Category Archives: theme song

“Lulu To Sir With Love”

“Lulu To Sir With Love”

Lulu Kennedy-Cairns, OBE (born Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie, 3 November 1948), best known by her stage name


, is a Scottish singer, actress, and television personality who has been successful in the entertainment business since the 1960s.

She is internationally identified, especially by North American audiences, with the song

“To Sir with Love”

from the film of the same name and with the title song to the James Bond film The Man with the Golden Gun. In European countries, she is also widely known for her Eurovision Song Contest winning entry “Boom Bang-a-Bang” and in the UK for her first hit “Shout”, which was performed at the closing ceremony of the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.


Posted by on March 14, 2018 in music, theme song, uk


Tags: ,



Moby is an American electronic singer-songwriter known for songs like “Go” and “Porcelain,” and albums like Everything is Wrong and Play.


Born in New York City in 1965, Moby is an electronic singer-songwriter known for such popular songs as “Go,” “Natural Blues” and “Porcelain,” and albums like Everything is Wrong, Animal Rightsand Play. He released his ninth studio album, Wait for Me, in 2013.

Early Life

Moby was born Richard Melville Hall on September 11, 1965, in Harlem, New York. However, his parents felt that such a grand name was unsuited for such a small, fragile child, and thusly decided to call him Moby, after the eponymous whale from Herman Melville’s classic novel. In fact (and as suggested by his middle name), Herman Melville is actually Moby’s great-great-great-great uncle. “I’ve tried to read the book several times,” Moby has said of the legendary novel Moby Dick, “but I never quite got through it.”

When Moby was born, his mother, Elizabeth McBride Warner-Hall, was a student, and his father, James Hall, was a young lecturer in the chemistry department at Columbia University. Theirs was a troubled marriage and, when Moby’s father died in an alcohol-related car crash in 1967, some hypothesized that the accident was a suicide. Moby was just 2 years old when he lost his father. Soon after his father’s death, Moby’s mother, who was then only 23 years old, moved the family to Darien, Connecticut. There, Moby’s maternal grandparents helped raise him while his mother finished her college degree.

With his mother and grandmother both working full-time, Moby was often left to his own devices. “I spent a lot of time by myself,” he once said of his childhood, “and a lot of time was spent at my grandmother’s house which was rambling and old and had big overgrown gardens, so there were a lot of places to get lost and entertain myself. I am grateful that as a little boy I had lots of strange and interesting places to play.”





Irene Cara (born Irene Cara

Escalera; March 18, 1959)[1][2] is an American singer, songwriter and actress. She became famous for her role as Coco Hernandez in the 1980 film Fame, earning her a Golden Globe nomination, and her recording of the song “Fame” became an international hit. Cara won an Academy Award in 1984 in the category of Best Original Song for co-writing “Flashdance

What a Feeling”,

which also became an international hit.[3]


Early life

Boggs describes Cara as a “perfectionist” “who works on a song until absolutely satisfied with it”. Ebony[4]

Cara appeared in on-and off-Broadway theatrical shows including the musicals Ain’t Misbehavin’, The Me Nobody Knows (which won an Obie Award), Maggie Flynn opposite Shirley Jones and Jack Cassidy, and Via Galactica with Raúl Juliá.

Cara was the original Daisy Allen on the 1970s daytime serial Love of Life. Next came her role as Angela in romance/thriller Aaron Loves Angela, followed by her portrayal of the title character in Sparkle. Television brought Cara international acclaim for serious dramatic roles in two outstanding mini-series, Roots: The Next Generations and Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones.

John Willis’ Screen World, Vol. 28, named her one of twelve “Promising New Actors of 1976”; that same year, a readers’ poll in Right On! magazine named her Top Actress.

Cara graduated from the Professional Children’s School in Manhattan, a rival of the LaGuardia High School of Music & Art. Coincidentally, LaGuardia High was the inspiration for the performing arts school in her third movie, Fame, along with The Juilliard School. When she attended high school, it was called the School of Performing Arts. In 1984 the High School of Music & Art was merged with the School of Performing Arts (founded in 1948 by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia) to become LaGuardia High.


Posted by on March 3, 2018 in female vocalist, theme song



Grease – Greased Lighting – John Travolta

Grease – Greased Lighting – John Travolta

Greased Lightnin’” is a song from the musical Grease. A soundtrack recording from the film version, with John Travolta on lead vocals, peaked at No. 47 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1978.


Kenickie, a member of the greaser gang at the center of the musical, has purchased a used car with the savings from his summer job, giving it the nickname “Greased Lightnin’.” While the other greasers are skeptical of the car because it is in such poor shape, he is able to win them over with a rousing rock and roll number describing the modifications needed to transform it into a hot rod capable of arousing the ladies.

In the original recording, as was in the case with the stage musical on which it was based, several unairable profanities of a sexual nature are peppered throughout the lyrics, which deterred a number of stations from playing the song and possibly prevented it from reaching the top 40 in the United States. It was one of the few songs from the original Chicago-centric version of Grease to transition, uncut, from Chicago to Broadway and to film. Jim Jacobs later released a revised set of lyrics suitable for school performances that remove the sexual references, and most televised edits of the film cut the offending lyrics.

In the original musical, the song is Kenickie’s featured number, with the other greasers serving as his backup singers. The film expands upon the car’s purpose. Whereas the stage musical gives no particular reason for Kenickie’s desire to build the car (which does not play a major factor in the play beyond that point), the film explains that the greasers’ rivals, named the Scorpions in the film, had challenged them to a quarter-mile drag race, requiring them to have a competitive car for the duel. With Danny at the helm (and a reprise of “Greased Lightnin'” playing in the background), Greased Lightnin’ wins the race. The film is also notable for having Danny (played by John Travolta, who had already had top-40 hits before Grease) sing lead on the song, while Kenickie (Jeff Conaway) contributed with a few call-and-response lines.

In keeping with the musical’s tendency to use styles of music popular in the late 1950s, the song “Greased Lightnin'” is in a slightly modified twelve-bar blues form.



“Phil Collins – Against All Odds”

Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)” (also titled “Against All Odds“) is a song by English drummer, singer and songwriter Phil Collins. It was recorded for the soundtrack to the 1984 film of the same name. It is a power ballad in which its protagonist implores an ex-lover to “take a look at me now”, knowing that reconciliation is “against all odds” while considering it worth trying. The single reached number two in the United Kingdom, while it peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, the first of seven US number ones for Collins in his solo career.[4]

Collins was approached to write the title song to the film Against All Odds while it was still in its “rough cut form”.[7] At the time the soundtrack was being completed, Collins was on tour with Genesis. Director Taylor Hackford flew into Chicago to see one of the band’s concerts. Collins watched the movie on a videocassette recorder in his hotel room and agreed to appear on the soundtrack.[8]

Originally titled “How Can You Just Sit There?”, the song was initially from the sessions for Collins’ debut solo album Face Value (1981).[9] Collins wrote the song, while arranger Arif Mardin produced it.[8] The piano performance is by New York musician Rob Mounsey. Piano, keyboard bass and a string section arranged and conducted by Mardin were recorded at RCA Studios, New York, while Collins recorded vocals and drums in Los Angeles.[10]

According to Collins in a 1985 interview with Dan Neer: “We recorded the song in two days. One day in New York, the other in Los Angeles. The mixes were done by phone and the song went to Number 1. I couldn’t believe it”.

On episode 339 of This American Life, “Break Up”, Collins relays that the song was inspired and written shortly after the breakup between him and his first wife. In the interview he says that the divorce transformed him from being a musician into also being a lyricist.

The song was first included on a Collins album on the 1998 compilation Hits, and it also appeared on his compilation Love Songs: A Compilation… Old and New (2004). A live performance of the song also appears on the Serious Hits… Live! album. In 2015, Collins released the original demo recording from the Face Value sessions as part of his Take A Look At Me Now project.


Posted by on February 23, 2018 in ballad, Billboard, music, theme song



“Irene Cara. – FAME”


“Fame” is a pop song, written by Michael Gore (music) and Dean Pitchford (lyrics),[1] released in 1980 that achieved chart success as the theme song to the Fame film and TV series.[1] The song was performed by Irene Cara,  who played the role of Coco Hernandez in the original movie. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1980,[1] and the Golden Globe Award the same year. In 2004 it finished at number 51 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

Irene Carawas given
the role of Coco Hernandez in the movie Fame. Cara composed the song for this movie.[2] The songs music was by Michael Gore and lyrics by Dean Pitchford and Cara sang it. The song got Cara Grammy nominations for Best New Female Artist and Best New Pop Artist.[3] The movie became an “overnight sensation”. The song won an Oscar for best film theme song in 1981. In July 1982 in topped the British charts. The movie was adapted into a TV series and stage show which toured Europe.[2]

Fame theme song
The song was later used as the theme song for the Fame television series, which aired from 1982 to 1987. It was also used in other TV shows related to Fame.


Fame TV show starring Debbie Allen



“Endless Love – Diana Ross & Lionel Richie”


Endless Love” is a song written by Lionel Richie and originally recorded as a duet between Richie and fellow soul singer Diana Ross. In this ballad, the singers declare their “endless love” for one another. It was covered by soul singer Luther Vandross with pop singer Mariah Carey and also by country music singer Shania Twain. Richie’s friend (and sometimes co-worker) Kenny Rogers has also recorded the song. Billboard has named the original version as the greatest song duet of all-time.[1]


Tags: , ,

%d bloggers like this: