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Category Archives: theme song

“IRENE CARA – WHAT A FEELING (WITH LYRICS)” 

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Irene Cara (born Irene Cara

Escalera; March 18, 1959)[1][2] is an American singer, songwriter and actress. She became famous for her role as Coco Hernandez in the 1980 film Fame, earning her a Golden Globe nomination, and her recording of the song “Fame” became an international hit. Cara won an Academy Award in 1984 in the category of Best Original Song for co-writing “Flashdance

What a Feeling”,

which also became an international hit.[3]

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Early life

Boggs describes Cara as a “perfectionist” “who works on a song until absolutely satisfied with it”. Ebony[4]

Cara appeared in on-and off-Broadway theatrical shows including the musicals Ain’t Misbehavin’, The Me Nobody Knows (which won an Obie Award), Maggie Flynn opposite Shirley Jones and Jack Cassidy, and Via Galactica with Raúl Juliá.

Cara was the original Daisy Allen on the 1970s daytime serial Love of Life. Next came her role as Angela in romance/thriller Aaron Loves Angela, followed by her portrayal of the title character in Sparkle. Television brought Cara international acclaim for serious dramatic roles in two outstanding mini-series, Roots: The Next Generations and Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones.

John Willis’ Screen World, Vol. 28, named her one of twelve “Promising New Actors of 1976”; that same year, a readers’ poll in Right On! magazine named her Top Actress.

Cara graduated from the Professional Children’s School in Manhattan, a rival of the LaGuardia High School of Music & Art. Coincidentally, LaGuardia High was the inspiration for the performing arts school in her third movie, Fame, along with The Juilliard School. When she attended high school, it was called the School of Performing Arts. In 1984 the High School of Music & Art was merged with the School of Performing Arts (founded in 1948 by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia) to become LaGuardia High.

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Posted by on June 19, 2017 in female vocalist, theme song

 

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“Phil Collins – Against All Odds”


Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)” (also titled “Against All Odds“) is a song by English drummer, singer and songwriter Phil Collins. It was recorded for the soundtrack to the 1984 film of the same name. It is a power ballad in which its protagonist implores an ex-lover to “take a look at me now”, knowing that reconciliation is “against all odds” while considering it worth trying. The single reached number two in the United Kingdom, while it peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, the first of seven US number ones for Collins in his solo career.[4]

Collins was approached to write the title song to the film Against All Odds while it was still in its “rough cut form”.[7] At the time the soundtrack was being completed, Collins was on tour with Genesis. Director Taylor Hackford flew into Chicago to see one of the band’s concerts. Collins watched the movie on a videocassette recorder in his hotel room and agreed to appear on the soundtrack.[8]

Originally titled “How Can You Just Sit There?”, the song was initially from the sessions for Collins’ debut solo album Face Value (1981).[9] Collins wrote the song, while arranger Arif Mardin produced it.[8] The piano performance is by New York musician Rob Mounsey. Piano, keyboard bass and a string section arranged and conducted by Mardin were recorded at RCA Studios, New York, while Collins recorded vocals and drums in Los Angeles.[10]

According to Collins in a 1985 interview with Dan Neer: “We recorded the song in two days. One day in New York, the other in Los Angeles. The mixes were done by phone and the song went to Number 1. I couldn’t believe it”.

On episode 339 of This American Life, “Break Up”, Collins relays that the song was inspired and written shortly after the breakup between him and his first wife. In the interview he says that the divorce transformed him from being a musician into also being a lyricist.

The song was first included on a Collins album on the 1998 compilation Hits, and it also appeared on his compilation Love Songs: A Compilation… Old and New (2004). A live performance of the song also appears on the Serious Hits… Live! album. In 2015, Collins released the original demo recording from the Face Value sessions as part of his Take A Look At Me Now project.

 
 

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“Endless Love – Diana Ross & Lionel Richie”

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Endless Love” is a song written by Lionel Richie and originally recorded as a duet between Richie and fellow soul singer Diana Ross. In this ballad, the singers declare their “endless love” for one another. It was covered by soul singer Luther Vandross with pop singer Mariah Carey and also by country music singer Shania Twain. Richie’s friend (and sometimes co-worker) Kenny Rogers has also recorded the song. Billboard has named the original version as the greatest song duet of all-time.[1]

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“TE VAKA – TAMAHANA” Legend of Johnny Lingo

“TE VAKA – TAMAHANA” Legend of Johnny Lingo

The Legend of Johnny Lingo is a 2003 film set in Polynesia and directed by Steven Ramirez. It is an extension of the 1969 short film Johnny Lingo that is based on a story by Patricia McGerr.

PlotEdit

Orphan boy bounced around between families and getting into trouble, finally cast off and finds Johnny Lingo to take him under his wing. Eventually returns to first island to marry childhood sweetheart.

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TE VAKA – TAMAHANA: https://youtu.be/iafubcZ2EAY

 
 

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“Soulful Strut/Young-Holt Unlimited”

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Young-Holt Unlimited

Young-Holt Unlimited (also known as Young-Holt Trio), were a U.S. soul and jazz instrumental musical ensemble from Chicago, Illinois, United States.

Drummer Isaac “Red” Holt and bassist Eldee Young, formerly members of Ramsey Lewis’ jazz trio, formed a new outfit called the Young-Holt Trio with pianist Don Walker in 1966. They met with modest success, including the minor hit with “Wack-Wack”, which charted at number 40 on the Billboard Hot 100.

In 1968, the group renamed itself Young-Holt Unlimited, and replaced Walker with Ken Chaney. Under their new name, the group scored a number three Hot 100 hit with

“Soulful Strut,”

the backing instrumental track from Barbara Acklin’s “Am I the Same Girl.” “Soulful Strut” sold a million copies with the gold record awarded by the RIAA in January 1969, less than 3 months after the track’s release.[1] Follow-up releases failed to match the commercial success of

“Soulful Strut”,

and the group disbanded by 1974, with Young and Holt continuing to play in Chicago small bands.

Young died of a heart attack on February 12, 2007, in Bangkok, Thailand, at the age of 71.[2]

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“JOHN DENVER – MR. BOJANGLES”

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“Mr. Bojangles” is a song originally written and recorded by American country music artist Jerry Jeff Walker for his 1968 album of the same title. Since then, it has been recorded by many other artists, including US country music band the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, whose version (recorded for the 1970 album Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy) was issued as a single and rose to number nine on the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart in 1971. Live versions of the song appeared on Walker’s 1977 album, A Man Must Carry On and his 1980 album The Best of Jerry Jeff Walker.

The NGDB’s single version begins with the Uncle Charlie interview (subtitled “Prologue: Uncle Charlie and his Dog Teddy”) that also precedes the song on the Uncle Charlie album. This was originally backed with another interview with Uncle Charlie, also taken from the album. When “Mr. Bojangles” started climbing the charts, the B-side was re-pressed with the same song without the interview prologue. NGDB guitarist Jeff Hanna performed most of the lead vocals on the track, with bandmate Jim Ibbotson performing harmony vocals; the two switched these roles on the last verse.[1]

Recorded versions

First recorded by friend and popular Austin performer Allen Wayne Damron, Walker’s song has been recorded by many popular artists, including Garth Brooks, Kristofer Åström, Chet Atkins, Hugues Aufray (French version, 1984), Harry Belafonte, Bermuda Triangle Band, David Bromberg, Dennis Brown, JJ Cale, David Campbell, Bobby Cole, Edwyn Collins, Jim Croce, Jamie Cullum, King Curtis, Sammy Davis Jr., John Denver, Neil Diamond, Cornell Dupree, Bob Dylan, Arlo Guthrie, Tom T. Hall, John Holt, Whitney Houston, Queen Ifrica, Billy Joel, Dave Jarvis, Elton John, Frankie Laine, Lulu, Rod McKuen, Don McLean, MC Neat, Bebe Neuwirth, Harry Nilsson, Dolly Parton, Johnny Paycheck, Esther Phillips, Ray Quinn, Mike Schank, Helge Schneider, Nina Simone, Todd Snider, Cat Stevens, Jim Stafford, Jud Strunk,[4] Radka Toneff, Robbie Williams and Paul Winter.

A dance choreographed by Bob Fosse to the song appeared in the 1999 West End and Broadway theatre show Fosse, having previously been featured in Fosse’s 1978 show Dancin’.

Furthermore, composer Philip Glass makes reference to “Mr. Bojangles” in his minimalist opera Einstein on the Beach.

Jim Carrey also performed this song in his earlier stand up routines and in his first movie Copper Mountain.

Sammy Davis, Jr performed the song on television, as did William Shatner.

In an episode of The Simpsons titled “Milhouse Doesn’t Live Here Anymore”, Homer sings a version of the song while panhandling.

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“FONTELLA BASS – RESCUE ME – AIR AMERICA MOVIE THEME SONG” – On YouTube

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Fontella Bass(July 3, 1940 – December 26, 2012) was an American R&B soul singer best known for her 1965 hit, “Rescue Me.”

Early life
Fontella Bass was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the daughter of gospel singer Martha Bass (a member of the Clara Ward Singers).[1] She was the older sister of R&B singer David Peaston.[2] At an early age, Fontella showed great musical talent. At the age of five, she provided the piano accompaniment for her grandmother’s singing at funeral services, she sang in her church’s choir at six, and by the time she was nine, she had accompanied her mother on tours throughout the South and Southwest America.

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“Rescue Me”is a rhythm and blues song first recorded and released as a single by Fontella Bass in 1965. The original versions of the record,[1] and BMI,[2] give the songwriting credit to Raynard Miner and Carl William Smith, although many other sources also credit Bass herself as a co-writer.[3][4][5][6][7] It would prove the biggest hit of Bass’s career, reaching #1 on the R&B charts for four weeks and placing at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100.[8] “Rescue Me” also peaked at number eleven on the UK Singles Chart.

Film use
In the Army Now
A Cinderella Story

Air America

Best
I, Robot
Jumpin’ Jack Flash
Sister Act

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