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Category Archives: r&b

“The Spinners – Love Don’t Love Nobody (It Takes A Fool)”

“The Spinners – Love Don’t Love Nobody (It Takes A Fool)”

The Spinners are an American rhythm and blues vocal group that formed in 1954 and are still active. They enjoyed a string of hit singles and albums during the 1960s and 1970s. Formed in Detroit, Michigan, the group still tours regularly as of 2015, although Henry Fambrough is the only remaining original member.

The group is also listed as the Detroit Spinners and the Motown Spinners (for their 1960s recordings with the Detroit label). These other names were used in the UK to avoid confusion with a British folk group also called the Spinners. In 2015, they were nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Philippé Wynne was an American singer. Best known for his role as the lead singer of The Spinners. Wynne scored notable hits such as “How Could I Let You Get Away”, “The Rubberband Man”, and “One of a Kind”.Wikipedia

Died: July 14, 1984, Oakland, CA

Albums: Wynne Jammin’Happiness Is Being with the SpinnersSpinnersRhino Hi-Five: The Spinners

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-22T09:21:53+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 22 Sep 2018 09:21:53 +0000 31, in black music artists, male vocal group, r&b

 

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“Stacy Lattisaw – Let me be your angel”

Stacy Lattisaw (born November 25, 1966) is an American R&B, Dance and gospel singer. From her debut in 1979 until 1990, she sang mostly R&B and Pop music. Since the 1990s, she has exclusively sung gospel music.

Career

When she was a teenager in the early 1980s, Lattisaw had a string of Top 40 R&B hits, with several songs— “Let Me Be Your Angel”, “Jump to the Beat”, “Love on a Two-Way Street”, and “Miracles”—crossing over to the pop mainstream. Lattisaw recorded her first album for Cotillion Records at the age of 12 in 1979, under the direction of record producer Van McCoy. However it was not until she affiliated with Narada Michael Walden, a former drummer with the Mahavishnu Orchestra who was just beginning a career as a producer, that she found success. Under Walden’s direction, she had five hit albums between 1981 and 1986. She also opened for the Jacksons Triumph Tour in 1981. From Lattisaw’s 1982 album Sneakin’ Out, Mariah Carey used a sample of the song “Attack of the Name Game” (R&B #14) for her 1999 #1 hit “Heartbreaker.”

Lattisaw continued recording into the late 1980s, signing with Motown in 1986. She scored her only #1 R&B hit with frequent duet partner Johnny Gill, titled “Where Do We Go from Here”, in 1989. While the success was great, she grew increasingly disenchanted with the record industry. By the early 1990s, she decided to retire from the music industry and concentrate on raising her family. Her official website stated that she was to work on a gospel CD. In 2010, Lattisaw’s music career was chronicled on the TV One docu-series Unsung, in which she also appeared.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T10:10:09+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 10:10:09 +0000 31, in black music artists, female vocalist, r&b

 

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“IT’S GONNA TAKE A MIRACLE – Deniece Williams”

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Deniece Williams (born June Deniece Chandler; June 3, 1950) is an American singer, songwriter and record producer who achieved success in the 1970s and 1980s. Williams is known for hits such as “Free” (1976), “Silly” (1981), “It’s Gonna Take a Miracle” (1982), “Let’s Hear It for the Boy” (1984), and for her duets with Johnny Mathis.

Career

Born in Gary, Indiana, Williams attended Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, in the hopes of becoming a registered nurse and an anesthetist, but dropped out after a year and a half. “You have to be a good student to be in college, and I wasn’t.”[1] She also performed on the side during that time. (“I got a part-time job singing at a club, Casino Royal, and I liked it. It was a lot of fun.”) During those years Williams worked also in a telephone company and as a ward clerk in the Chicago Mercy Hospital.[1] As Deniece Chandler, she recorded for The Toddlin’ Town group of labels and one of those early records, “I’m Walking Away”, released on Toddlin’ Town’s Lock Records subsidiary in the late 1960s, is a favorite on England’s Northern Soul scene. In the 1970s she became a backup vocalist for Stevie Wonder as part of “Wonderlove”.

She left Wonder in 1975 and after signing to Columbia Records, she teamed up with two famed producers: Maurice White of Earth, Wind & Fire, and his frequent collaborator, Charles Stepney. Her 1976 debut album entitled This Is Niecy was released. The single “Free” reached No. 2 on the Black Singles chart, No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100, and No. 1 on the British Singles chart. The album also featured “Cause You Love Me Baby” (which charted separately on the R&B chart as the flip side of “Free”) and “That’s What Friends Are For”. She also shared a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with pop singer Johnny Mathis in 1978 with the duet “Too Much, Too Little, Too Late”. The duet also topped the Black Singles and Adult Contemporary charts. Williams also topped the dance charts with her disco single “I’ve Got the Next Dance”. Mathis and Williams also recorded the popular theme to the 1980s sitcom Family Ties, “Without Us”. Williams moved on to the American Recording Company (ARC) in the early 1980s where she scored the top ten R&B smash hit “Silly” in 1981. The following year, yet another famed producer, Thom Bell, helped Williams score another number-one R&B chart-topper with her remake of The Royalettes’ “It’s Gonna Take a Miracle”, which became a Top 10 pop hit as well, reaching No. 10.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T08:14:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 08:14:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, ballad, black music artists, classic music, coffee, entertainment, female vocalist, music, r&b

 

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“Sam and Dave – Hold on I’m coming”

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Sam & Dave were an American soul and R&B duo who performed together from 1961 through to 1981. The tenor (higher) voice was Samuel David Moore (born Samuel David Hicks on October 12, 1935), and the baritone/tenor (lower) voice was Dave Prater (May 9, 1937 – April 9, 1988).

Sam & Dave are members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Grammy Hall of Fame, the Vocal Group Hall of Fame, and are Grammy Award and multiple gold record award winning artists. According to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Sam & Dave were the most successful soul duo, and brought the sounds of the black gospel church to pop music with their call-and-response records. Recorded primarily at Stax Records in Memphis, Tennessee, from 1965 through 1968, these included “Soul Man”, “Hold On, I’m Comin'”, “You Don’t Know Like I Know”, “I Thank You”, “When Something is Wrong with My Baby”, “Wrap It Up”, and many other Southern Soul classics. Except for Aretha Franklin, no soul act during Sam & Dave’s Stax years (1965–1968) had more consistent R&B chart success, including 10 consecutive top 20 singles and 3 consecutive top 10 LPs.[1] Their crossover charts appeal (13 straight appearances and 2 top 10 singles) helped to pave the way for the acceptance of soul music by white pop audiences, and their song “Soul Man” was one of the first songs by a black group to top the pop charts using the word “soul”, helping define the genre. “Soul Man” was a number one Pop Hit (Cashbox: November 11, 1967) and has been recognized as one of the most influential songs of the past 50 years by the Grammy Hall of Fame, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Rolling Stone magazine, and RIAA Songs of the Century. “Soul Man” was featured as the soundtrack and title for a 1986 film and also a 1997–1998 television series, and Soul Men was a 2008 feature film.

Nicknamed “Double Dynamite”, “The Sultans of Sweat”, and “The Dynamic Duo” for their gritty, gospel-infused performances, Sam & Dave were one of the greatest live acts of the 1960s. They were an influence on many future musicians, including Bruce Springsteen, Al Green, Tom Petty, Phil Collins, Michael Jackson, Elvis Costello, The Jam, Teddy Pendergrass, Billy Joel and Steve Winwood. The Blues Brothers, who helped create a resurgence of popularity for soul, R&B, and blues in the 1980s, were influenced by Sam & Dave – their biggest hit was a cover of “Soul Man”, and their act and stage show had many similarities to the duo.

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“BOB SEGER – OLDTIME ROCK AND ROLL”

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“Old Time Rock and Roll” is a song written by George Jackson and recorded by Bob Seger on his 1978 album Stranger in Town. It was also released as a single in 1979. It is a sentimentalized look back at the music of the original rock ‘n’ roll era. The song gained a huge amount of popularity after being featured in the 1983 film Risky Business. It has since become a standard in popular music and was ranked number two on the Amusement & Music Operators Association’s survey of the Top 40 Jukebox Singles of All Time in 1996.[1] It was also listed as one of the Songs of the Century in 2001 and ranked #100 in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs poll in 2004 of the top songs in American cinema. The song was recorded at the Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Sheffield, Alabama and Sound Suite Studios[2] in Detroit, Michigan.

History

The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, who often backed Seger in his studio recordings, sent Seger a demo of the song during the recording of Stranger in Town.[3] He said in 2006 (and also on the “Stranger in Town” episode of the US radio show In the Studio with Redbeard a few years earlier):

All I kept from the original was: “Old time rock and roll, that kind of music just soothes the soul, I reminisce about the days of old with that old time rock and roll”. I rewrote the verses and I never took credit. That was the dumbest thing I ever did. And Tom Jones (Thomas E. Jones) and George Jackson know it, too. But I just wanted to finish the record [Stranger in Town]. I rewrote every verse you hear except for the choruses. I didn’t ask for credit. My manager said: “You should ask for a third of the credit.” And I said: “Nah. Nobody’s gonna like it.” I’m not credited on it so I couldn’t control the copyright either. Meanwhile it got into a Hardee’s commercial because I couldn’t control it. Oh my God, it was awful!”[4]

However, George Stephenson of Malaco Records claimed:

“Old Time Rock and Roll” is truly [George] Jackson’s song, and he has the tapes to prove it, despite Seger’s claims that he altered it. Bob had pretty much finished his recording at Muscle Shoals and he asked them if they had any other songs he could listen to for the future..”[5]

Originally, the Silver Bullet Band was displeased with its inclusion on Stranger in Town, claiming, according to Seger, that the song was not “Silver Bullety”. However, upon hearing audience reactions to it during their tour in Europe, the band grew to like the song.[6]

In 1990, Seger joined Billy Joel on one occasion and Don Henley on another to play the song during their concerts in Auburn Hills, Michigan.[7] He also performed the song at his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

In popular culture

The song was featured in the 1983 film Risky Business, starring Tom Cruise. Cruise’s character, Joel Goodson, famously lip-syncs and dances in his underwear as this song plays after his parents leave him home alone. The sequence was simulated in the teaser trailer for Garfield: The Movie, the 1984 Alvin and the Chipmunks episode “The Victrola Awards” as performed by Alvin and the Chipmunks, and commercials for Guitar Hero on Tour: Decades, Guitar Hero World Tour, Guitar Hero: Metallica, and more recently Guitar Hero 5 and Band Hero. Activision created a series of television advertisements directed by Brett Ratner based on the scene, each featuring a different set of celebrities lip-sync to the lyrics while using the new instrument controllers. The first ad included athletes Kobe Bryant, Tony Hawk, Alex Rodriguez, and Michael Phelps.[8] Another ad spot featured model Heidi Klum; two versions of Klum’s ad exist, one a “director’s cut” where she is wearing less clothing.[9] A subsequent commercial featuring model Marisa Miller was banned from airing as too racy.[10] Two separate ads featured David Cook, the winner of the seventh season of American Idol, along with fellow finalist David Archuleta.[11]

The song was featured in the TV series ALF, The Nanny, Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, Growing Pains, Scrubs and South Park. Most recently, the song was sung on the episode “Girls (And Boys) On Film” from American TV series Glee, in a mash-up with Kenny Loggins’ song “Danger Zone” from the 1986 film Top Gun, also starring Cruise and The Goldbergs, where Barry Goldberg tries to do the Risky Business dance move that Tom Cruise did in his button up shirt without pants.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-17T10:25:42+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 17 Sep 2018 10:25:42 +0000 31, in entertainment, male vocalist, music, r&b

 

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“Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom (Central Park 1980)”

“Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom (Central Park 1980)”

“Philadelphia Freedom” is a song released by The Elton John Band as a single in 1975. The song was one of Elton John’s seven #1 US hits during the early and mid-1970s, which saw his recordings dominating the charts. In Canada, it was his eighth single to hit the top of the RPM national singles chart.

The song was written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin as a favour to John’s friend, tennis star Billie Jean King. King was part of the Philadelphia Freedoms professional tennis team. The song features an orchestral arrangement by Gene Page, including flutes, horns, and strings.

The song made its album debut on 1977’s Elton John’s Greatest Hits Volume II. The Unedited version (without an early fade out) appears only on the box set To Be Continued…. and the remaster for Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-17T09:42:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 17 Sep 2018 09:42:00 +0000 31, in classic music, entertainment, music, r&b, reflections, rocknroll

 

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“Arthur Conley-Sweet Soul Music”

“Arthur Conley-Sweet Soul Music”

In 1964, he moved to a new label (Baltimore’s Ru-Jac Records) and released “I’m a Lonely Stranger”. When Otis Redding heard this, he asked Conley to record a new version, which was released on Redding’s own fledgling label Jotis Records, as only its second release.[2] Conley met Redding in 1967. Together they rewrote the Sam Cooke song “Yeah Man” into “Sweet Soul Music”, which, at Redding’s insistence, was released on the Atco-distributed label Fame Records, and was recorded at FAME studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. It proved to be a massive hit, going to the number two position on the U.S. charts and the Top Ten across much of Europe. “Sweet Soul Music” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[3]

After several years of hits singles in the early 1970s, he relocated to England in 1975, and spent several years in Belgium, settling in Amsterdam (Netherlands) in spring 1977. At the beginning of 1980 he had some major performances as Lee Roberts and the Sweaters in the Ganzenhoef, Paradiso, De Melkweg and the Concertgebouw, and was highly successful. At the end of 1980 he moved to the Dutch town of Ruurlo legally changing his name to Lee Roberts—his middle name and his mother’s maiden name. He promoted new music via his Art-Con Productions company. Amongst the bands he promoted was the heavy metal band Shockwave from The Hague. A live performance on January 8, 1980, featuring Lee Roberts & the Sweaters, was released as an album entitled Soulin’ in 1988.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-17T09:13:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 17 Sep 2018 09:13:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, black music artists, classic music, male vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

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