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Category Archives: soul oldies

“Betcha By Golly, Wow” the Stylistics

Betcha by Golly, Wow” is a song written by Thom Bell and Linda Creed that was originally recorded by Connie Stevens as “Keep Growing Strong” on the Bell Records label in 1970. The composition later scored a hit when it was released by the Philadelphia soul group The Stylistics in 1972.
The Stylistics are a Philadelphia soul group that achieved its greatest chart success in the 1970s. They formed in 1968, consisting of singersRussell Thompkins Jr., Herb …

Origin‎: ‎Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S
Past members‎: ‎Russell Thompkins Jr. James Dunn; James Smith; Raymond Johnson; …Members‎: ‎Airrion Love; Herbie Murrell; Harold Eban Brown; Jason Sharp; Michael Muse
Years active‎: ‎1968–presentMembers‎: ‎Airrion Love; Herbie Murrell; Harold Eban Brown; Jason Sharp; Michael Muse
Years active‎: ‎1968–present

Members‎: ‎Airrion Love; Herbie Murrell; Harold Eban Brown; Jason Sharp; Michael Muse
Years active‎: ‎1968–present

Members‎: ‎Airrion Love; Herbie Murrell; Harold Eban Brown; Jason Sharp; Michael Muse
Years active‎: ‎1968–present

 
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Posted by on 04/10 in r&b, soul oldies

 

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“Heart Full Of Love – The Invincibles” 

“Heart Full Of Love – The Invincibles” 
The Courtesy of Pinterest

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The Invincibles: Heart Full Of Love

Soulful soprano voices exist everywhere in Deep Soul music but few reach the stirringly emotional heights of this track from the LA group, The Invincibles. A few singles exist to their name (none being remotely affordable) but even fewer LPs. Well, to be precise, none.

Dave Richardson, Clifton Knight and Lester Johnson recorded their first few singles under Warner Bros. and their R&B subsidiary, Loma. “Heart Full of Love” is backed by and riddled with a noodling guitar of the sunny yet begging “I’ll Come Crawling” and then their relationship troubles continue with 1966’s deep anthem, “Can’t Win” about a guy whose done whatever it takes but just can’t seem to get there. Though these gems are extremely hard to acquire in their original forms,“Heart Full of Love” can be procured through the wonderfully out of print compilation, Soul Over The City, which spotlight’s a for favorites from the historic soul radio station KSOL of San Francisco. words / p dufrene

http://www.aquariumdrunkard.com/2015/09/17/the-invincibles-heart-full-of-love/

 

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“The Originals – Baby I’m for Real (with lyrics)” 

“The Originals – Baby I’m for Real (with lyrics)” 

“Baby, I’m for Real” is a soul balladwritten by Marvin Gaye and Anna Gordy Gaye, produced by Marvin and recorded and released by American Motown vocal group The Originals for the Soul label issued in 1969.

By the late sixties, male vocal quintet the Originals had been recording mostly background vocals for Motown artists most notably backing up brothers Jimmy Ruffin (“What Becomes of the Brokenhearted“) and David Ruffin (“My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)“) respectively. They also were as known for providing background vocals to some of Marvin Gaye‘s late sixties recordings such as “Chained“. But their own singles up until then had failed to generate interest. Having befriended Gaye during recording sessions, the singer promised the group that he’ll find them the hit they were searching for. With music written with his wife Anna, Marvin wrote the lyrics to a song called “The Bells I Hear” by Bobby Taylor with The Originals taking the place of The Vancouvers as background vocalists. Different from most Motown recordings of the period, directed by the psychedelic soulproductions of Norman Whitfield, the song was a return to a back-to-basics doo-wop inspired approach which was championed by Gaye, who took creative control of the recording as the song’s producer. Shelving the song and rewriting it as “Baby I’m For Real” and its follow-up “The Bells”, Gaye had each member of the band provide a lead vocal on each of the verses while also singing along in the background. The singer would also produce another song titled “You’re the One”. While that song failed to chart, he pushed ahead for “…Real”. Gaye had protested to Motown CEO Berry Gordy that he wanted to produce his own material and he used the Originals to help get his point across that he can provide a hit as he eventually did for the Originals as “Baby I’m For Real” reached number one on the Billboard Top Black Singles chart and reached number fourteen on the Pop Singles chart,.[1] eventually selling over a million copies and putting the Originals on the map for a brief period as recording artists. The song’s success paved the way for two more successful Gaye-helmed productions: the follow-up “The Bells” (1970) and “We Can Make It, Baby”.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on 04/10 in r&b, soul oldies

 

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“If You Don’t Know Me By Now – Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes”

“If You Don’t Know Me By Now – Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes”

If You Don’t Know Me by Now” is a song written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and recorded by the Philly soul musical group Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, which became their first hit after being released as a single in 1972 topping the US R&B chart and peaking at number three on the US Pop chart.

The song was originally written for Labelle (a trio led by Patti LaBelle) but they never recorded it. Much like the issue with “I Miss You” and The Dells passing on it, the song’s composers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff gave the song to Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, which featured Teddy Pendergrass as lead vocalist. In addition to the single release, the song was included on their debut album I Miss You.

Patti LaBelle later made the song as part of her concert repertoire in 1982. A live version appears on her 1985 album, Patti.

It was later covered by the English pop/soul band Simply Red, also becoming their best-known hit after reaching number one on the U.S. Hot 100 on July 15, 1989 and at number thirty-eight on the Hot Black Singles chart. It peaked at number two in the UK Singles Chart. It also topped the Canadian Singles Chart. Seal recorded the song for his 2008 album Soul, and, in April 2009, it became his first top-ten Adult Contemporary hit since “Love’s Divine” in 2004; the song was subsequently nominated for the Best Male Pop Vocal Performance Grammy.

Rod Stewart also included this song on his 2009 album Soulbook.

The song was chosen as one of the Songs of the Century by the RIAA. It was featured at the end of Michael Apted’s movie Class Action.

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“These Arms Of Mine ~ Otis Redding”

These Arms Of Mine ~ Otis Redding:

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Otis Ray Redding, Jr. (September 9, 1941 – December 10, 1967) was an American singer-songwriter, record producer, arranger and talent scout. He is considered one of the greatest singers in the history of American popular music and a seminal artist in soul and rhythm and blues. His singing style was powerfully influential among soul artists of 1960s and helped exemplify the Stax sound.

Born and raised in the US state of Georgia, Redding quit school at age 15 to support his family, working with Little Richard’s backing band, the Upsetters, and also performing at talent shows for prize money. In 1958, he joined Johnny Jenkins’s band, the Pinetoppers, and toured the Southern states as a driver and musician. An unscheduled appearance on a Stax recording session led to a contract and his first single, “These Arms of Mine,” in 1962. Stax released Redding’s debut album Pain in My Heart two years later.

Initially popular mainly with African Americans, Redding later reached a wider American popular music audience. Along with his group, he first played small gigs in the American South, then performed in the western states at the popular Los Angeles night club Whisky a Go Go. European appearances included London, Paris and other major cities.

After appearing at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, Redding wrote and recorded his iconic “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” with Steve Cropper. The song became the first posthumous number-one record on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts after his death in a plane crash. The Dock of the Bay became the first posthumous album to reach number one on the UK Albums Chart.

Redding’s premature death devastated Stax. Already on the verge of bankruptcy, the label soon discovered that Atlantic Records owned the rights to his entire song catalog.

Redding received many posthumous accolades, including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He received the honorific nickname King of Soul. In addition to “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,” “Respect” and “Try a Little Tenderness” are among his best-known songs.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Working in the Coal Mine – Lee Dorsey”

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COAL MINING IS DEADLY!

Working in the Coal Mine” is a song with music and lyrics by the American musician and record producer Allen Toussaint. It was an international hit for Lee Dorsey in 1966, and has been recorded by other musicians including Devo in 1981.

Lee Dorsey

After Toussaint returned to New Orleans from the US Army, in which he served from 1963 to 1965, he formed a production company, Sansu (also known as “Tou-Sea Productions”), with partner Marshall Sehorn. He produced a number of singles performed by Lee Dorsey in 1965 and 1966, including “Ride Your Pony” and “Working in the Coal Mine”.[1]

Written and arranged by Toussaint, the song concerns the suffering of a man who rises before 5 o’clock each morning in order to work in a coal mine, five days a week, where the conditions are very harsh and dangerous, but which offers the only prospect of paid employment. The singer repeatedly asks the Lord, “How long can this go on?” and complains that when the weekend arrives, he’s too exhausted to have any fun. In the instrumental section, as in the song’s fade, he says: “Lord, I’m so tired / How long can this go on?” The song features the sound of a pickaxe clinking, as if the musicians were working in a mine. The musicians were the Sansu studio band, including guitarist Roy Montrell, drummer Albert “June” Gardner, and bassist Chuck Badie.[2][3]

It was a hit for Lee Dorsey, released on Amy Records (catalogue number 958), and entered the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 on July 23, 1966, eventually peaking at #8, while reaching #5 on the Billboard R&B chart.[4] It also reached #8 on the UK Singles Chart.[5]

Toussaint said that neither he nor Dorsey had ever been down a coal mine: “We didn’t know anything about a coal mine”. He said of Dorsey: “He was very good to work with. Very inspiring because he had such a happiness about him. He loved what he was doing when he was singing. He was a body and fender man when he wasn’t singing and even at his peak, when he would come off the road at the end of a successful tour, he would go and get into his grease clothes, his dirty work gear and go and work on cars. Straightening out fenders and painting bodywork. But really it was his finest hour when he was singing. He was a very good person for me to work with and he totally trusted me every step of the way.”[6]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Everything I Do Gonh Be Funky (From Now On)”

Lee Dorsey

Dorsey’s songs have been covered by artists as diverse as Petula Clark and Johnny Hallyday (“Ya Ya Twist”, a 1962 French version of “Ya Ya”) and Devo(“Working in the Coal Mine”). “Ya Ya” was covered on John Lennon’s Rock ‘n’ Roll album. “Get Out of My Life, Woman” (1966) was performed often by the Byrds (who based their instrumental “Captain Soul” on it), the Jerry Garcia Band, also predated the boom bap beat of the 90s Hip Hop; and Robert Palmerhad a hit with “Sneakin’ Sally Through The Alley”. His version of the Allen Toussaint song “Everything I Do Gonh Be Funky (From Now On)” is referenced in the Beastie Boys’ song “Sure Shot”, with the lyric “Everything I do is funky like Lee Dorsey.” “Ya Ya” was spoken by Cheech Marin in Cheech and Chong’s Next Movie, as he was waiting for his girlfriend.

https://youtu.be/IdhjlhQ0xYc

 

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