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Category Archives: pop music/motown

“Shake Me, Wake Me” The Four Tops

“Shake Me, Wake Me” The Four Tops

Shake Me, Wake Me (When It’s Over)” is a 1966 song written and produced by Holland–Dozier–Holland and released as a single by the Four Tops on the Motown label. The song peaked at number eighteen on the US Pop Singles chart. It peaked at number five on the R&B singles chart.

Barbra Streisand recorded her version in her 1975’s album Lazy Afternoon, it was the second single of the album and peaked #14 on Dance Music/Club Play Singles and #10 on Disco Singles charts.

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SUPERSTITION – Stevie Wonder

SUPERSTITION – Stevie Wonder

Superstition” is a popular song composed, produced, arranged, and performed by Stevie Wonder for Motown Records in 1972. It was the lead single for Wonder’s album Talking Book[1], and released in many countries. It reached number one in the U.S.[2] and number one on the soul singles chart.[3] The song was Wonder’s first number-one single since “Signed, Sealed, Delivered, I’m Yours” and topped the Billboard Hot 100 in 1973.[4] Overseas, it peaked at number eleven in the UK during February 1973. In November 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song at No. 74 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song’s lyrics are chiefly concerned with superstitions[2], mentioning several popular superstitious fables throughout the song, and deal with the negative effects superstitious beliefs can bring.

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Posted by on June 19, 2017 in pop music/motown

 

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Smokey Robinson “Tracks Of My Tears” 

Smokey Robinson “Tracks Of My Tears” 






William “Smokey” Robinson, Jr. (born February 19, 1940) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and former record executive. Robinson was the founder and front man of the Motown vocal group the Miracles, for which he also served as the group’s chief songwriter and producer. The Tracks of My Tears” is a song written by Smokey RobinsonPete Moore, and Marv Tarplin. It is a multiple award-winning 1965 hit R&B song originally recorded by their group, The Miracles, on Motown‘s Tamla label. In 1967, Johnny Rivers covered the song and his version was a number 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. Linda Ronstadt recorded a hit cover of her own in 1975 that reached number 25 on the Hot 100 chart. Numerous other artists have recorded the song over the years.

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“The Happening (Stereo)” 

“The Happening (Stereo)” 

The Happening” is a 1967 song recorded by Motown artists The Supremes. The song served as the theme song of the 1967 Columbia Pictures film The Happening, and was released as a single by Motown at the time of the film’s release that spring. While the movie flopped, the song peaked at number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in May,[1]becoming The Supremes’ tenth number-one single in the United States,[2]peaking in the top 10 on the UK Pop Chart at number six, and in the top 5 in the Australian Pop Chart and in the Dutch Pop Chart.


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Posted by on June 9, 2017 in pop music/motown

 

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“Smokey Robinson & The Miracles – You Really Got A Hold On Me” 

“Smokey Robinson & The Miracles – You Really Got A Hold On Me” 


William “Smokey” Robinson, Jr. (born February 19, 1940) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and former record executive. Robinson was the founder and front man of the Motown vocal group the Miracles, for which he also served as the group’s chief songwriter and producer. 

You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me” is a song written by Smokey Robinson which became a 1962 Top 10 hit single for The Miracles on Motown‘s Tamla label. One of the Miracles’ most covered tunes, this million-selling song received a 1998 Grammy Hall of Fame Award. It has also been selected as one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. It was covered by English rock group the Beatles on their second album, With the Beatles and many other musicians.

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Posted by on June 9, 2017 in pop music/motown

 

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“That’s The Way Love Is” 

“That’s The Way Love Is” 

“That’s the Way Love Is” is a 1967 Tamla (Motown) single recorded by The Isley Brothers and produced by Norman Whitfield, later covered in a 1969 hit version by Marvin Gaye.

The single was his third consecutive million-selling solo hit after “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” and “Too Busy Thinking About My Baby” written by Whitfield and Barrett Strong. Whitfield took the up-tempo Isley Brothers record, and turned it into a slowed-down psychedelic soul opus. Like “Grapevine”, the song is sung by an emotionally wrought Gaye, singing the song in a preacher-like tone, who tells a woman to “forget” her lover now that that lover has gone off to someone else.

The song peaked at #7 on the Billboard pop singles chart and held the #2 spot for five weeks on the soul singles chart in October 1969, eventually selling a million copies. The Temptations also covered the song as a B-side of “Psychedelic Shack” and released on their 1969 album Puzzle People.

The song was covered for the 1991 Alan Parker film The Commitments.

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 “Diana Ross – Reach Out And Touch (Somebody’s Hand)” 

 “Diana Ross – Reach Out And Touch (Somebody’s Hand)” 

Reach Out and Touch (Somebody’s Hand)” was the debut solo single of Motown singer Diana Ross, released in April 1970.

Ross, having just left The Supremes after a decade of serving as that group’s lead singer, went through a difficult situation trying to piece a solo album together. With Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson writing and producing for her, and Paul Riser arranging,[1] Ross recorded “Reach Out and Touch”, which carried a heavy gospel influence, and was one of the few songs the singer recorded to express her social conscience, previously experimented with Supremes singles such as “Love Child” and “I’m Livin’ in Shame.”[2]

“Reach Out and Touch” peaked at #20 on the Billboard Hot 100,[3] #10 on the Cash Box Top 100,[4] and #7 on the R&B charts with 500,000 copies sold. It was also a hit in Great Britain, making #33 on the UK Singles Chart in August 1970. While the song’s initial success fell short of expectations, “Reach Out and Touch” became one of Ross’ most popular and notable songs. During her concert performances of the song, Ross often had the whole crowd turn to their neighbors, and “reach out and touch” their hands.

On Saturday, July 28, 1984 Vicki McClure sang “Reach Out and Touch” before an estimated TV audience of 2.5 billion people during the Opening Ceremonies of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games held in Los AngelesCA.

Ashford and Simpson would perform the song with Teddy Pendergrass in the Philadelphia portion of Live Aid in 1985. In 2005, Ross would perform the song in closing, Tsunami Aid: A Concert of Hope.

In 1970, the same year that Diana released “Reach Out and Touch” as her first solo single, ironically the song was also covered by the group that she had just left at the start of that year, The Supremes (now fronted by Jean Terrell, along with other members Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong). The Supremes’ version was a duet with fellow Motown Records artists The Four Tops on the two group’s joint album “The Magnificent Seven,” released by Motown toward the end of 1970. In one of her autobiographies, Mary Wilson mentioned that some fans at the post-Ross Supremes’ concerts used to call out requesting that The Supremes would sing this record live, as some fans erroneously recalled that it had been The Supremes’ version, and not Ross’s, that had charted as a hit Billboard single in early ’70.

She also performed this song as the finale for the Nobel Peace Prize Concert held in OsloNorway, in 2008.

 

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