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Category Archives: r&b

“Tony Orlando & Dawn – Knock Three Times”

Tony Orlando and Dawn is an American pop music group that was popular in the 1970s. Their signature hits include “Candida“, “Knock Three Times“, “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree“, “Say, Has Anybody Seen My Sweet Gypsy Rose“, and “He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You).

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:00:33+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:00:33 +0000 31, in 1970s, pop music, r&b

 

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“Stand By Me, Ben E. King, 1961”

“Stand By Me, Ben E. King, 1961”

Benjamin Earl King (born Benjamin Earl Nelson, September 28, 1938 – April 30, 2015), known as Ben E. King, was an American soul and R&B singer and record producer. He was perhaps best known as the singer and co-composer of “Stand by Me“—a US Top 10 hit, both in 1961 and later in 1986 (when it was used as the theme to the film of the same name), a number one hit in the UK in 1987, and no. 25 on the RIAA‘s list of Songs of the Century—and as one of the principal lead singers of the R&B vocal group the Drifters notably singing the lead vocals of one of their biggest global hit singles (and only U.S. #1 hit) “Save the Last Dance for Me“.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T09:33:30+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 09:33:30 +0000 31, in 1960s, male vocalist, music, r&b

 

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“BILLY PRESTON – WILL IT GO ROUND IN CIRCLES…”

“BILLY PRESTON – WILL IT GO ROUND IN CIRCLES…”

“Will It Go Round in Circles” is a song written by Bruce Fisher and Billy Preston, and recorded by Preston for his 1972 album Music Is My Life. On its release as a single in 1973, the song was a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for two weeks, and sold over a million copies. The song was one of two number-one solo hits for Preston, the other being “Nothing from Nothing”, although he is also credited on The Beatles’ 1969 hit “Get Back”.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T09:30:21+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 09:30:21 +0000 31, in black music artists, male vocalist, Monday Madness, r&b

 

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“BETTYE SWANN – MAKE ME YOURS WITH LYRICS”

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“Make Me Yours” is a 1967 song written by Bettye Swann (Betty Jean Champion) and produced by Arthur Wright,[1] which became a crossover hit for the Louisiana-born Swann. The single went to number one on the Billboard “Hot R&B” chart for two weeks in July 1967 and also peaked at number twenty-one on the pop singles chart.[2]

Betty Barton (born Betty Jean Champion; October 24, 1944), better known by the stage name Bettye Swann, is a retired American singer. She is best known for her 1967 hit song “Make Me Yours”.

She was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, one of 14 children. She grew up in Arcadia, Louisiana, and moved to Los Angeles, California in 1963. Although some sources state that she was in a vocal group known as The Fawns who recorded for Money Records in 1964, she has refuted this, saying that she sang with a trio in Arcadia by that name.[1]

In 1964, she started a solo singing career, changing her name to Bettye Swann at the prompting of local DJ Al Scott, who became her manager. After a minor hit with the self-penned “Don’t Wait Too Long”, her big breakthrough came with “Make Me Yours”, which topped the Billboard R&B charts in July 1967 and made #21 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] In 1968, she split with Scott, moved to Georgia, won a new contract with Capitol Records, and had another hit in 1969 with her cover of the Jeannie Seely hit “Don’t Touch Me” (#14 R&B, #38 Hot 100).

In 1972, she transferred to Atlantic Records and had a couple of minor hits with “Victim of a Foolish Heart” (later covered by Joss Stone) and Merle Haggard’s “Today I Started Loving You Again”. After leaving Money records she lived for a short time in Athens, Georgia.[1] She continued to record until the mid-1970s, but with little commercial success.

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-05T11:20:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 05 Jan 2019 11:20:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, female vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

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“Average White Band – Cut The Cake Full LP 1975”

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Average White Band (also AWB) are a Scottish funk and R&B band that had a series of soul and disco hits between 1974 and 1980. They are best known for their million-selling instrumental track “Pick Up the Pieces”, and their albums AWB and Cut the Cake. The band name was initially proposed by Bonnie Bramlett. They have influenced others such as the Brand New Heavies, and been sampled by various musicians including the Beastie Boys, TLC, The Beatnuts, Too Short, Ice Cube, Eric B. & Rakim, Nas, and A Tribe Called Quest, as well as Arrested Development[1] – making them the fifteenth most sampled act in history.[2] As of 2012, forty years after their formation, they continue to perform.

Career

AWB was formed in early 1972[3] by Alan Gorrie,[4] and Malcolm “Molly” Duncan, with Onnie McIntyre,[5] Michael Rosen (trumpet), Roger Ball, and Robbie McIntosh[6] joining them in the original line-up. Hamish Stuart[7] quickly replaced Rosen. Duncan and Ball, affectionately known as the Dundee Horns, studied at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art (now part of the University of Dundee, but which at the time was part of the Dundee Institute of Art & Technology, now known as Abertay University), and were previously members of Mogul Thrash. Gorrie and McIntyre had been members of Forever More. McIntyre and McIntosh were used as session musicians on Chuck Berry’s recording of “My Ding-a-Ling”.[3]

The band’s breakthrough was a support slot at Eric Clapton’s comeback concert in 1973. MCA Records released their debut album, Show Your Hand (1973), which sold poorly.[8] Bruce McCaskill, who was Clapton’s tour manager, liked the band’s music and agreed to manage them. He borrowed money to take them to the US and to promote them. McCaskill had many contacts from his days with Clapton and managed to get Atlantic Records to sign them. The band relocated to Los Angeles and released the follow-up, AWB, better known as The White Album. It reached #1 and was the first of many with renowned producer Arif Mardin.[8]

McIntosh died of a heroin overdose at a Los Angeles party on 23 September 1974.[1][8] Gorrie also overdosed, but Cher kept him conscious until medical help arrived.[9] The NME reported in January 1975 that AWB played a benefit show for McIntosh’s widow at the Marquee Club in London.[10] McIntosh was replaced by Steve Ferrone (previously of Bloodstone), and, like McIntosh, previously with Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express.[1]

In 1975, the single “Pick Up the Pieces” – taken from the No. 1 AWB album – reached No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song knocked Linda Ronstadt’s “You’re No Good” out of No. 1 and sold over one million copies. It was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in March 1975.[11] It also prompted The J.B.’s, the backup band of the “Godfather of Soul”, James Brown, to record and release a song in reply, “Pick Up the Pieces, One by One”, under the name AABB (Above Average Black Band). It was both a tribute to AWB’s knowledge of funk and a tongue-in-cheek play on the Scottish band’s name.

AWB followed up with the LPs Cut the Cake (1975) and Soul Searching (1976), both big sellers and yielding further Top 40 singles. Cut the Cake was dedicated by the surviving band members to McIntosh’s memory. Their next LP, Benny & Us, was a collaboration with Ben E. King.[8]

After several more albums, AWB’s audience and sales dwindled. Their 1980 disco hit “Let’s Go Round Again” (UK #12),[12] was covered in the late 1990s by Louise. The group initially disbanded by 1983.

Ferrone went on to work with Duran Duran whilst Hamish Stuart joined Paul McCartney’s touring group.[8] In 1985 Gorrie released a solo album, Sleepless Nights.

Gorrie, McIntyre, and Ball reunited in 1989 to record Aftershock. Alex Ligertwood (ex-Santana and Jeff Beck Group) also appeared on this album replacing lead singer Hamish Stuart, along with Eliot Lewis who co-wrote with Gorrie and joined the band as well. Ligertwood left after the album’s recording and drummer Tiger McNeil joined for the reunited band’s live shows. McNeil was with the group until 1994. He was then succeeded by Peter Abbott (ex-Blood Sweat and Tears), who in turn was replaced by Fred “Catfish” Alias in September 1998. Drummer Adam Deitch did a two-year stint with AWB from 1999 to 2001.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T10:52:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 10:52:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music, male vocal group, r&b

 

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“Sister Sledge – We Are Family”

“Sister Sledge – We Are Family”

Sister Sledge is an American musical vocal group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formed in 1971, the group consisted of sisters Debbie, Joni, Kim and Kathy Sledge. Symbolizing strong family values, the siblings achieved international success at the height of the disco era. The year 1979 saw the release of their breakthrough album We Are Family, which peaked at number three on the US Album Chart and went Platinum. The album included the 1979 single “We Are Family” which reached number two on the US Billboard Hot 100 and earned them a Grammy Award nomination, together with two other 1979 top 20 international hits “He’s the Greatest Dancer” and “Lost in Music“.
Their other US hits include a 1982 remake of Mary Wells’ 1964 hit, “My Guy“, and other international hits include “Mama Never Told Me” (1973), “Thinking of You” (1984), before reaching number one on the UK Singles Chartwith the song “Frankie” in 1985. Remixed versions of three of their singles in 1993 returned them to the UK Top 20. Although Kathy embarked on a solo career in 1989, she continued to tour with the group (with Kathy occasionally re-joining for one-off performances and several releases in the 1990s). In 2015, Sister Sledge performed for Pope Francis at the World Festival of Families in Philadelphia.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T10:27:36+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 10:27:36 +0000 31, in female vocal group, music, r&b

 

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“Aretha Franklin – The Weight (with lyrics)”

“Aretha Franklin – The Weight (with lyrics)”

“The Weight” is a song originally by the Canadian-American group, The Band that was released as Capitol Records single 2269 in 1968 and on the group’s debut album Music from Big Pink. Written by Band member Robbie Robertson, the song is about a visitor’s experiences in a town mentioned in the lyric’s first line as Nazareth. “The Weight” has significantly influenced American popular music, having been listed as #41 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time published in 2004.[1] Pitchfork Media named it the 13th best song of the Sixties,[2] and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame named it one of the 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.[3] PBS, which broadcast performances of the song in “Ramble at the Ryman” (2011), “Austin City Limits” (2012),[4] and “Quick Hits” (2012),[5] describes it as “a masterpiece of Biblical allusions, enigmatic lines and iconic characters” and notes its enduring popularity as “an essential part of the American songbook.”[5]

“The Weight”

is one of The Band’s best known songs though it was not a significant mainstream hit for the group in the U.S., peaking at only #63.[6] The Band’s recording fared much better in Canada and the UK – in those countries, the single was a top 40 hit, peaking at #35 in Canada and #21 in the UK in 1968. However, the song’s popularity was greatly enhanced by three cover releases in 1968 and 1969 with arrangements that appealed to a diversity of music audiences. Aretha Franklin’s 1969 soul music arrangement was included in her This Girl’s in Love with You album, which peaked in the U.S. at #19 and #3 on the soul chart, and peaked in Canada at #12.[7] Jackie DeShannon’s 1968 pop music arrangement, debuting on the Hot 100 one week before The Band’s, peaked at #55 in the U.S., #35 in Canada. A joint single rhythm and blues arrangement released by Diana Ross & the Supremes and The Temptations in 1969, hit #46 in the U.S. and #36 in Canada. The Band’s and Jackie DeShannon’s versions never mentioned the title. The Band’s version credits Jaime Robbie Robertson, Rick Danko, Richard Manuel, Garth Hudson, Levon Helm on the record label, rather than The Band.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T10:23:42+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 10:23:42 +0000 31, in American music artists, female vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

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