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Category Archives: smooth jazz

Norah Jones “Don’t Know Why”

Norah Jones “Don’t Know Why”

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“Don’t Know Why” is a song written by Jesse Harris which originally appeared on his 1999 album, Jesse Harris & the Ferdinandos. It was the second single by American singer-songwriter Norah Jones from her debut studio album Come Away with Me (2002). Although Jones’s version only peaked at number thirty on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, it was a critical success for her that helped establish her as a respected new artist, and subsequently her album sold extremely well. The single went on to win three Grammy Awards in 2003 for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. It remains Jones’s biggest hit single in the United States to date, and her only one to reach the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100. The single was also a hit internationally and reached Top 10 in several countries. The song charted at 459 in Blender magazine’s 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born.[2]

A music video directed by Anastasia Simone and Ian Spencer was released in 2002.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-29T11:22:33+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 29 Jun 2018 11:22:33 +0000 31, in female vocalist, pop music, smooth jazz

 

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Kenny G – Don’t Make Me Wait For Love 

Kenny G – Don’t Make Me Wait For Love 

 “Don’t Make Me Wait For Love” is a song by Kenny G (featuring Lenny Williams on lead vocals), and the first single released from his 1986 album Duotones.[1] The song was written and composed by Walter Afanasieff, Preston Glass and Narada Michael Walden.

In the US, “Don’t Make Me Wait For Love” was first released in late 1986 where it only peaked at #77 on the Hot Black Singles chart. Later in 1987 the song’s re-isuue went to reached #17 on the Hot Black Singles chart and #15 on the Hot 100 chart.[2] This was Kenny G’s first Hot 100 Hit. “Don’t Make Met For Wait For Love” had its best showing on the Adult Contemporary music charts, where it peaked at #2.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-22T10:00:39+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 22 Jun 2018 10:00:39 +0000 31, in smooth jazz

 

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“You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine”

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Louis Allen “Lou” Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006) was an American recording artist, voice actor, songwriter, and record producer. He is best known for his singing ability: Frank Sinatra once said that Rawls had “the classiest singing and silkiest chops in the singing game”.[1] Rawls released more than 60 albums, sold more than 40 million records,[2] and had numerous charting singles, most notably his song “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine”. He worked as a television, motion picture, and voice actor. He was also a three-time Grammy-winner, all for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance.

Career

Rawls was born in Chicago on December 1, 1933, and raised by his grandmother in the Ida B. Wells projects on the city’s South Side. He began singing in the Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church choir at the age of seven and later sang with local groups through which he met future music stars Sam Cooke, who was nearly three years older than Rawls, and Curtis Mayfield.[3]

After graduating from Chicago’s Dunbar Vocational High School, he sang briefly with Cooke in the Teenage Kings of Harmony, a local gospel group, and then with the Holy Wonders. In 1951, Rawls replaced Cooke in the Highway QC’s after Cooke departed to join The Soul Stirrers in Los Angeles. Rawls was soon recruited by the Chosen Gospel Singers and moved to Los Angeles, where he subsequently joined the Pilgrim Travelers.[4]

In 1955, Rawls enlisted in the United States Army as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He left the “All-Americans” three years later as a sergeant and rejoined the Pilgrim Travelers (then known as the Travelers). In 1958, while touring the South with the Travelers and Sam Cooke, Rawls was in a serious car crash. Rawls was pronounced dead before arriving at the hospital, where he stayed in a coma for five and a half days. It took him months to regain his memory, and a year to fully recuperate. Rawls considered the event to be life-changing.[4]

Alongside Dick Clark as master of ceremonies, Rawls was recovered enough by 1959 to be able to perform at the Hollywood Bowl. He was signed to Capitol Records in 1962, the same year he sang the soulful background vocals on the Sam Cooke recording of “Bring It On Home to Me” and “That’s Where It’s At,” both written by Cooke. Rawls himself charted with a cover of “Bring It On Home to Me” in 1970 (with the title shortened to “Bring It On Home”).

Rawls’ first Capitol solo release was Stormy Monday (a.k.a. I’d Rather Drink Muddy Water), a jazz album with Les McCann in 1962. The next two Capitol releases did well and used Onzy Matthews as the musical director along with a 17-piece big band; both these albums (Black and Blue, Tobacco Road) charted with Billboard and helped to propel him into the national spotlight as a recording artist.

Though his 1966 album Live! went gold, Rawls would not have a star-making hit until he made a proper soul album, appropriately named Soulin’, later that same year. The album contained his first R&B #1 single, “Love Is a Hurtin’ Thing”. In 1967 Rawls won his first Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance, for the single “Dead End Street.” In 1967, Rawls also performed at the first evening of the Monterey International Pop Music Festival.[6]

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-21T09:24:30+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 21 Jun 2018 09:24:30 +0000 31, in ballad, black music artists, blues, coffee, entertainment, male vocalist, music, r&b, smooth jazz, soul oldies

 

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“Classics IV – Stormy”

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Stormy” is a hit song by the Classics IV released on their LP “Mamas and Papas/Soul Train” in 1968. It entered Billboard Magazine October 26, 1968 peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. This single release along with the prior release of Spooky, and soon after the release of Traces, made great success for the band, apart of the well known songs from the ensemble.[1] The song was covered in 1978 by Santana on the album Inner Secrets.

John Legend, heavily samples the song in his single, “Save Room”.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-14T11:07:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Jun 2018 11:07:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, coffee, entertainment, male vocal group, male vocalist, music, r&b, smooth jazz

 

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“Bobby Caldwell – What You Won’t Do For Love”

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Bobby Caldwell was signed to Miami label TK Records, home to many different kinds of musical acts: the pop-disco of KC & The Sunshine Band, the Latin-flavoured funk of Foxy, the down-home soul of George McCrae and his wife Gwen McCrae, and the futuristic, jazzy disco of Peter Brown.

For this label, Bobby recorded his self-titled solo album, scoring hits with the singles “What You Won’t Do for Love”, “My Flame”, “Can’t Say Goodbye” and, in Britain, “Down for the Third Time.” In order to ensure significant airplay on the African American-dominated R&B radio format of the time, Caldwell’s management took certain steps – such as portraying the artist only in silhouette on the cover and in advertisements – to hide the fact that he was white. The secret was, for obvious reasons, shattered by his first live appearances.

After the tracks were first recorded and the record was considered “complete,” TK owner Henry Stone said that he enjoyed the album but couldn’t hear a hit. Attempting to address this issue, Caldwell and his band re-entered the studio, laying down the song’s now-familiar rhythm tracks. After he quickly penned a set of lyrics, “What You Won’t Do for Love” was born.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-11T12:20:23+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 11 Jun 2018 12:20:23 +0000 31, in 1970s, American music artists, ballad, entertainment, male vocalist, music, smooth jazz

 

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“Brenda Russell – Piano In The Dark”

“Brenda Russell – Piano In The Dark”

Brenda Russell (born Brenda Gordon, April 8, 1949, Brooklyn, New York [1]) is an American-Canadian singer-songwriter and keyboardist. Known for her eclectic musical style, her recordings have encompassed several different genres, including pop, soul, dance and jazz. She is perhaps most well known for her 1988 hit “Piano in the Dark”, and also for writing the song “Get Here” which was a hit for Oleta Adams in 1991. Russell’s songwriting and vocal talents have also been utilized by Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Earth, Wind & Fire, Joni Mitchell, Donna Summer, Bingo Players, Flo Rida and Sting.

Biography

Born to musical parents (her father Gus was a one-time member of The Ink Spots),[2] she spent her early years in Canada after moving to Hamilton, Ontario, age 12.[3] As a teenager she began performing in local bands and was recruited to sing in a Toronto-based girl group called The Tiaras along with Jackie Richardson. The group’s one single, “Where Does All The Time Go” was released on Barry Records in 1968 but was unsuccessful. In her late teens, she joined the Toronto production of Hair, during which time she had begun to play the piano. In the early 1970s she married musician Brian Russell and (as Brian & Brenda) they released two albums on Elton John’s Rocket label, Word Called Love (1976) and Supersonic Lover (1977). The Russells also performed on two tracks from Robert Palmer’s breakout soul-pop album Double Fun. Their daughter, Lindsay, was born in 1977, but the couple had divorced by the late 1970s, and Brenda, now living in Los Angeles, had set out on a solo career.

After Russell was signed to Tommy LiPuma’s Horizon Records (a subsidiary of A&M Records), her debut single, “So Good, So Right”, became a Top 30 hit in 1979. After it disestablished the Horizon imprint in 1979, A&M released Russell’s self-titled debut album. The album included the hit “So Good, So Right” as well as the tracks “In The Thick Of It” and “If Only For One Night” (which was later a hit in 1985 for Luther Vandross). Her second album, Love Life, followed in 1981, though commercial success eluded her. Moving to Warner Bros. Records, she released her third album, Two Eyes, in 1983, but this was also unsuccessful. After this, Russell relocated to Sweden and began writing songs for her next album.[4]

Returning to A&M Records, Russell’s fourth album, Get Here, was released in 1988. It became her greatest commercial success, spawning her biggest hit “Piano in the Dark” (a US Top 10 hit which featured Joe Esposito) and garnered three Grammy Award nominations. The title track went on to become a worldwide hit in 1991 when it was covered by Oleta Adams. After releasing her next album, Kiss Me with the Wind (1990), Russell’s contract with A&M concluded with the release of her Greatest Hits album in 1992. Russell then signed with EMI and released the album Soul Talkin’ in 1993. After this, Russell took some time off from recording her own music and during this period she composed songs for other artists and contributed to the score for the film How Stella Got Her Groove Back, written by Michel Colombier.[5] She also appeared in the 1999 film Liberty Heights, in which she performed two songs written especially for the movie.

Russell resumed her solo career in 2000 with the album Paris Rain, released on Hidden Beach Records. The album (which includes collaborations with Carole King, Dave Koz and Sheila E.) saw Russell move away from the pop market toward a more adult-oriented sound.[6] In 2003, she signed to the new UK label Dome Records and released the compilation album So Good, So Right: The Best of Brenda Russell. Her eighth studio album, Between the Sun and the Moon, was released by Dome in 2004.

2005 saw a Broadway musical version of Alice Walker’s The Color Purple. Produced by Oprah Winfrey, the show’s score was written by Russell and lyricists-composers Allee Willis and Stephen Bray. Russell and her co-writers were nominated for a Tony Award (for Best Score) and a Grammy Award (in the Best Musical Show Album category).[7]

In November 2009, three tracks from Russell’s ninth studio album, This Is Real Life, were made available via her official site[8] though a release date for the album is yet to be announced.

In 2011, the Dutch dance duo Bingo Players released a dance track entitled “Cry (Just a Little)” which featured a sample of Russell’s 1988 hit “Piano in the Dark”. In 2012, rapper Flo Rida released the song “I Cry” with the same sample and a similar beat.

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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-10T09:20:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 10 Jun 2018 09:20:00 +0000 31, in black music artists, smooth jazz

 

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“JAMES INGRAM – GIVE ME FOREVER”

“JAMES INGRAM – GIVE ME FOREVER”

James Edward Ingram (born February 16, 1952)[1] is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and instrumentalist. He is a two-time Grammy Award-winner and a two-time Academy Award nominee for Best Original Song.
Since beginning his career in 1973, Ingram has charted eight Top 40 hits on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart from the early 1980suntil the early 1990s, as well as thirteen top 40 hits on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. In addition, he charted 20 hits on the Adult Contemporary chart (including two number-ones). He had two number-one singles on the Hot 100: the first, a duet with fellow R&B artist Patti Austin, 1982’s “Baby, Come to Me” topped the U.S. pop chart in 1983; “I Don’t Have the Heart“, which became his second number-one in 1990 was his only number-one as a solo artist. In between these hits, he also recorded the song “Somewhere Out There” with fellow recording artist Linda Ronstadt for the animated film An American Tail. The song and the music video both became gigantic hits. Ingram co-wrote “The Day I Fall in Love”, from the motion picture Beethoven’s 2nd(1993), and singer Patty Smyth’s “Look What Love Has Done”, from the motion picture Junior (1994), which earned him nominations for Best Original Song from the Oscars, Golden Globe, and Grammy Awards in 1994 and 1995.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-04T13:15:21+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 04 Jun 2018 13:15:21 +0000 31, in male vocalist, music, smooth jazz

 

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