RSS

Category Archives: r&b

“BETTYE SWANN – MAKE ME YOURS WITH LYRICS”

image

“Make Me Yours” is a 1967 song written by Bettye Swann (Betty Jean Champion) and produced by Arthur Wright,[1] which became a crossover hit for the Louisiana-born Swann. The single went to number one on the Billboard “Hot R&B” chart for two weeks in July 1967 and also peaked at number twenty-one on the pop singles chart.[2]

Betty Barton (born Betty Jean Champion; October 24, 1944), better known by the stage name Bettye Swann, is a retired American singer. She is best known for her 1967 hit song “Make Me Yours”.

She was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, one of 14 children. She grew up in Arcadia, Louisiana, and moved to Los Angeles, California in 1963. Although some sources state that she was in a vocal group known as The Fawns who recorded for Money Records in 1964, she has refuted this, saying that she sang with a trio in Arcadia by that name.[1]

In 1964, she started a solo singing career, changing her name to Bettye Swann at the prompting of local DJ Al Scott, who became her manager. After a minor hit with the self-penned “Don’t Wait Too Long”, her big breakthrough came with “Make Me Yours”, which topped the Billboard R&B charts in July 1967 and made #21 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] In 1968, she split with Scott, moved to Georgia, won a new contract with Capitol Records, and had another hit in 1969 with her cover of the Jeannie Seely hit “Don’t Touch Me” (#14 R&B, #38 Hot 100).

In 1972, she transferred to Atlantic Records and had a couple of minor hits with “Victim of a Foolish Heart” (later covered by Joss Stone) and Merle Haggard’s “Today I Started Loving You Again”. After leaving Money records she lived for a short time in Athens, Georgia.[1] She continued to record until the mid-1970s, but with little commercial success.
en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
1 Comment

Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-16T11:20:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 16 Nov 2018 11:20:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, female vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

Tags:

“Redbone – Come and Get Your Love “

“Redbone – Come and Get Your Love “

“Come and Get Your Love”is a 1974 hit single by the Native American rock band Redbone. The song was written by band member Lolly Vegas and produced by Lolly and his brother Pat Vegas, who was also a band member. It was originally featured on Redbone’s album, Wovoka; later the song appeared on many “greatest hits” albums released by the band, as well as on numerous compilation albums of the 1970s.
The song peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in April 1974. It spent 18 weeks in the Top 40 and landed as the 4th most popular song on the Hot 100 for 1974. The single was certified gold by the RIAA on April 22, 1974, which indicates that it had sold over half a million copies in the United States. The song is Redbone’s highest charting single and one of two Top 40 hits by the band (an earlier recording, “The Witch Queen of New Orleans”, peaked at number 21 in 1972).

“Come and Get Your Love” also exists in a longer version, with an introductory slow part, plus a longer repeated coda. However, most radio vstations rarely play it on the air.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
11 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-12T09:16:11+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 12 Nov 2018 09:16:11 +0000 31, in male vocal group, r&b

 

Tags:

 “Spirit in the Sky” Norman Greenbaum

 “Spirit in the Sky” Norman Greenbaum

Norman Joel Greenbaum (born November 20, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter. He is best known for writing and performing the 1969 song “Spirit in the Sky“.
Greenbaum was born in Malden, Massachusetts. He was raised in an Orthodox Jewish household and attended Hebrew school at Congregation Beth Israel.[1] His initial interest in music was sparked by southern blues music and the folk music that was popular in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He performed with various bands in high school and studied musicat Boston University for two years. In college he performed at local coffeehouses but eventually dropped out and moved to Los Angeles in 1965.

Greenbaum is best known for his song “Spirit in the Sky“. The song, with its combination of ‘heavy’ guitar, hand-clapping, and spiritual lyrics, was released by Warner Bros. Records in 1969. It sold two million copies in 1969 and 1970,[3] and received a gold discfrom the R.I.A.A. It has subsequently been used in many films, advertisements, and television shows.[3]

Although “Spirit in the Sky” has a clear Christian theme, Greenbaum was and remains an observant Jew.[4][5]Greenbaum says he was inspired to write the song after watching country singers singing a song on television. In an interview Greenbaum stated that western movies were the real inspiration for “Spirit in the Sky”:[6]

Norman Greenbaum: If you ask me what I based “Spirit In The Sky” on … what did we grow up watching? Westerns! These mean and nasty varmints get shot and they wanted to die with their boots on. So to me that was spiritual, they wanted to die with their boots on.

Ray Shasho: So that was the trigger that got you to write the song?

Norman Greenbaum: Yes. The song itself was simple, when you’re writing a song you keep it simple of course. It wasn’t like a Christian song of praise it was just a simple song. I had to use Christianity because I had to use something. But more important it wasn’t the Jesus part, it was the spirit in the sky. Funny enough … I wanted to die with my boots on.

Though Greenbaum is generally regarded as a one-hit wonder,[4][5]several of his records placed prominently in the charts, including “Canned Ham” in 1970, which reached number 46 on the Billboard pop chart. In 1966,[7] under the name Dr. West’s Medicine Show and Junk Band, he recorded the novelty hit “The Eggplant That Ate Chicago“.[7] In the 1960s Greenbaum also performed under the name Bruno Wolf with the Jim Kweskin Jug Band.[

Wikipedia.org

 
12 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-12T08:00:11+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 12 Nov 2018 08:00:11 +0000 31, in 1960s, music, other, r&b

 

Tags:

“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

In 1962, while playing a gig at the Pypo Club in Seaside, Oregon, then managed by Al Dardis, the band noticed Rockin’ Robin Roberts’s version of

“Louie Louie”

being played on the jukebox for hours on end. The entire club would get up and dance.Ely convinced the Kingsmen to learn the song, which they played at dances to a great crowd response. Unknown to him, he changed the beat because he misheard it on a jukebox. Ken Chase, host of radio station KISN, formed his own club to capitalize on these dance crazes. Dubbed the “Chase”, the Kingsmen became the club’s house band and Ken Chase became the band’s manager. On April 5, 1963, Chase booked the band an hour-long session at the local Northwestern Inc. studio for the following day. The band had just played a 90-minute

“Louie Louie”

marathon.

Despite the band’s annoyance at having so little time to prepare, on April 6 at 10 am the Kingsmen walked into the three-microphone recording studio. In order to sound like a live performance, Ely was forced to lean back and sing to a microphone suspended from the ceiling. “It was more yelling than singing,” Ely said, “’cause I was trying to be heard over all the instruments.” In addition, he was wearing braces at the time of the performance, further compounding his infamously slurred words. Ely sang the beginning of the third verse several bars too early, but realized his mistake and waited for the rest of the band to catch up. In what was thought to be a warm-up, the song was recorded in its first and only take. The Kingsmen were not proud of the version, but their manager liked the rawness of their cover. The B-side was “Haunted Castle”, composed by Ely and Don Gallucci, the new keyboardist. However, Lynn Easton was credited on both the Jerden and Wand releases. The entire session cost $50, and the band split the cost.

“Louie Louie” was kept from the top spot on the charts in late 1963 and early 1964 by the Singing Nun and Bobby Vinton, who monopolized the No.1 slot for four weeks apiece. The Kingsmen single reached No. 1 on the Cashbox chart and No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Additionally in the UK it reached No. 26 on the Record Retailer chart. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

The band attracted nationwide attention when “Louie Louie” was banned by the governor of Indiana, Matthew E. Welsh, also attracting the attention of the FBI because of alleged indecent lyrics in their version of the song. The lyrics were, in fact, innocent, but Ely’s baffling enunciation permitted teenage fans and concerned parents alike to imagine the most scandalous obscenities. All of this attention only made the song more popular. In April 1966 “Louie Louie” was reissued and once again hit the music charts, reaching No. 65 on the Cashbox chart and No. 97 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
7 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-11T09:32:51+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 11 Nov 2018 09:32:51 +0000 31, in American music artists, classic music, entertainment, male vocal group, r&b

 

Tags: ,

“Mary Jane Girls-Candyman”


The Mary Jane Girls were known as an American R&B, soul and funk group in the 1980s. They were protégées of singer Rick James. They are known for their hit songs “In My House“, “All Night Long“, “Candy Man”, and their cover version of “Walk Like a Man“.

Joanne “Jojo” McDuffie was the lead singer, the others filling out the group’s style and appearance. On the studio recordings, McDuffie was backed by session vocalists rather than the other Mary Jane Girls. The Mary Jane Girls released two albums in the 1980s and recorded a third which was never released.

In 1983, James proposed to Motown that McDuffie be offered a solo career but miscommunication caused the label to sign an all-girl group, which he determined would be the Mary Jane Girls.

James filled the positions behind McDuffie with Wells, Ghant and Wuletich. He also wrote all the original songs and produced all the recordings.

source

 
10 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-11T09:15:12+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 11 Nov 2018 09:15:12 +0000 31, in r&b

 

Tags: ,

“I’ll Never Hear the Bells” – The Dells

“I’ll Never Hear the Bells” – The Dells

image

The Dells were an American R&B vocal group. Formed in high school in 1952 by founding members Marvin Junior, Verne Allison, Johnny Funches, Chuck Barksdale, and Mickey and Lucius McGill, under the name the El-Rays, they released their first recording in 1954, and two years later, had their first R&B hit with “Oh What a Night“. After disbanding due to a near-fatal car crash in 1958, the band reformed in 1960 with Funches being replaced by Johnny Carter. This lineup remained together until Carter’s 2009 death. The Dells were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fameand the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. The vocal group performed until illness forced longtime lead singer Marvin Junior and bass vocalist Chuck Barksdale into retirement, ending the group’s 60-year run.

Successful years

In 1966, the Dells returned to Chess under the label’s Cadet subsidiary working with Bobby Miller and future Earth, Wind & Fire arranger Charles Stepney. In 1967, the Dells issued the album There Is which included their first R&B chart-topper in years with the title track, which showcased the sharp baritone of Marvin Junior and the harmonies with the four other Dells. The song was also their first top 20 pop hit.

Subsequent R&B hits included “Wear It on Our Face,” “Always Together” (Top 20 Pop, “I Can Sing a Rainbow Love is Blue (medley)” (UK#15),[4] and their first #1 R&B hit and first Top Ten pop hit, 1968’s “Stay in My Corner,” which reached #10 on the pop chart and showcased both Carter and Marvin in lead vocals. The Dells’ soulful version of their debut hit, “Oh What a Night” gave the group their second chart-topping R&B single and also reached the top ten on the Billboard Hot 100. For a second time, the song sold over a million copies Subsequent hits included “Open Up My Heart,” “Oh What A Day,” and “On the Dock of the Bay.” In 1971, the Dells’ “The Love We Had Stays on My Mind” became another Top Ten hit on the R&B charts, also reaching the pop Top 30. By this time Charles Stepney had taken over production duties from Bobby Miller. 1973’s “Give Your Baby a Standing Ovation” was their third certified gold record. The song was written by L.V. Johnso and produced by Don Davis.

Later years

Leaving Cadet around the end of 1974 with the parent company in financial difficulties, the group would continue recording in order under the Mercury, ABC, and Virgin labels finding some hits, including 1980’s “I Touched a Dream”, which returned the group to the top 40 on the R&B charts. The Dells were confined mostly to the oldies market afterwards until they were asked to be creative consultants to Robert Townsend‘s acclaimed 1991 musical, The Five Heartbeats, which was loosely based on the lives of the Dells. The group recorded a composition titled “A Heart Is a House for Love“. The song reached number 13 on the Billboard R&B chart, making them only one of two groups to have hit singles in five decades. The following year, signing with PIR, they released the album, I Salute You. The Dells continued performing and recording sporadically in the early years of the new millennium. In 2004, the group were inducted to both the Vocal Group Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The group continued performing until 2012.

Deaths

Original Dells vocalist Johnny Funches died of pneumonia on January 23, 1998, at the age of 62.

Johnny Carter died of cancer on August 21, 2009, at the age of 75. Carter is one of the few artists to be a double Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, having been inducted with The Flamingos in 2001, and the Dells in 2004.

On May 29, 2013, founding member Marvin Junior died in his sleep at his home in Harvey, Illinois, succumbing to complications of kidney failure and a weak heart at the age of 77.

Wikipedia.org

 
5 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-11T09:09:47+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 11 Nov 2018 09:09:47 +0000 31, in r&b

 

Tags:

“The Oogum Boogum Song (Lyric Video) by Brenton Wood from Oogum Boogum”

image

Brenton Wood (born Alfred Jesse Smith, July 26, 1941, Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American singer and songwriter known for his two 1967 hit singles, “The Oogum Boogum Song” and “Gimme Little Sign”.

Career

The family moved to San Pedro in Los Angeles, California when Wood was a child. He attended San Pedro High School for part of his freshman year before moving to Compton, where Brenton became a member of the Compton High School track team and received several awards for his athletic achievements.

Following his high school graduation, Wood enrolled in East Los Angeles College. Soon after, he took the stage name Brenton Wood, possibly inspired by the wealthy Los Angeles enclave of Brentwood (some sources state that the name is in honor of his “home county”), with a second possible connection of Bretton Woods. During this period, his musical interests began to manifest themselves. He was inspired by Jesse Belvin and Sam Cooke, and he began cultivating his songwriting skills, also becoming a competent pianist.[1]

Early singles for Brent Records and Wand Records failed to chart. Wood signed with Double Shot Records, and his “The Oogum Boogum Song” reached #19 on the US Billboard R&B chart and #34 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the spring of 1967. In Southern California, “The Oogum Boogum Song” hit the top 10 on KGB-FM and #1 on KHJ. Wood’s biggest hit came a few months later, as “Gimme Little Sign” hit #9 on the pop chart, #19 on the R&B charts, #2 on KHJ, and #8 in the UK Singles Chart; sold over one million copies; and was awarded a gold disc. The title is not actually sung in the song; the chorus instead repeats “Give Me Some Kind of Sign.” Wood’s “Baby You Got It” peaked at #34 on the Hot 100 during the last week of 1967 and #3 on KHJ on 31 January 1968.

Wood recorded a duet with Shirley Goodman. His next song to reach the charts was “Come Softly to Me” in 1977.

He returned again in 1986 with the album Out of the Woodwork, which included contemporary rerecordings of his early hits, along with several new tracks, including the single, “Soothe Me.”

His album This Love Is for Real came out in 2001. Among his later appearances was in 2006 on the Los Angeles public access program Thee Mr. Duran Show, where Wood and his band performed several of his hit singles.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-10T10:10:43+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 10 Nov 2018 10:10:43 +0000 31, in American music artists, blues, entertainment, male vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

Tags: ,

 
%d bloggers like this: