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“In The Summertime – Mungo Jerry (with lyrics)”

“In The Summertime – Mungo Jerry (with lyrics)”

The song most associated with MUNGO JERRY is the global hit IN THE SUMMERTIME, it sold over six million copies worldwide in the first six months of release and that total is now estimated to be over a staggering thirty million units, and it is now officially recognised as the most played summer song of all time. Winning for itself and its writer RAY DORSET, prestigious Sony / ATV and Ivor Novello awards.
In describing the music of MUNGO JERRY as pure pop would be an insult to the varying styles of rock, blues, boogie and skiffle that has graced the stages of concerts and festivals which have seen MUNGO JERRY sharing and indeed at times topping the bill with the likes of JIMI HENDRIX, ELTON JOHN, ROD STEWART & THE FACES, GENESIS, STATUS QUO, CANNED HEAT, FREE.

Just after the single’s release, the band turned in a breathtaking performance at the Hollywood Music Festival, near Newcastle Under-Lyme with acts including BLACK SABBATH, TRAFFIC, JOSE FELICIANO and making their first UK appearance, GRATEFUL DEAD…..

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-11T10:20:40+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 11 Aug 2018 10:20:40 +0000 31, in male vocal group, pop music

 

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NEIL DIAMOND ~ SUZANNE

Suzanne is a song written by Leonard Cohen and sung by Neil Diamond.

NEIL DIAMOND’S CAREER

After his 16 weeks at Sunbeam Music were up, he was not rehired, and began writing and singing his own songs for demo purposes. “I never really chose songwriting,” he says. “It just absorbed me and became more and more important in my life.”[20]

Diamond’s first recording contract was billed as “Neil and Jack”, an Everly Brothers-type duo comprising Diamond and high school friend Jack Packer.[11] They recorded two unsuccessful singles: “You Are My Love at Last” b/w “What Will I Do” and “I’m Afraid” b/w “Till You’ve Tried Love”, both released in 1962. Cashbox and Billboard magazines gave all four sides excellent reviews. Later in 1962, Diamond signed with Columbia Records as a solo performer. In July 1963 Columbia released the single “At Night” b/w “Clown Town”, which Billboard gave an excellent review to Clown Town and Cashbox gave both sides excellent reviews, but it still failed to chart. Columbia dropped him from their label and he went back to writing songs in and out of publishing houses for the next seven years.

He wrote wherever he could, including on buses, and used an upright piano above the Birdland Club in New York City. One of the causes of this early nomadic life as a songwriter was his songs’ wordiness: “I’d spent a lot of time on lyrics, and they were looking for hooks, and I didn’t really understand the nature of that,” he says.[20]

During those years, he was able to sell only about one song a week, barely enough to survive on. He found himself earning enough to spend only 35 cents a day on food (US$3 in 2017 dollars[24]).[20] But the privacy he had above the Birdland Club allowed him to focus on writing without distractions; as he explained, “Something new began to happen. I wasn’t under the gun, and suddenly interesting songs began to happen, songs that had things none of the others did.”[20] Among them were “Cherry, Cherry” and “Solitary Man”. “Solitary Man” was the first record Diamond recorded under his own name that made the charts. It remains one of his personal all-time favorites, as it was about his early years as a songwriter, even though he failed to realize it at the time:

It wasn’t until years later, when I went into Freudian analysis, that I understood that it was me. It was an outgrowth of my despair.[10]:37

Diamond spent his early career as a songwriter in the Brill Building. His first success as a songwriter came in November 1965, with “Sunday and Me”, a Top 20 hit for Jay and the Americans. Greater success followed with “I’m a Believer”, “A Little Bit Me, a Little Bit You”, “Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)”, and “Love to Love”, all performed by the Monkees. Diamond wrote and recorded the songs for himself, but the cover versions were released before his own.[26] The unintended, but happy, consequence was that Diamond began to gain fame not only as a singer and performer, but also as a songwriter. “I’m a Believer” became a gold record within two days of its release, and stayed at the top of the charts for seven weeks, making it the Popular Music Song of the Year in 1966.[10]:44

“And the Grass Won’t Pay No Mind” brought covers from Elvis Presley (who also interpreted “Sweet Caroline”) and Mark Lindsay, former lead singer for Paul Revere & the Raiders. Other notable artists who recorded his early songs were the English hard-rock band Deep Purple, Lulu, and Cliff Richard.[c]

In 1966, Diamond signed a deal with Bert Berns’s Bang Records, then a subsidiary of Atlantic. His first release on that label, “Solitary Man”, became his first true hit as a solo artist.[d] Diamond later followed with “Cherry, Cherry” and “Kentucky Woman”.[10]:37

His early concerts saw him as a “special guest” of, or opening for, everyone from Herman’s Hermits to, on one occasion, the Who.[10]:45 As a guest performer with The Who, he was shocked to see Pete Townshendswinging his guitar like a club and then throwing it against walls and off the stage until the instrument’s neck broke. It was the first time he had seen a band smashing their instruments and amplifiers to pieces.[10]:46

Diamond began to feel restricted by Bang Records, because he wanted to record more ambitious, introspective music, like his autobiographical “Brooklyn Roads” from 1968. Berns wanted to release “Kentucky Woman” as a single, but Diamond was no longer satisfied writing simple pop songs, so he proposed “Shilo”, which was not about the Civil War but rather an imaginary childhood friend. Bang believed that the song wasn’t commercial enough, so it was relegated to being an LP track on “Just for You”. In addition to being dissatisfied with his royalties, Diamond tried to sign with another record label after discovering a loophole in his contract that did not bind him exclusively to either WEB IV or Tallyrand, but the result was a series of lawsuits that coincided with a slump in his record sales and professional success. A magistrate refused WEB IV’s request for a temporary injunction to prevent Diamond from joining another record company while his contract dispute continued in court, but the lawsuits persisted until February 18, 1977, when he triumphed in court and purchased the rights to his Bang-era master tapes.

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-10T14:00:25+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 10 Aug 2018 14:00:25 +0000 31, in pop music

 

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“Rio – Duran Duran”

“Rio – Duran Duran”

Rio is the second studio album by English new wave/synthpop band Duran Duran, originally released worldwide on 10 May 1982. It reached #2 in the UK and #1 in Australia.
The album was re-released in the United States in November 1982. It earned a Gold disc on 1 March 1983, and went Platinum on 26 April 1983, eventually reaching Double Platinum status. It peaked at number six on the Billboard 200 album chart in the US on 12 March 1983, and remained on the chart for 129 weeks.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-06T09:45:43+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 06 Aug 2018 09:45:43 +0000 31, in pop music

 

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“The Rascals – It’s A Beautiful Morning”

“The Rascals – It’s A Beautiful Morning”

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“A Beautiful Morning” is a song written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and recorded by The Rascals. Coming out in early 1968, it was the group’s first single released under that name rather than The Young Rascals. The first album on which the song appeared was Time Peace: The Rascals’ Greatest Hits. It continued the theme of carefree optimism that had distinguished the previous year’s “Groovin'”. The song was a big hit in the United States, reaching number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also reaching number 36 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.[1] It was RIAA-certified as a Million Seller on June 28, 1968. The song had an introductory sound of mystical wind chimes and bells.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-06T08:30:52+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 06 Aug 2018 08:30:52 +0000 31, in American music artists, classic music, male vocal group, pop music, r&b, r&b history

 

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“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

Chameleon is the sixth album by American singing trio Labelle. Though Patti LaBelle’s autobiography Don’t Block The Blessings revealed that LaBelle planned a follow-up to Chameleon entitled Shaman, the album never materialized. The trio would not release another new recording until 2008’s Back to Now. The final album was moderately successful peaking at #94 at the Pop charts and #21 on the R&B charts. Only two singles made the charts which were “Get You Somebody New” which peaked at #50 on the Pop charts and their memorable song “Isn’t It A Shame” which debuted at #18 on the R&B charts. “Isn’t It A Shame” was later sampled by Nelly on his 2004 hit, “My Place”, which featured Jaheim.

Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patti LaBelle, is an American singer, author, actress, and entrepreneur. LaBelle began her career in the early 1960s as lead singer and front woman of the vocal group, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles. Following the group’s name change to Labelle in the early 1970s, she released the iconic disco song “Lady Marmalade” and the group later became the first African-American vocal group to land the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.[1] After the group split in 1976, LaBelle began a successful solo career, starting with her critically acclaimed debut album, which included the career-defining song, “You Are My Friend”. LaBelle became a mainstream solo star in 1984 following the success of the singles, “If Only You Knew”, “New Attitude” and “Stir It Up”, with the latter two crossing over to pop audiences becoming radio staples.[1]

Early life and career

Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles

Patti joined a local church choir at the Beulah Baptist Church at ten and performed her first solo two years later, while she also grew up listening to secular music styles such as R&B and jazz music. When she was fifteen, she won a talent competition at her high school. This success led to Patti forming her first singing group, the Ordettes, in 1960, with schoolmates Jean Brown, Yvonne Hogen and Johnnie Dawson.[7] The group, with Patti as front woman, became a local attraction until two of its members left to marry.[8] In 1962, the Ordettes included three new members, Cindy Birdsong, Sarah Dash and Nona Hendryx, the latter two girls having sung for another defunct vocal group.[8] That year, they auditioned for local record label owner Harold Robinson. Robinson agreed to work with the group after Patti began singing the song “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”. Initially Robinson was dismissive of Patti due to him feeling Patti was “too dark and too plain”.[8] Shortly after signing them, he had them record as the Blue Belles and they were selected to promote the recording of “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”, which had been recorded by The Starlets, but was assigned as a Blue Belles single due to label conflict.[8] The Starlets’ manager sued Harold Robinson after the Blue Belles were seen performing a lip-synching version of the song on American Bandstand.[8] After settling out of court, Robinson altered the group’s name to “Patti LaBelle and The Blue Belles”.[8] Initially, a Billboard ad cited the group as “Patti Bell and the Blue Bells”.[9] In 1963, the group scored their first hit single with the ballad “Down the Aisle (The Wedding Song)” which became a crossover top 40 hit on the Billboard pop and R&B charts after King Records issued it. Later in the year, they recorded their rendition of the standard “You’ll Never Walk Alone”; the single was later re-released on Cameo-Parkway Records where the group scored a second hit on the pop charts with the song in 1964. Another charted single, “Danny Boy”, was released that same year. In 1965, after Cameo-Parkway folded, the group moved to New York and signed with Atlantic Records where they recorded twelve singles for the label, including the mildly charted singles “All or Nothing” and “Take Me for a Little While”. The group’s Atlantic tenure included their rendition of “Over the Rainbow” and a version of the song “Groovy Kind of Love”. In 1967, Birdsong left the group to join The Supremes and by 1970 the group had been dropped from Atlantic Records as well as by their longtime manager Bernard Montague. That year, Vicki Wickham, producer of the UK music show, Ready, Steady, Go, agreed to manage the group after Dusty Springfield mentioned signing them. Wickham’s first direction for the group was for them to change their name to simply Labelle and advised the group to renew their act, going for a more homegrown look and sound that reflected psychedelic soul. In 1971, the group opened for The Who in several stops on the group’s U.S. tour.

Labelle signed with the Warner Music imprint, Track Records, and released their self-titled debut album in 1971. The record’s psychedelic soul sound and its blending of rock and soul rhythms was a departure from the group’s early sound. That same year, they sang background vocals on Laura Nyro’s album, Gonna Take a Miracle. A year later, in 1972, the group released Moon Shadow, which repeated the homegrown gritty sound of the previous album. In 1973, influenced by glam rockers David Bowie and Elton John, Wickham had the group dressed in silver space suits and luminescent makeup.[10] After their third successive album, Pressure Cookin’, failed to generate a hit, Labelle signed with Epic Records in 1974, releasing their most successful album to date, with Nightbirds, which blended soul, funk and rock music, thanks to the work of the album’s producer, Allen Toussaint. The single, “Lady Marmalade”, would become their biggest-selling single, going number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over a million copies, as did Nightbirds, which later earned a RIAA gold award, for sales of a million units. In October 1974, Labelle made pop history by becoming the first rock and roll vocal group to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House.[11] Riding high on the success of “Lady Marmalade” and the Nightbirds album, Labelle made the cover of Rolling Stone in 1975. Labelle released two more albums, Chameleon and Phoenix in 1975 and 1976 respectively. While both albums continued the group’s critical success, none of the singles issued on those albums ever crossed over to the pop charts.

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-04T10:25:07+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 04 Aug 2018 10:25:07 +0000 31, in black music artists, jazz, music, pop music, r&b

 

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“Dr. John – Accentuate the positive”

Malcolm John Rebennack (born November 21, 1940), better known by his stage name Dr. John, is an American singer and songwriter. His music combines blues, pop, jazz, boogie woogie and rock and roll.

Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive” is a popularsong which was published in 1944. The music was written by Harold Arlen and the lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The song was nominated for the “Academy Award for Best Original Song” at the 18th Academy Awards in 1945 after being used in the film Here Come the Waves. It is sung in the style of a sermon, and explains that accentuating the positive is key to happiness. In describing his inspiration for the lyric, Mercer told the Pop Chronicles radio documentary “[my] publicity agent … went to hear Father Divine and he had a sermon and his subject was ‘you got to accentuate the positive and eliminate the negative.’ And I said ‘Wow, that’s a colorful phrase!'”

Mercer recorded the song, with The Pied Pipers and Paul Weston‘s orchestra, on October 4, 1944, and it was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 180. The record first reached the Billboard magazinecharts on January 4, 1945, and lasted 13 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 2. The song was number five on Billboard’s Annual High School Survey in 1945.

On March 25, 2015, it was announced that Mercer’s version would be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-03T12:40:39+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 03 Aug 2018 12:40:39 +0000 31, in blues, jazz, pop music

 

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“Angie Baby- Helen Reddy”

“Angie Baby- Helen Reddy”

Angie Baby” is a popular song that was written by American Alan O’Day, and became a hit for Australian singer Helen Reddy. The song reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100chart at the end of December 1974 and became one of Reddy’s biggest-selling singles. The song also topped the U.S. adult contemporary chart, Reddy’s fifth #1 on this chart.

The song’s cryptic lyrics have inspired a number of listener theories as to what the song is really about. Reddy has refused to comment on what the true storyline of the song is, partly because she has said she enjoys hearing other listeners’ interpretations. Reddy has also said that “Angie Baby” was the one song she never had to push radio stations into playing.

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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-29T10:15:37+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 29 Jul 2018 10:15:37 +0000 31, in 1970s, country music, pop music, retro

 

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