RSS

Category Archives: r&b

“Bob Seger – We’ve Got Tonight (The Wonder years)”

“We’ve Got Tonite” (sic) is a song written by American Bob Seger, from his 1978 album Stranger in Town. It was a hit single for Seger and the Silver Bullet Band, reaching No. 13 on the U.S. pop charts. In the UK, it reached No. 41 in 1979, later making it to No. 22 during a 1995 re-release to promote a Greatest Hits album, while in 1982 a live version from the in-concert album Nine Tonight reached No. 60.

It also played in the background of Melissa Sue Anderson’s 1979 TV film Survival of Dana, in a scene where Anderson’s character was visiting one of her new friends’ homes and was in a room with co-star Robert Carradine’s character Donny Davis, whom she was falling for.[1]

en.m.Wikipedia.com

 

Tags: ,

“Van Morrison – Brown Eyed Girl (Original Version)”

“Van Morrison – Brown Eyed Girl (Original Version)”

Sir George Ivan “Van” Morrison, OBE[1] (born 31 August 1945) is a Northern Irish singer-songwriter and musician. Some of his recordings, such as the studio albums Astral Weeks and Moondance and the live album It’s Too Late to Stop Now, are critically acclaimed. He has received six Grammy Awards, the 1994 Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music, and has been inducted into both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2015 he was knighted for his services to popular music.

Known as “Van the Man” to his fans, Morrison started his professional career when, as a teenager in the late 1950s, he played a variety of instruments including guitar, harmonica, keyboards and saxophone for various Irish showbands covering the popular hits of the day. He rose to prominence in the mid-1960s as the lead singer of the Northern Irish R&B band Them, with whom he recorded the garage band classic “Gloria”. His solo career began under the pop-hit oriented guidance of Bert Berns with the release of the hit single “Brown Eyed Girl” in 1967. After Berns’ death, Warner Bros. Records bought out his contract and allowed him three sessions to record Astral Weeks in 1968.[2] Even though this album would gradually garner high praise, it was initially a poor seller; however, the next one, Moondance, established Morrison as a major artist,[3] and throughout the 1970s he built on his reputation with a series of critically acclaimed albums and live performances. Morrison continues to record and tour, producing albums and live performances that sell well and are generally warmly received, sometimes collaborating with other artists, such as Georgie Fame and the Chieftains. In 2008 he performed Astral Weeks live for the first time since 1968.

Much of Morrison’s music is structured around the conventions of soul music and R&B, such as the popular singles “Brown Eyed Girl”, “Jackie Wilson Said (I’m in Heaven When You Smile)”, “Domino” and “Wild Night”. An equal part of his catalogue consists of lengthy, loosely connected, spiritually inspired musical journeys that show the influence of Celtic tradition, jazz, and stream-of-consciousness narrative, such as Astral Weeks and lesser-known works such as Veedon Fleece and Common One.[4][5] The two strains together are sometimes referred to as “Celtic Soul”.[6]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
2 Comments

Posted by on June 24, 2017 in music, pop music, r&b

 

Tags: ,

“Carl Carlton- Everlasting Love”

image

Carlton began his career in the mid-1960’s as “Little Carl” Carlton. This was a marketing ploy to capitalize on some vocal similarities to Stevie Wonder, who recorded under the name “Little Stevie Wonder” in the early 1960’s. His first recordings were for Lando Records, for which he recorded some minor local hits, including “So What” and “Don’t You Need A Boy Like Me.” In 1968, Carlton was signed by Don D. Robey to his new label, Back Beat Records. Shortly after signing with the label, Carlton relocated to Houston, Texas to be closer to his new label. His first single with the label, “Competition Ain’t Nothing” became a huge hit on the UK northern soul scene after its release on the UK Action label. Carlton finally saw major success in the United States with a cover version of Robert Knight’s “Everlasting Love.” This song went to #6 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, and #11 on the Billboard R&B Charts in 1974.

Robey sold his labels to ABC Records in 1972. Beginning in 1976, Carlton became embroiled in a royalty dispute with ABC Records that caused him to stop recording for some time. He then signed with Mercury Records in 1977, but only released one single on that label. Carlton was unable to land a new recording contract for several years until Leon Haywood helped him get a singles deal with 20th Century Records.

A Haywood-penned single, “She’s A Bad Mama Jama (She’s Built, She’s Stacked)”, became a major hit, peaking at #2 on the soul chart and earning Carlton a Grammy Award nomination for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male. in 1982. The track peaked at #34 in the UK Singles Chart. Carlton’s subsequent album, Carl Carlton, went gold in 1981. “She’s a Bad Mama Jama” has since become a staple of compilation albums and soundtracks and is often sampled in rap music.

Carlton released several more albums in the 1980s but had only a few minor R&B hits. After 1985’s Private Property, he did not release another album until 1994’s Main Event, which also failed to chart.

In late 2002, Carlton appeared with many R&B stars on the “Rhythm, Love, and Soul” edition of the PBS series American Soundtrack. His performance of “Everlasting Love” was included on the accompanying live album that was released in 2004.

On August 1, 2010, Carlton released his first gospel single entitled: “God is Good”. He is currently in the studio completing his yet to be titled new album. On April 16, 2011, Carlton was nominated for a Detroit Music Award in the “Outstanding Gospel/Christian Vocalist” category.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

Tina Turner – You’d Better Be Good To Me

Tina Turner – You’d Better Be Good To Me

Better Be Good to Me” is a hit rock song, written by Mike ChapmanNicky Chinn and Holly Knight, featured on Tina Turner‘s fifth studio albumPrivate Dancer (1984). The song was originally recorded and released in 1981 by Spider, a band from New York City with co-writer Holly Knight as a member. Tina Turner’s version was successful in the United States on the Hot 100 and the US R&B/Hip-Hop chart. It peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and number six on the US R&B/Hip-hop chart. At the 27th Grammy Awards in 1985, it won Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female, one of four Grammys awarded to Turner in that ceremony.[1]

 
8 Comments

Posted by on June 19, 2017 in female vocalist, music, r&b, rock

 

Tags: ,

“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me (Lyrics) – George Michael feat. Elton John”

“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me (Lyrics) – George Michael feat. Elton John”

Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” is a song written by English singer-songwriter Elton John and his lyricist Bernie Taupin. It was released as the first single from Elton John’s 1974 album Caribou; it was released that year during the latter half of May in the United Kingdom, and on 10 June in the United States. The song found further success in 1991 in a version recorded live as a duet between John and George Michael which reached number 1 in the UK and US.

1974 Elton John version

Lyrics and music
In the song, Elton sings to someone he has helped and from whom he is now experiencing rejection:

I took a chance and changed your way of life
but you misread my meaning when I met you
closed the door and left me blinded by the light
don’t let the sun go down on me
although I search myself, it’s always someone else I see.
I’d just allow a fragment of your life to wander free
but losing everything is like the sun going down on me.

It was written with the other songs on the album during a ten-day period in January 1974.

The chorus of the song is supported with a horn arrangement by Del Newman, and features backing vocals of the Beach Boys’ Carl Wilson and Bruce Johnston, and Toni Tennille. Also on the song are percussion accents provided by Ray Cooper and a mellotron played by Dave Hentschel.

“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” charted on 1 June 1974 in Great Britain, making it to number 16 and reached the Top 10 after four weeks. On 10 August, the song’s two-week stay at number 2 ended. In the U.S., it was certified Gold on 6 September 1974 by the RIAA. In Canada, it reached number 1, becoming his fifth chart topper in that country.[1]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
8 Comments

Posted by on June 19, 2017 in 1970s, duet, male vocalist, r&b, songwriter

 

Tags: ,

NO DOUBT… “IT’S MY LIFE !” 

NO DOUBT… “IT’S MY LIFE !” 

No Doubt is an American rock band from Anaheim, California, that formed in 1986. Since 1995, the group has consisted of vocalist Gwen Stefani, guitarist and keyboardist Tom Dumont, bassist and keyboardist Tony Kanal, and drummer Adrian Young. Since the mid-1990s in live performances they have been supported by trumpeter Stephen Bradley and trombonist Gabrial McNair.

The ska sound of their first album No Doubt (1992) failed to make an impact. The Beacon Street Collection (1996) is a raw expression of their sound, inspired by ska punk and released independently by the band under their own record label. The album sold over 100,000 copies in 1995, over three times as many as their first album sold. The band’s diamond-certified album Tragic Kingdom (1995) helped launch the third-wave ska revival of the 1990s, and “Don’t Speak”, the third single from the album, set a record when it spent 16 weeks at the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay chart.

The group’s next album, Return of Saturn (2000), despite the Top 40 hit single “Simple Kind of Life”, did not match the success of their previous but received critical praise and was nominated for Best Rock Album at the 43rd Grammy Awards. Fifteen months later, the band reappeared with Rock Steady (2001), which incorporated reggae and dancehall music into their work. The album was primarily recorded in Jamaica and featured collaborations with Jamaican artists Bounty Killer, Sly and Robbie, and Lady Saw. The album produced two Grammy-winning singles, “Hey Baby” and “Underneath It All”, as well as “Hella Good.” On 22 November 2002, No Doubt received the Key to the City of Anaheim, given by the Mayor of Anaheim, Tom Daly in Disneyland during the band’s appearance on ‘Breakfast with Kevin and Bean’ (KROQ-FM) where they performed five songs.[2] After a 2004 tour the band embarked on solo projects, with Stefani releasing two successful solo albums Love. Angel. Music. Baby. (2004) and The Sweet Escape (2006) while Tom Dumont released his own solo music project, Invincible Overlord. In 2008, the band resumed working slowly on their sixth effort, titled Push and Shove (2012), and released their single “Settle Down”. They have sold over 33 million albums worldwide.

http://www.nodoubt.com/biography

 

Tags:

“La Bamba by Ritchie Valens (with English & Spanish lyrics)” 

La Bamba, pronounced: [la ˈβamba] is a Mexican folk songoriginally from the state of Veracruz, best known from a 1958 adaptation by Ritchie Valens, a top 40 hit in the U.S. charts and one of early rock and roll’s best-known songs. Valens’ version of “La Bamba” is ranked number 354 on Rolling Stone magazine′s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It is the only song on the list sung in a language other than English.

“La Bamba” has been covered by numerous artists, most notably by Los Lobos, whose version was the title track of the 1987 film La Bamba and reached No. 1 in the U.S. and UK singles charts in the same year. The Los Lobos version remained No. 1 for three weeks in the summer of 1987. The music video for Los Lobos’ version, directed by Sherman Halsey, won the 1988 MTV Video Music Award for Best Video from a Film.

“La Bamba” is a classic example of the Son Jarocho musical style, which originated in the Mexican state of Veracruz and combines Spanishindigenous, and African musical elements. The song is typically played on one or two arpas jarochas (harps) along with guitar relatives the jarana jarocha and the requinto jarocho.[1]Lyrics to the song vary greatly, as performers often improvise verses while performing. However, versions such as those by musical groups Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan and Los Pregoneros del Puerto have survived because of the artists’ popularity. The traditional aspect of “La Bamba” lies in the tune, which remains almost the same through most versions. The name of the dance, which has no direct English translation, is presumably connected with the Spanish verb bambolear, meaning “to shake” or perhaps “to stomp”.

A traditional huapango song, “La Bamba” is often played during weddings in Veracruz, where the bride and groom perform the accompanying dance. Today this wedding tradition is observed less often than in the past, but the dance is still popular, perhaps through the popularity of ballet folklórico. The dance is performed displaying the newly wed couple’s unity through the performance of complicated, delicate steps in unison as well as through creation of a bow from a listón, a long red ribbon, using only their feet.

The “arriba” (literally “up”) part of the song suggests the nature of the dance, in which the footwork, called “zapateado“, is done faster and faster as the music tempo accelerates. A repeated lyric is “Yo no soy marinero, soy capitán”, meaning “I am not a sailor, I am a captain”; Veracruz is a maritime locale.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
1 Comment

Posted by on June 19, 2017 in latin music, r&b

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: