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“Fou Eteru – DEAR UA OU MISIA OE (cover-Mareko P – Eteru)  Dear I Miss You” 

“Fou Eteru – DEAR UA OU MISIA OE (cover-Mareko P – Eteru)  Dear I Miss You” 

Mark Sagapolutele[1] (born 15 June 1981), best known by his stage name Mareko, is a New Zealand rapper and hip hop artist of Samoan descent from South Auckland.

Mareko’s career began as a member of the Deceptikonz, a South Auckland rap crew. The group won accolades in 2001, receiving nominations for several New Zealand music awards. Mareko released a solo album, White Sunday, in 2003, which peaked at #4 in New Zealand.[2]Two singles from the album hit the New Zealand singles charts that year: “Mareko (Here to Stay)” (#4) and “Stop, Drop and Roll” (#6; credited to Mareko feat. Deceptikonz).[3] In 2006, Mareko returned to the charts with a guest appearance on Tha Feelstyle’s #17 single, “I Do Believe (Tha Remix)”.[3]

en.m.wikipedia.org


LYRICS:  “Dear I Miss You” translated to English

The feeling that my desire
For many days
In no my feelings
forget my vow
My beloved is

Considering, Dear, what have we done
As a burden I can not
The intuitive, Baby air, let answered
The force suffered
and weak

RESPONSE:
Can, Dear, a sleep
I miss you
The scent eating, my honey,
I want to see
Standing in my feelings
end my love
Are you aware of my desire,
Honey, you feel

I can hardly forgotten
Your beautiful days
Forget that one
What now I wait
for you dear

Admiration for you and hate
I love the double
As you heard, Baby air, let answered
The force trauma and fatigue

{ANSWER}

Baby is my prayer
God, immediately a day
The intuitive, Mahoney air, let out
Miss you, my love is near

 
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Posted by on May 19, 2017 in pacific islands

 

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“Ae A taua”  (How ’bout Us)  – Ben Vai




Born in Samoa. Raised mainly in Jamaica, now back in Samoa making beautiful music. Style of music, loves his reggae, ragga, but sings beautiful soul..awesome voice. Has two albums out, his own originals ‘LOST & FOUND’ and a samoan album “TAIMI O LE AFIAFI’. Currently in the studio recording 2 albums back to back. So looking forward to that. Out around end of Febuary 2010.

http://www.last.fm

How ’bout Us Lyrics
(Ooooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Oh-oh-oooh-hooo

(Oh-oh-oooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Ooooh, short and sweet

No sense in draggin’ on past our needs

Let’s don’t keep it hangin’ on

If the fire’s out

We should both be gone

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
(Some people can hold it together)

(Last) through all kinds of weather

Can we

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Oh-oh-oooh-hooo

(Oh-oh-oooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)
Now don’t you get me wrong

(What you sayin’ to me, baby)

Cause I’m not tryin’ now

To end it all

(Let’s start something new)

It’s just that I have seen

(What have you seen)

Too many lover’s hearts lose their dream

(We won’t lose it)

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
(Some people can hold it together)

(Last) through all kinds of weather

Can we
(How ’bout us)

(How ’bout us, baby)

(How ’bout us)

(How about us, baby)

(How ’bout us)

(How ’bout us, baby)
Are we gonna make it, girl

Or are we gonna drift and drift and drift

Together again

Ooooh, love

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)

How ’bout us, baby
(Some people can hold it together)

Some people can hold it together

(Last) whoooa-ooh

How ’bout us

Some people

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

Some people can love one another for life

(How ’bout us)

How ’bout us, baby
(Some people can hold it together)

Some people can hold it together

(Laaast through)

How ’bout us
How ’bout us, baby
(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

Some people can love one another for life

(How ’bout us)

You and me, baby

(Some people can hold it together)

Hold it together

(Laaast through)

Can we

Say that we can make it, baby
(Some people are made for each other)

Whoooa, yeah

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
http://www.lyricsfreak.com

 
 

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“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

Armando Rehia Dante Castagnoli was born in Tahiti to an Italian father and Tahitian mother. The third of seven children, his father was a strict taskmaster when it came to his children’s music, and “Mando” and his brothers would march several miles every Sunday playing their instruments before they got to play in the ocean with their friends. That early discipline paid off and Armando’s obvious gifts as a saxophone player and musician were encouraged by Professors from the Music Conservatory of Paris. When his family moved to Powell River B.CAfter graduation Mando moved to Toronto and studied at Humber College with world famous teacher, Pat LaBarbera, who played with Buddy Rich, Woody Herman and the legendary Elvin Jones. In 1984 Armando won the highest award at the BC WOODWIND FINALS.
Mando recorded his first CD, THE BUBBLEHEADS, at the age of 20 and for the next six years was active in the Toronto music scene playing Jazz, Blues, and R&B and becoming proficient at alto, tenor, and soprano saxophone as well as flute and percussion.

In the 90′s Armando acted as the musical director and featured soloist at the famous CLUB NEW ORLEANS in Papeete, Tahiti, and had the opportunity to work with greats like Nathan East, Jimmie Earl, Freddie Ravel, and many more. His collaboration with jazz singer, Chris Bennett, took him to Berlin, Germany and live recordings and guest appearances at the A-TRANE, one of the world’s great jazz clubs. His soldout appearances in Berlin and Los Angeles hi-lite Mando’s unique and beautiful tone, sometimes compared to Stan Getz, as well as his incredible showmanship.

With homebase in his island paradise of Tahiti, Mando now occasionally tours the world with stars such as Otmaro Ruiz, Felix Vilchez,Chris Bennett and more. He has recorded with the legendary Leon Ware and has produced and written several of his own CDs including DANCE FOR PLANET EARTH, now available at CD Baby and I-Tunes. The title cut, AORI NO TE FENUA, is the theme song for the TAHITI MUSIC FESTIVAL. Produced by Armando Castagnoli and Chris Bennett, the 2012 festival will raise awareness of how we can save our oceans and islands such as Tahiti and will bring musicians from all over the world together in unity and celebration.
http://armandocastagnoli.com/bio/


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“ONO’U TAHITI FESTIVAL GRAFFITI” 

“ONO’U TAHITI FESTIVAL GRAFFITI” 


artwork: http://la1ere.francetvinfo.fr/polynesie/tahiti/

Welcome to the international festival of graffiti ONO’U in Tahiti!

First ever international graffiti event (2014) hosted in Tahiti, the ONO’U festival is created and supported by a young Polynesian company, Tahiti New Generation, specialized in the creation and production of international artistic and cultural events.

Tahiti New Generation 

The ONO’U festival is created and supported by a young Polynesian company, Tahiti New Generation, specialized in the creation and production of international artistic and cultural events. Entrance to the festival will offer participants a unique opportunity to enjoy amazing graffiti live paintings by some of today’s major international graffiti writers and Tahitian artists. If Gauguin were alive today, he would surely have been among this group of creative people helping to pave the way for urban contemporary art in beautiful French Polynesia. 

More info at source:  http://tahitifestivalgraffiti.com/

2017: Ono'u and the street art already at the 
rendezvous

The Tahiti street art museum, created in October 2016, starts 2017 by inviting artists to perform new performances in Tahiti. This space dedicated to contemporary urban art allows to discover various achievements and starts this new year under the sign of street art.

http://la1ere.francetvinfo.fr/polynesie/tahiti/polynesie-francaise/2017-ono-u-street-art-deja-au-rendez-vous-433497.html

 

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 “Hula Blues” 



image: dobro hulu blus duolian


John Avery Noble (September 17, 1892, Honolulu, Hawaii – January 13, 1944, Honolulu), better known as Johnny Noble, was an American musician, composer and arranger. He was one of the key figures behind the development of the hapa haole style of music in Honolulu, and played a leading role in introducing Hawaiian music to the United States.[1]

Early lifeEdit

Johnny Noble was born in Honolulu, Hawaii on September 17, 1892. He was exposed to music from an early age, listening to band concerts on Sunday afternoons in Kapiolani Park, and traditional singing in local churches. He attended Kaiulani School, and in his spare time sold newspapers on the streets of Honolulu and entertained passers-by whistling popular tunes.[2]His high school education was at Saint Louis School, where he learned to play drums, piano and guitar. He graduated from school in 1911 and went to work at the Mutual Telephone Company in Honolulu, where he continued working long after he became a successful musician.[3]

CareerEdit

In 1917, Noble was hired by Ernest Ka’ai who was musical director at many Honolulu hotels.[4] Noble worked part-time as a drummer at several theaters before meeting Sonny Cunha, a well known Honolulu musician. Cunha was born in 1879, also in Honolulu, and developed the hapa haole (half-Hawaiian) sound in 1900 by mixing traditional Hawaiian music and American ragtime.[5] In 1918 Noble became a member of Cunha’s band playing drums and xylophone, and soon was well acquainted with the hapa haole. Cunha was Noble’s mentor and, among other things, taught Noble composition. Noble adopted Cunha’s music to blend jazz and blues with Hawaiian music to produce a new style of hapa haole. While conservatives complained that this new music “degrad[ed] and commercializ[ed]” traditional Hawaiian music, it was very popular with audiences in Honolulu.[6]

Noble went on to become an arranger and a band leader. In 1920 he led Honolulu’s Moana Hotel orchestra, introducing his new music to the band’s repertoire.[7] He later ended up supervising most of Honolulu’s hotels and country club entertainment.[2] In 1924 Noble was chosen as Hawaii’s delegate at a Music Trade Convention in San Francisco, where he took the opportunity to look for new ideas to incorporate in his music. Over the next few years Noble and his band publicized Hawaiian music by means of recordings, radio broadcasts, performances on cruise ships and tours of mainland America.[8] Noble played a leading role in introducing and popularizing Hawaiian music in the United States.[1]

Noble composed a number of hapa haole tunes, including “My Little Grass Shack“, “King Kamehameha” and “Hula Blues”. He also popularized the traditional “Hawaiian War Chant” song.[2]Noble published hundreds of traditional Hawaiian songs in their original form, and reworked many to “Western scale and contemporary instrumentation”.[1]He made over a 100 recordings, which included 110 songs for Brunswick Records.[2]

 
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Posted by on May 12, 2017 in music, pacific islands

 

Menu In The Sky – New Zealand (South Pacific)

How comfortable would you be, having an exquisite, delicious meal midair New Zealand?


“Dinner in the Sky is a hosted dining table, suspended at a height of 50 metres by a team of professionals”.


https://m.facebook.com/DinnerintheskyANZ/


New Zealand’s cuisine is largely driven by local ingredients and seasonal variations. An island nation with a primarily agricultural economy, New Zealand yields produce from land and sea. Similar to the cuisine of Australia, the cuisine of New Zealand is a diverse British-based cuisine, with Mediterranean and Pacific Rim influences as the country becomes more cosmopolitan.

Historical influences came from Māori cultureNew American cuisineSoutheast AsianEast Asian, and South Asian culinary traditions have become popular since the 1970s.

In New Zealand households, dinner is the main meal of the day, when families gather and share their evening together. Restaurants and takeaways provide an increasing proportion of the diet.

Māori cuisineEdit

hāngi dinner as served to tourists.

When the indigenous Māori arrived in New Zealand from tropical Polynesia they had a number of food plants, including kūmara (sweet potato), taro and . The plants grew well only in the north of the North Island. Native New Zealand plants such as fernroot became a more important part of the diet, along with insects such as the huhu grub. Problems with horticulture were made up for by an abundance of bird and marine life. The large flightless moa were soon hunted to extinction.[citation needed] Rāhui (resource restrictions) included forbidding the hunting of certain species in particular places or at certain times of year, so that the numbers could regenerate.

Preparation of a modern hāngi for tourists at Mitai Maori Village, Rotorua.

Like other Polynesian people, Māori cooked food in earth ovens, known in New Zealand as hāngi, although the word umu is also used[citation needed] as in other Pacific languages. Stones are heated by fire and food packed in leaves are placed on top. The packs are further covered with foliage and cloth, or, wet sacks, then earth. Other cooking methods included roasting and, in geothermal areas, boiling or steaming using natural hot springs and pools. Occasionally food would be boiled in non-geothermal areas by putting hot stones into a bowl with water and the food; and some food was also cooked over the open fire. Some foods were preserved using smoke, air-drying, or layers of fat—particularly muttonbirds. Māori were one of the few people to have no form of alcoholic beverage.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Dinner at Sky Tower, Auckland” 


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“SamoaFood.com How to make three kinds of Kopai” 

“SamoaFood.com How to make three kinds of Kopai” 

AND ALSO TRY THESE (also Pacific Islands) TAHITIAN RECIPES:

SWEET AND TANGY CHICKEN TAHITIAN

15 minPrep Time

30 minCook Time

45 minTotal Time

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1/2 cup Kikkoman Less Sodium Soy Sauce
  • one (20 oz.) can Dole Pineapple Chunks in Pineapple Juice
  • 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons dried onion flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kikkoman Sriracha Sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon cornstarch

  • 1 Tablespoon water
  • 1 3/4 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • 1 Tablespoon sesame seeds (optional)
  • 2 Tablespoons sliced green onions (optional)

Instructions

  1. Pre heat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the cornstarch and water. Stir until the cornstarch is completely dissolved. Set aside.
  3. In a medium saucepan, heat the oil over medium high heat. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.
  4. Add the soy sauce, pineapple chunks with their juice, brown sugar, onion flakes, sriracha sauce and worcestershire sauce. Bring mixture to a boil Reduce heat to low and add the cornstarch and water mixture. Stir. Cook for 2 minutes until the sauce thickens.
  5. Arrange the chicken breasts in a 7 x 11 baking dish. Pour the sauce over and place in a 350 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes or until chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees.
  6. Serve over Minute Rice and garnish with sesame seeds and green onions.

http://www.foodblogs.com/

     

     LUAU RIBS


      PREP TIME

      20 mins

    COOK TIME

    1 hour 45 mins

    TOTAL TIME

    2 hours 5 mins

    Serves: 4

    INGREDIENTS

    • 2 racks (4 lb)
    • baby back ribs or 4 lb regular spare ribs
    • salt
    • pepper
    • Sauce:
    • 1 cup pureed peaches*
    • ⅓ cup ketchup
    • ⅓ cup cider vinegar
    • 5 garlic cloves, minced
    • 2 tbs soy sauce
    • ½ cup brown sugar
    • 2 tsp ginger

    INSTRUCTIONS

    1. *Strained baby food peaches are fine, but you can also puree drained, canned peaches in a blender, strainer attachement or Ninja
    2. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Line a large baking pan with aluminum foil (for easy clean up).
    3. Mix all sauce ingredients in a small bowl.
    4. Cut ribs into serving portions, single ribs for regular spare ribs and 2 ribs for baby backs. Lay ribs in a single layer in prepared baking pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
    5. Bake at 450 degrees F for 15 minutes. Remove from oven, drain all liquid from the pan and reduce oven temp to 350 degrees F.Pour sauce over ribs and cover pan with foil. Place in 350 degree oven and bake for 1½ hours, basting with sauce every 30 minutes. Remove foil cover during last 30 minutes of baking time.Coat ribs with thickened sauce in the bottom of the pan and serve immediately.SLOW COOKERPlace all ingredients in slow cooker and cook for 6-8 hours on low. Sauce may be reduced in a saucepan on the stovetop if desired.

     

    More at: bakeatmidnight.com




     
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    Posted by on April 24, 2017 in brunch, pacific islands

     

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