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Category Archives: soul oldies

“The Young Hearts ~ I’ve Got Love For My Baby”

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Biography

An R&B vocal group from Los Angeles, California, USA. Original members were Ronald Preyer, Charles Ingersoll, Earl Carter, and James Moore. The Young Hearts were typical of the falsetto-lead stand-up vocal groups that populated the R&B scene of the late 60s and early 70s. Their impact was purely on the R&B charts, getting moderate hits with ‘I’ve Got Love For My Baby’ (number 19 R&B) in 1968 for the Minit subsidiary of Imperial Records, and ‘Wake Up And Start Standing’ (number 48 R&B) in 1974 for 20th Century. A stay at ABC Records in 1977 produced an album and several singles that did nothing, and the group faded after that.

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The Young Hearts ~ I’ve Got Love For My Baby:

 
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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T09:55:00-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 09:55:00 -0800 31, in black music artists, classic music, music, soul oldies

 

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Pain in My Heart – Otis Redding

Pain in My Heart – Otis Redding

Pain in My Heart is the debut album of soulsinger-songwriter Otis Redding. Redding recorded for Volt Records, a suPain in My Heart is the debut album of soulsinger-songwriter Otis Redding. Redding recorded for Volt Records, a subsidiary of Stax Records, based in Memphis, Tennessee. Volt LPs were initially issued on the Atco label, which released this album (the singles were issued on the Volt label).

The album includes four successful singles, released in 1962 and 1963: \”These Arms of Mine\”, \”That\’s What My Heart Needs\”, \”Security\”, and the title track. Since Billboard did not publish an R&B singles chart from late 1963 to early 1965, the R&B chart peaks of the latter two singles are unknown.[1]bsidiary of Stax Records, based in Memphis, Tennessee.Volt LPs were initially issued on the Atco label, which released this album (the singles were issued on the Volt label).

The album includes four successful singles, released in 1962 and 1963: “These Arms of Mine”, “That’s What My Heart Needs”, “Security”, and the title track. Since Billboard did not publish an R&B singles chart from late 1963 to early 1965, the R&B chart peaks of the latter two singles are unknown.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T08:58:03-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 08:58:03 -0800 31, in r&b, soul oldies

 

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Michael Jackson – WHO’S LOVIN YOU

Who’s Lovin’ You” is a Motown soul song, written in 1960 by William “Smokey” Robinson. The song has been recorded by many different artists including The Miracles, who recorded the 1960 original version, The Temptations, The Supremes, Terence Trent D’arby, Brenda and The Tabulations, John Farnham, Human Nature, En Vogue, Michael Bublé and Giorgia Todrani and Jessica Mauboy. The most famous version is attributed to The Jackson 5. Twelve-year-old singer Shaheen Jafargholi performed the song at Michael Jackson‘s public memorial service in July 2009.

The most famous cover of “Who’s Lovin’ You”, and the one most future covers were based upon, was recorded on August 7, 1969 by The Jackson 5. Michael Jackson was the lead singer on this recording, with his brothers Marlon, Tito, Jermaine, and Jackie on background vocals; Bobby Taylor of The Vancouvers served as producer. The Jackson 5 version of “Who’s Lovin’ You” was one of a number of early recordings the group made at the Hitsville U.S.A. recording studio in Detroit, Michigan, with the Funk Brothers on instrumentation. Just after recording this song, Berry Gordy moved the entire Jackson family to Los Angeles, California to record the hit pop songs he would co-write for the group with The Corporation.

The song was issued as the b-side to The Jackson 5’s first single, “I Want You Back”, which went to #1 on both the pop and R&B charts. A shortened version was included on the first Jackson 5 LP, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5. The original single version was twenty seconds longer, with fewer backing vocals and sparser instrumentation than the album version. The mono single mix was released on Michael’s Love Songs compilation release in 2002.

The Jackson 5 performed this on their first Ed Sullivan Show appearance.[4]

When the group performed the song during their concerts and live performances, Michael usually gave an intro about being really young but knowing about the blues, usually stating how he met the girl during sandbox and sharing cookies, and ended in “I stepped up to her and i said…” the song started from there. In their first concert in Philadelphia, it (along with “I Want You Back”) caused the show to be stopped for several minutes because of such a huge response from the audience. It was a regularly performed/popular song in their set-list from 1970 to early 1972, presumably dropped from the set because of more hits being released and Michael’s voice beginning to change in 1972.

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Posted by on WedAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-13T19:03:01-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesWed, 13 Feb 2019 19:03:01 -0800 31, in pop music/motown, reflections, soul oldies

 

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“Peaches & Herb – Reunited” 

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Peaches & Herb are an American vocalist duo, once comprising Herb Fame (born October 1, 1942) and Francine “Peaches” Hurd Barker (April 28, 1947 – August 13, 2005). Herb has remained a constant in “Peaches & Herb” since its creation in 1966, while seven different women have filled the role of “Peaches.”

History

Herb Fame (born Herbert Feemster, October 1, 1942, in Anacostia, Washington, D.C.), sang in church and neighborhood groups as a child. After graduation from high school, he worked in a local record store where he met record producer Van McCoy and was signed to Columbia subsidiary Date Records by McCoy and A&R executive Dave Kapralik.[1] Francine “Peaches” Barker (born Francine Edna Hurd, April 28, 1947, in Washington, D.C.), using the stage name Francine Day,[2] started a singing trio initially dubbed The Darlettes and later renamed The Sweet Things after a change of record label to Date Records.[3] Having produced two releases for the trio, McCoy decided to record Feemster/Fame and Hurd/Day together at Kapralik’s suggestion.[4][5][6] The resulting single, “We’re in This Thing Together,” was distributed to radio stations but went nowhere for months until December 1966, when a St. Louis disc jockey broadcast the single’s B-side, a revival of the 1934 hit “Let’s Fall in Love.”[5][7]

The new duo, christened “Peaches & Herb,” had a string of successful singles and albums over the next two years such as “Let’s Fall in Love,” “Close Your Eyes,” “For Your Love,” and “Love Is Strange.” Despite burgeoning success and a media image as the “Sweethearts of Soul,” Barker chose to semi-retire from the duo after two years because of the rigors of touring. Marlene Mack (aka Marlene Jenkins), who had sung on the Jaynetts’ hit “Sally Go ‘Round the Roses” and had recorded as Marlina Mars,[8] replaced Barker on stage, but Barker remained on all of the duo’s recordings for Date Records. During this period, the semi-retired “Peaches” also worked as a solo artist using her married name, Francine Barker. She released three singles in total on the Columbia Records label,[3] including “Angels in the Sky” and “Mister DJ.”

Fame retired the act in 1970 when, for personal reasons, he enrolled in the police academy of Washington, D.C. and thereafter joined the city’s police department.[9] Peaches & Herb lay dormant until Fame decided to re-enter the music business in 1976. In his search for a new “Peaches,” Herb again enlisted the assistance of Van McCoy, who suggested that Linda Greene would be suitable for the position. Fame met Greene and concurred, thereby leading to formation of the most successful of the “Peaches & Herb” incarnations to date. Linda’s early musical training (while growing up in Washington, DC) was at The Sewell Music Conservatory.

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Posted by on WedAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-13T17:20:00-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesWed, 13 Feb 2019 17:20:00 -0800 31, in 1970s, American music artists, coffee, duet/duo, entertainment, female vocalist, male vocalist, music, soul oldies

 

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“The Fifth Dimension – One Less Bell to Answer”

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The 5th Dimension is an American popular music vocal group, whose repertoire includes pop, R&B, soul, jazz, light opera and Broadway—the melange was coined as “Champagne Soul.”

Originally known as The Versatiles and formed in late 1965, according to founder, LaMonte McLemore’s currently released autobiographical memoir, the group changed its name to the hipper moniker, The 5th Dimension, by 1966 and became best-known during the late 1960s through early 1970s for popularizing the hits “Up, Up and Away”, “Stoned Soul Picnic”, “Medley: Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)”, “Wedding Bell Blues”, “One Less Bell to Answer”, “(Last Night) I Didn’t Get to Sleep at All”, and The Magic Garden LP.

The five original members were Billy Davis, Jr., Florence LaRue, Marilyn McCoo, LaMonte McLemore, and Ron Townson. They have recorded for several different labels over their long careers. Their first work appeared on the Soul City label, which was started by Imperial Records/United Artists Records recording artist Johnny Rivers. The group would later record for Bell/Arista Records, ABC Records, and Motown Records.

Some of the songwriters popularized by The 5th Dimension went on to careers of their own, especially Ashford & Simpson, who wrote “California Soul”. The group is also notable for having more success with the songs of Laura Nyro than Nyro did herself, particularly with “Stoned Soul Picnic”, “Sweet Blindness”, “Wedding Bell Blues”, “Blowin’ Away”, and “Save the Country”. The group also covered music by well known songwriters such as the song “One Less Bell to Answer”, written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David and the songs and music of Jimmy Webb, who penned their hit “Up, Up and Away”, including an entire recording of Webb songs called The Magic Garden. The 5th Dimension’s famed producer, Bones Howe, utilized Bob Alcivar as the singers’ vocal arranger, as well as The Wrecking Crew, a renowned group of studio musicians including drummer Hal Blaine, for their recording sessions.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-28T09:42:00-08:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 28 Jan 2019 09:42:00 -0800 31, in American music artists, black music artists, classic music, coffee, entertainment, music, r&b, soul oldies

 

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“I Say a Little Prayer” performed by Aretha Franklin. (1960s)

“I Say a Little Prayer” performed by Aretha Franklin. (1960s)

ABOUT THE SONG

“I Say a Little Prayer” is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David for Dionne Warwick, originally peaking at number four on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in December 1967.

Background and
Other recordings

Warwick’s “I Say a Little Prayer” did not appear on the Billboard Easy Listening chart although two instrumental versions of the song were Easy Listening chart items in 1968: the first by Sérgio Mendes at No. 21 in the spring of 1968 while that fall Julius Wechter and the Baja Marimba Band took “I Say a Little Prayer” to No. 10 Easy Listening.

“I Say a Little Prayer” also returned to the Pop & R&B Top Ten in the fall of 1968 via a recording by Aretha Franklin taken from her 1968 Aretha Now album. Franklin and background vocalists the Sweet Inspirations were singing the song for fun while rehearsing the songs intended for the album when the viability of Franklin actually recording “I Say a Little Prayer” became apparent, significantly re-invented from the format of the Dionne Warwick original via the prominence of Clayton Ivey’s piano work and the choral vocals of the Sweet Inspirations. Similar to the history of Warwick’s double-sided hit, the Aretha Franklin version was intended as the B-side of the July 1968 single release “The House that Jack Built” but began to accrue its own airplay that August. Even with “The House That Jack Built” ranking as high as No. 6 (#2 R&B) in September 1968, “I Say a Little Prayer” reached No. 10 (#3 R&B) that October, the same month the single was certified Gold by the RIAA. “Prayer” became Franklin’s ninth and last consecutive Hot 100 top 10 hit on the Atlantic label (not counting every flip side), with each of the nine curiously peaking at a different position. Franklin’s “Prayer” has a special significance in her UK career, as with its September 1968 No. 4 peak it became Franklin’s biggest UK hit; subsequently Franklin has surpassed that track’s UK peak only with her No. 1 collaboration with George Michael, “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)”. In February 1987, UK music weekly New Musical Express published its critics’ top 150 singles of all time, with Franklin’s “I Say a Little Prayer” ranked at No. 1, followed by Al Green’s “Tired of Being Alone” and Warwick’s “Walk On By”. (Franklin’s “I Say a Little Prayer” did not appear in the magazine’s in-house critics’ top 100 singles poll conducted in November 2002.)

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-28T09:10:26-08:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 28 Jan 2019 09:10:26 -0800 31, in American music artists, black music artists, classic music, entertainment, music, r&b, soul oldies

 

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