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Category Archives: r&b

“BILLY STEWART-SUMMERTIME”

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Billy Stewart (March 24, 1937 – January 17, 1970) was an American musical artist, with a highly distinctive scat-singing style, who enjoyed popularity in the 1960s.

Biography

Stewart was 12 years old when he began singing with his younger brothers Johnny, James, and Frank as The 4 Stewart Brothers, and later went on to get their own radio show every Sunday for five years at WUST-AM in Washington, D.C. He was a graduate of Armstrong High School. [1]

Stewart made the transition to secular music by filling in occasionally for The Rainbows, a D.C. area vocal group led by the future soul star, Don Covay. It was also through The Rainbows that Stewart met another aspiring singer, Marvin Gaye. Rock and roller Bo Diddley has been credited with discovering Stewart playing piano in Washington, D.C. in 1956 and inviting him to be one of his backup musicians.[citation needed]

By 1955, this led to a recording contract with Diddley’s label, Chess Records and Diddley played guitar on Stewart’s 1956 recording of “Billy’s Blues”. A strong seller in Los Angeles, “Billy’s Blues” reached the sales top 25 in Variety magazine. Stewart then moved to Okeh Records and recorded “Billy’s Heartache”, backed by the Marquees, another D.C. area group which featured Marvin Gaye.

Back at Chess in the early 1960s, Stewart began working with A&R man Billy Davis. He recorded a song called “Fat Boy” and then had additional success with his recordings of “Reap What You Sow” and “Strange Feeling”, both making the Billboard Hot 100 and the Top 30 in the R&B charts. Major chart success was not far away and in 1965, Stewart recorded two self-written songs, “I Do Love You” (#6 R&B, #26 Pop), which featured his brother Johnny Stewart as one of the backing vocalists with his partner James English, and “Sitting in the Park” (#4 R&B, #24 Pop). His idiosyncratic improvisational technique of doubling-up, scatting his words and trilling his lips made his style unique in the 1960s.[citation needed]

In 1966, Stewart recorded the LP Unbelievable. The first single released from that album was Stewart’s radical interpretation of the George Gershwin song, “Summertime”, a Top 10 hit on both the pop and R&B charts. The follow-up single was Stewart’s cover version of the Doris Day hit “Secret Love”, which reached the Pop Top 30 and just missed the Top 10 on the R&B chart.

Stewart continued to record throughout the remainder of the 1960s on Chess without major success. A weight problem worsened, and he developed diabetes. Stewart suffered minor injuries in a motorcycle accident in 1969.

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Posted by on May 22, 2017 in male vocalist, r&b

 

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“Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom (Central Park 1980)”

“Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom (Central Park 1980)”

“Philadelphia Freedom” is a song released by The Elton John Band as a single in 1975. The song was one of Elton John’s seven #1 US hits during the early and mid-1970s, which saw his recordings dominating the charts. In Canada, it was his eighth single to hit the top of the RPM national singles chart.

The song was written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin as a favour to John’s friend, tennis star Billie Jean King. King was part of the Philadelphia Freedoms professional tennis team. The song features an orchestral arrangement by Gene Page, including flutes, horns, and strings.

The song made its album debut on 1977’s Elton John’s Greatest Hits Volume II. The Unedited version (without an early fade out) appears only on the box set To Be Continued…. and the remaster for Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.

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“The Rolling Stones – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

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“Miss You Like Crazy, lyrics- Natalie Cole”

“Miss You Like Crazy, lyrics- Natalie Cole”

 Image credit:  muhammad lutfi

Miss You Like Crazy” is a song recorded by Natalie Cole and released in 1989 from her album Good to Be Back. The song is a moving ballad in which the singer describes how she is feeling lonely and is longing for the one she misses “like crazy” (or, in other words, very much).
Miss You Like Crazy” was a huge hit for Cole, becoming her fifth Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, where the song peaked at #7. The song also topped both the R&B and adult contemporary charts in 1989, as well as reaching #2 on the UK Singles Chart. In Canada, the song peaked at number 19 for two weeks at the end of June.[1]

Miss You Like Crazy” is ranked as the 67th biggest US hit of 1989.[2]

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“The Beatles – Long and Winding Road (1970)”

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The Long and Winding Road” is a ballad written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) from the Beatles’ album Let It Be. It became the group’s 20th and last number-one song in the United States in June 1970,[2] and was the last single released by the quartet.

While the released version of the song was very successful, the post-production modifications by producer Phil Spector angered McCartney to the point that when he made his case in court for breaking up the Beatles as a legal entity, he cited the treatment of “The Long and Winding Road” as one of six reasons for doing so. New versions of the song with simpler instrumentation were subsequently released by both the Beatles and McCartney.

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Posted by on May 19, 2017 in male vocal group, music, r&b

 

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“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie”

In 1962, while playing a gig at the Pypo Club in Seaside, Oregon, then managed by Al Dardis, the band noticed Rockin’ Robin Roberts’s version of

“Louie Louie”

being played on the jukebox for hours on end. The entire club would get up and dance.Ely convinced the Kingsmen to learn the song, which they played at dances to a great crowd response. Unknown to him, he changed the beat because he misheard it on a jukebox. Ken Chase, host of radio station KISN, formed his own club to capitalize on these dance crazes. Dubbed the “Chase”, the Kingsmen became the club’s house band and Ken Chase became the band’s manager. On April 5, 1963, Chase booked the band an hour-long session at the local Northwestern Inc. studio for the following day. The band had just played a 90-minute

“Louie Louie”

marathon.

Despite the band’s annoyance at having so little time to prepare, on April 6 at 10 am the Kingsmen walked into the three-microphone recording studio. In order to sound like a live performance, Ely was forced to lean back and sing to a microphone suspended from the ceiling. “It was more yelling than singing,” Ely said, “’cause I was trying to be heard over all the instruments.” In addition, he was wearing braces at the time of the performance, further compounding his infamously slurred words. Ely sang the beginning of the third verse several bars too early, but realized his mistake and waited for the rest of the band to catch up. In what was thought to be a warm-up, the song was recorded in its first and only take. The Kingsmen were not proud of the version, but their manager liked the rawness of their cover. The B-side was “Haunted Castle”, composed by Ely and Don Gallucci, the new keyboardist. However, Lynn Easton was credited on both the Jerden and Wand releases. The entire session cost $50, and the band split the cost.

“Louie Louie” was kept from the top spot on the charts in late 1963 and early 1964 by the Singing Nun and Bobby Vinton, who monopolized the No.1 slot for four weeks apiece. The Kingsmen single reached No. 1 on the Cashbox chart and No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Additionally in the UK it reached No. 26 on the Record Retailer chart. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

The band attracted nationwide attention when “Louie Louie” was banned by the governor of Indiana, Matthew E. Welsh, also attracting the attention of the FBI because of alleged indecent lyrics in their version of the song. The lyrics were, in fact, innocent, but Ely’s baffling enunciation permitted teenage fans and concerned parents alike to imagine the most scandalous obscenities. All of this attention only made the song more popular. In April 1966 “Louie Louie” was reissued and once again hit the music charts, reaching No. 65 on the Cashbox chart and No. 97 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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“Colbie Caillat – Bubbly”

“Colbie Caillat – Bubbly”

Colbie Marie Caillat (i/ˈkoʊlbi kəˈleɪ/; born May 28, 1985) is an American pop singer-songwriter and acoustic guitarist from Malibu, California. She debuted in 2007 with Coco, which included hit singles “Bubbly” and “Realize”. In 2008, she recorded a duet with Jason Mraz, “Lucky”, which won a Grammy. Caillat released her second album, Breakthrough, in August 2009. Breakthrough was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album at the 2010 Grammy Awards. She was also part of the group that won Album of the Year at the 2010 Grammys for her background vocals and writing on Taylor Swift’s Fearless album.

Caillat has sold over 6 million albums worldwide and over 10 million singles. In 2009, she was named Billboard magazine’s 94th-best-selling music artist of the 2000–2009 decade.[1] In 2011, she released her third studio album, All of You. On October 23, 2012 she released her first Christmas album, Christmas in the Sand.

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