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Category Archives: pop music/motown

“My Baby Loves Me” Martha & the Vandellas 

My Baby Loves Me” is a 1966 soulstandard by Martha Reeves but released under Martha and The Vandellas. None of the Vandellas are featured in this song. Instead, the background is sung by Motown’s session group, The Andantes, and another legendary Motown group, The Four Tops. Co-written (with Sylvia Moy) and co-produced by William “Mickey” StevensonIvy Jo Hunter, the song rose to #22 on Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and #3 on Billboard’s Hot R&B singles chart.[1][2]

The song has the narrator sing of her lover and how much he loves and needs her. Reeves often refers to it as her favorite of all of her recordings. While it didn’t appear on her group’s regular studio albums, it would be put on their Greatest Hits album.[3]

Cover versions

Fellow Chicago-based, ’60s-era girl group The Lovelites covered the song in the late 1960s. In 1973, Barry Manilowrecorded a version on Barry Manilow II. Los Angeles-based singer Leda Grace did a sound-alike version, produced by Randy Jackson. San Francisco-based gospel group The Stovall Sisters did a gospel version, and Aretha Franklin has performed it in concert.

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“Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell – Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing” 


Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing” is a 1968 single released by AmericanR&B/soul duo Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell, on the Tamla label in 1968. The B-side of the single is “Little Ole Boy, Little Ole Girl” from the duo’s United LP. The first release off the duo’s second album: You’re All I Need, the song – written and produced by regular Gaye/Terrell collaborators Ashford & Simpson – became a hit within weeks of release eventually peaking at number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart,[1] the first of the duo’s s two number 1 R&B hits. In the UK “Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing” reached number 34.

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Posted by on July 24, 2017 in pop music/motown, r&b

 

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“THE TEMPTATIONS – Beauty Is Only Skin Deep”

“THE TEMPTATIONS – Beauty Is Only Skin Deep”


Over the course of their career, the Temptations have released four Billboard Hot 100 number-one singles and fourteen R&B number-one singles, and their material has earned them three Grammy Awards. The Temptations were the first Motown recording act to win a Grammy Award – for “Cloud Nine” in 1969[5] – and in 2013 received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Six of the Temptations (Edwards, Franklin, Kendricks, Ruffin, Otis Williams and Paul Williams) were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989. Three classic Temptations songs, “My Girl”, “Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)”, and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”, are among The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The Temptations were also ranked at number 68 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Artists of all time.

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“The Happening (Stereo)” 

“The Happening (Stereo)” 

The Happening” is a 1967 song recorded by Motown artists The Supremes. The song served as the theme song of the 1967 Columbia Pictures film The Happening, and was released as a single by Motown at the time of the film’s release that spring. While the movie flopped, the song peaked at number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in May,[1]becoming The Supremes’ tenth number-one single in the United States,[2]peaking in the top 10 on the UK Pop Chart at number six, and in the top 5 in the Australian Pop Chart and in the Dutch Pop Chart.


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Posted by on July 14, 2017 in pop music/motown

 

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 “Martha and the Vandellas “Jimmy Mack!” 

 “Martha and the Vandellas “Jimmy Mack!” 




Jimmy Mack” is a pop/soul song that in 1967 became a hit single by Martha and the Vandellas for Motown‘s Gordy imprint. Written and produced by Motown’s main creative team, Holland–Dozier–Holland, “Jimmy Mack” was the final Top 10 hit for the Vandellas in the United States, peaking at number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967 and at number-one on the Billboard R&B Singles chart.[1]

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 “The Supremes – Back In My Arms Again” 

 “The Supremes – Back In My Arms Again” 

Written and produced by Motown’s main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, “Back in My Arms Again” was the fifth consecutive and overall number-one song for the group on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in the United States from June 6, 1965 through June 12, 1965,[1] also topping the soul chart for a week.

It was also the last of five Supremes songs in a row to go number one (the others are “Where Did Our Love Go,” “Baby Love,” “Come See About Me,” and “Stop! In the Name of Love“). The song’s middle eight is almost identical to later Holland-Dozier-Holland hit, The Isley Brothers This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak for You).”

The famous idea of using Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard’s names on the single may have been partially due to Motown’s marketing strategy of showcasing each individual Supreme, as opposed to other groups of the day, with the exception of The Beatles, which were known on a one-name collective basis. On the album in which this single appeared, More Hits by the Supremes, and on the cover of the official single, each member is pictured separately on the front, with her signature above it.

The Supremes performed the song on The Mike Douglas Show, a syndicated daytime program, on May 5, 1965 and again on November 3.[2] They performed the song nationally on the NBC variety program Hullabaloo! [3] on Tuesday, May 11, 1965, peaking on the music charts in the following weeks.

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“Shake Me, Wake Me” The Four Tops

“Shake Me, Wake Me” The Four Tops

Shake Me, Wake Me (When It’s Over)” is a 1966 song written and produced by Holland–Dozier–Holland and released as a single by the Four Tops on the Motown label. The song peaked at number eighteen on the US Pop Singles chart. It peaked at number five on the R&B singles chart.

Barbra Streisand recorded her version in her 1975’s album Lazy Afternoon, it was the second single of the album and peaked #14 on Dance Music/Club Play Singles and #10 on Disco Singles charts.

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