Richie’s friend (and sometimes co-worker) Kenny Rogers has also recorded the song. Billboard has named the original version as the greatest song duet of all-time.[1]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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