RSS

Category Archives: pop music

“Blood, Sweat & Tears – Spinning Wheel (album version)”

image

“Spinning Wheel” is the title of a popular song from 1969 by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. The song was written by the band’s Canadian lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas and appears on their self-titled album.

Released as a single in 1969, “Spinning Wheel” peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in July of that year, remaining in the runner-up position for three weeks.[1] In August of that year, the song topped the Billboard easy listening chart for two weeks.[2] It was also a crossover hit, reaching #45 on the US R&B chart.

“Spinning Wheel” was nominated for three Grammy Awards at the 1970 ceremony, winning in the category Best Instrumental Arrangement. The arranger for the song was the band’s saxophonist, Fred Lipsius. It was nominated for Record of the Year and Song of the Year; the album won the Grammy for Album of the Year.

Clayton-Thomas was quoted as describing the song as being “written in an age when psychedelic imagery was all over lyrics…it was my way of saying, ‘Don’t get too caught up, because everything comes full circle’.”[2]

The song ends with the 1815 Austrian tune “O Du Lieber Augustin” (“The More We Get Together” or “Did You Ever See a Lassie?”)[citation needed] and drummer Bobby Colomby’s comment: “That wasn’t too good”, followed by laughter from the rest of the group. According to producer James William Guercio this section was added in at the last minute after the end of the master tape was recorded over accidentally by an engineer at the studio. Most of this section and the trumpet solo were edited out for the single version. The eight-bar piano solo which precedes the trumpet solo on the album version is overlapped with guitar on the single version before the last verse.

Among artists who have covered “Spinning Wheel” are Shirley Bassey, who included the song on her 1970 album Something, and Nancy Wilson, who covered it in the Hawaii Five-O episode “Trouble in Mind,” which originally aired September 23, 1970. In 1970 Marianne Mendt released a version of the tune in Austria, as “A g’scheckert’s Hutschpferd” and Barbara Eden performed a live version [3] that aired in the U.S. Jazz organist Dr. Lonnie Smith recorded an extended instrumental version for his 1970 Blue Note album Drives.[4] James Brown scored a minor hit in 1971 with an instrumental version of the song, reaching #90 on the Billboard Hot 100.[5][6] The Canadian a cappella music group, Cadence also covered this song. In 1970 P.P. Arnold recorded a version produced by Barry Gibb but it was not released. An instrumental rendition of this song was used as a cue on the first Wheel of Fortune pilot titled Shopper’s Bazaar.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
7 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:21:04+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:21:04 +0000 31, in male vocal group, pop music

 

Tags: ,

“Tony Orlando & Dawn – Knock Three Times”

Tony Orlando and Dawn is an American pop music group that was popular in the 1970s. Their signature hits include “Candida“, “Knock Three Times“, “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree“, “Say, Has Anybody Seen My Sweet Gypsy Rose“, and “He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You).

 
6 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:00:33+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:00:33 +0000 31, in 1970s, pop music, r&b

 

Tags: ,

“True” By Spandau Ballet

“True” By Spandau Ballet

True” is a song by the English band Spandau Ballet. It was released on 14 April 1983 as the third single from their third studio album of the same name. The song was written by band member Gary Kemp.

The song was a huge worldwide hit, peaking at number one in the UK Singles Chart on 30 April 1983 for four weeks, becoming the sixth biggest selling single of the year, and charting highly in 20 other countries. It is Spandau Ballet’s biggest hit and their only major hit in the U.S., reaching number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the autumn of 1983 and topping the adult contemporary chart for one week.

In 1985, the band performed the song during Live Aid. A new mix by Tony Swain and Gary Kemp was released in 2002 on the compilation album Reformation.

On 30 April 2008, the single celebrated its 25th anniversary, and in honour, EMI released a brand new True EP on 5 May 2008, which included the original single, the new mix found on Reformation and the remastered album version, plus a live recordings of “True” and “Gold” from the last show of the group’s 1983 tour at Sadlers Wells.

A notable omission is that Spandau Ballet bassist Martin Kemp did not perform on the track, rather a bass synthesizer was used instead. However, Kemp would play in his capacity for future live performances.

Wikipedia.org

 
4 Comments

Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T10:02:43+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 10:02:43 +0000 31, in other, pop music, uk

 

Tags:

“Sheena Easton – My Baby Takes The Morning Train”

“9 to 5” (or “Morning Train”) is the title of a popular song written by British songwriter Florrie Palmer and recorded by Sheena Easton in 1980, becoming her biggest hit. It peaked at number three in the United Kingdom in August 1980 and was certified gold.[1] It was released in the United States (under the title “Morning Train (9 to 5)” to avoid confusion with Dolly Parton’s recent hit “9 to 5”) in February 1981, where it reached number one, becoming Easton’s only number one chart-topper.

source

 
2 Comments

Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-04T10:14:03+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 04 Jan 2019 10:14:03 +0000 31, in 1990s, female vocalist, pop music

 

Tags: ,

POWER OF LOVE – Jennifer Rush

The Power of Love” is a song co-written and originally recorded by Jennifer Rush in 1984. It has been covered by several artists, most notably by Celine Dion, Laura Branigan and Air Supply.

Rush’s original version, released in her native United States at the end of 1984 and in Europe during 1985, went to number one in the United Kingdom in October 1985 and became the biggest-selling single of the year in that country. It was also a number one single in several other European countries, as well as Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Dion’s version went to number one in the United States, Canada and Australia in 1994. The song has been translated into several languages, becoming a pop standard.

source

 
2 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T09:51:54+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 09:51:54 +0000 31, in ballad, pop music, reflections

 

Here Comes The Rain Again Eurythmics

Here Comes The Rain Again Eurythmics

“Here Comes the Rain Again” is a 1983 song by British duo Eurythmics. It was written by group members Annie Lennox and David A. Stewart and produced by Stewart. The song was released on 12 January 1984[1] as the third single in the UK from the album Touch and in the United States as the first single. It became Eurythmics’ second Top 10 U.S. hit, peaking at number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100. “Here Comes the Rain Again” hit number eight in the UK Singles Chart, becoming their fifth consecutive Top 10 single in that country.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-30T11:40:21+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 30 Dec 2018 11:40:21 +0000 31, in other, pop music, rock

 

Tags: ,

“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

George Alan O’Dowd (born 14 June 1961), known professionally as Boy George, is an English singer, songwriter, DJ, fashion designer and photographer. He is the lead singer of the Grammy and Brit Award-winning pop band Culture Club. At the height of the band’s fame, during the 1980s, they recorded global hit songs such as “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”, “Time (Clock of the Heart)” and “Karma Chameleon” and George was known for his soulful voice and androgynous appearance. He was part of the English New Romantic movement which emerged in the late 1970s to the early 1980s.

His music is often classified as blue-eyed soul, which is influenced by rhythm and blues and reggae. He was lead singer of Jesus Loves You during the period 1989–1992. His 1990s and 2000s-era solo music has glam influences, such as David Bowie and Iggy Pop. More recently, he has released fewer music recordings, splitting his time between songwriting, DJing, writing books, designing clothes and photography.

Boy George – Do You Really Want To Hurt Me Lyrics

Give me time
To release my crime
Let me love and steal
I have danced
Inside your eyes
How can love be real
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Precious kisses
Words that burn me
Lovers never ask you why
In my heart
The fires burning
Choose my colour
Find a star
Precious people always tell me
That’s a step
A step too far
*Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Words are few
I have spoken
I could waste a thousand years
Wrapped in sorrow
Words are token
Come inside/and catch my tears
You’ve been talking
But believe me
If it’s true
You do not know
This boy loves without a reason
I’m prepared
To let you go
If it’s love you want from me
Then take it away
Everything is not what you see
It’s over again

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/boy+george/do+you+really+want+to+hurt+me_20192555.html

“Do You Really Want to Hurt Me” is a song written and recorded by the British new wave band Culture Club. Released as a single in September 1982 from the group’s platinum-selling debut album Kissing to Be Clever, it was the band’s first UK #1 hit. In the United States, the single was released in November 1982 and also became a huge hit, reaching #2 for three weeks.

en.m.Wikipedia.com

 
7 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-30T10:45:09+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 30 Dec 2018 10:45:09 +0000 31, in male vocalist, pop music, uk

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: