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Category Archives: pacific islands

“Ae A taua”  (How ’bout Us)  – Ben Vai




Born in Samoa. Raised mainly in Jamaica, now back in Samoa making beautiful music. Style of music, loves his reggae, ragga, but sings beautiful soul..awesome voice. Has two albums out, his own originals ‘LOST & FOUND’ and a samoan album “TAIMI O LE AFIAFI’. Currently in the studio recording 2 albums back to back. So looking forward to that. Out around end of Febuary 2010.

http://www.last.fm

How ’bout Us Lyrics
(Ooooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Oh-oh-oooh-hooo

(Oh-oh-oooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Ooooh, short and sweet

No sense in draggin’ on past our needs

Let’s don’t keep it hangin’ on

If the fire’s out

We should both be gone

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
(Some people can hold it together)

(Last) through all kinds of weather

Can we

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Oh-oh-oooh-hooo

(Oh-oh-oooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)
Now don’t you get me wrong

(What you sayin’ to me, baby)

Cause I’m not tryin’ now

To end it all

(Let’s start something new)

It’s just that I have seen

(What have you seen)

Too many lover’s hearts lose their dream

(We won’t lose it)

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
(Some people can hold it together)

(Last) through all kinds of weather

Can we
(How ’bout us)

(How ’bout us, baby)

(How ’bout us)

(How about us, baby)

(How ’bout us)

(How ’bout us, baby)
Are we gonna make it, girl

Or are we gonna drift and drift and drift

Together again

Ooooh, love

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)

How ’bout us, baby
(Some people can hold it together)

Some people can hold it together

(Last) whoooa-ooh

How ’bout us

Some people

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

Some people can love one another for life

(How ’bout us)

How ’bout us, baby
(Some people can hold it together)

Some people can hold it together

(Laaast through)

How ’bout us
How ’bout us, baby
(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

Some people can love one another for life

(How ’bout us)

You and me, baby

(Some people can hold it together)

Hold it together

(Laaast through)

Can we

Say that we can make it, baby
(Some people are made for each other)

Whoooa, yeah

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
http://www.lyricsfreak.com

 
 

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Menu In The Sky – New Zealand (South Pacific)

How comfortable would you be, having an exquisite, delicious meal midair New Zealand?


“Dinner in the Sky is a hosted dining table, suspended at a height of 50 metres by a team of professionals”.


https://m.facebook.com/DinnerintheskyANZ/


New Zealand’s cuisine is largely driven by local ingredients and seasonal variations. An island nation with a primarily agricultural economy, New Zealand yields produce from land and sea. Similar to the cuisine of Australia, the cuisine of New Zealand is a diverse British-based cuisine, with Mediterranean and Pacific Rim influences as the country becomes more cosmopolitan.

Historical influences came from Māori cultureNew American cuisineSoutheast AsianEast Asian, and South Asian culinary traditions have become popular since the 1970s.

In New Zealand households, dinner is the main meal of the day, when families gather and share their evening together. Restaurants and takeaways provide an increasing proportion of the diet.

Māori cuisineEdit

hāngi dinner as served to tourists.

When the indigenous Māori arrived in New Zealand from tropical Polynesia they had a number of food plants, including kūmara (sweet potato), taro and . The plants grew well only in the north of the North Island. Native New Zealand plants such as fernroot became a more important part of the diet, along with insects such as the huhu grub. Problems with horticulture were made up for by an abundance of bird and marine life. The large flightless moa were soon hunted to extinction.[citation needed] Rāhui (resource restrictions) included forbidding the hunting of certain species in particular places or at certain times of year, so that the numbers could regenerate.

Preparation of a modern hāngi for tourists at Mitai Maori Village, Rotorua.

Like other Polynesian people, Māori cooked food in earth ovens, known in New Zealand as hāngi, although the word umu is also used[citation needed] as in other Pacific languages. Stones are heated by fire and food packed in leaves are placed on top. The packs are further covered with foliage and cloth, or, wet sacks, then earth. Other cooking methods included roasting and, in geothermal areas, boiling or steaming using natural hot springs and pools. Occasionally food would be boiled in non-geothermal areas by putting hot stones into a bowl with water and the food; and some food was also cooked over the open fire. Some foods were preserved using smoke, air-drying, or layers of fat—particularly muttonbirds. Māori were one of the few people to have no form of alcoholic beverage.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Dinner at Sky Tower, Auckland” 


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“Tattoos! Taboo? You Choose!”  

“Tattoos! Taboo? You Choose!”  

Should we assume them to be self- proclaimed beauty marks, love markers, fads, expressive works of art, self-persecution, or, could tattoos be an inherent cultural practice proclaimed as one’s rights of passage? (AOC) AMERICA ON COFFEE

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History of Polynesian Tattoos|Tribal Tattoo Designs for Men and WomenNearly everyone in ancient Polynesian society was tattooed. The revival of Polynesian lost art: Shortly after the missionaries arrival (1797) the practice was strictly banned, as the Old Testament forbids it. In recent years, however, the art of tattooing has enjoyed a renaissance in the early 1980’s.

https://www.tahititatou.com

AN OVERALL HISTORY:

Tattooing has been practiced across the globe since at least Neolithic times, as evidenced by mummified preserved skin, ancient art, and the archaeological record.[1] Both ancient art and archaeological finds of possible tattoo tools suggest tattooing was practiced by the Upper Paleolithic period in Europe. However, direct evidence for tattooing on mummified human skin extends only to the 4th millennium BC. The oldest discovery of tattooed human skin to date is found on the body of Ötzi the Iceman, dating to between 3370 and 3100 BC.[2] Other tattooed mummies have been recovered from at least 49 archaeological sites including locations in Greenland, Alaska, Siberia, Mongolia, western China, Egypt, Sudan, the Philippines, and the Andes.[3] These include Amunet, Priestess of the Goddess Hathor from ancient Egypt (c. 2134–1991 BC), multiple mummies from Siberia including the Pazyryk culture of Russia, and from several cultures throughout pre-ColumbianSouth America.[2]That tattooing was somehow “reintroduced” to the Western world following European voyages to Polynesia is a myth.

[41] Tattooing has been consistently present in Western society from the modern period stretching back to Ancient Greece.[42][43][dubious ] Although Captain James Cook’s voyages to the South Pacific imported the Polynesian word “tatau” (as “tattow”, later changed to “tattoo”), tattooing was not novel at the time. A long history of European tattoo predated these voyages, including among sailors and tradesmen, pilgrims visiting the Holy Land, and on Europeans living among Native Americans.[44][45]The first documented professional tattoo artist in the USA was Martin Hildebrandt, a German immigrant who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1846[citation needed]. Between 1861 and 1865, he tattooed soldiers on both sides in the American Civil War. The first documented professional tattooist (with a permanent studio, working on members of the paying public) in Britain was Sutherland Macdonald in the early 1880s. Tattooing was an expensive and painful process, and by the late 1880s had become a mark of wealth for the crowned heads of Europe.[citation needed]

Since the 1970s, tattoos have become a mainstream part of global and Western fashion, common among both sexes, to all economic classes, and to age groups from the later teen years to middle age. For many young Americans, the tattoo has taken on a decidedly different meaning than for previous generations. The tattoo has “undergone dramatic redefinition” and has shifted from a form of deviance to an acceptable form of expression.[46] In 2010, 25% of Australians under age 30 had tattoos.[47]

Tattoos have experienced a resurgence in popularity in many parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Japan, and North and South America. The growth in tattoo culture has seen an influx of new artists into the industry, many of whom have technical and fine arts training. Coupled with advancements in tattoo pigments and the ongoing refinement of the equipment used for tattooing, this has led to an improvement in the quality of tattoos being produced.[49]

The clientele changed from sailors, bikers, and gang members to the middle and upper class. There was also a shift in iconography from the badge-like images based on repetitive pre-made designs known as flash to customized full-body tattoo influenced by Polynesian and Japanese tattoo art, known as sleeves, which are categorized under the relatively new and popular Avant-garde genre.[53] Tattooers transformed into “Tattoo Artists”: men and women with fine art backgrounds began to enter the profession alongside the older, traditional tattooists.As various kinds of social movements progressed bodily inscription crossed class boundaries, and became common among the general public. Specifically, the tattoo is one access point for revolutionary aesthetics of women. Feminist theory has much to say on the subject. “Bodies of Subversion: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo”, by Margot Mifflin, became the first history of women’s tattoo art when it was released in 1997. In it, she documents women’s involvement in tattooing coinciding to feminist successes, with surges in the 1880s, 1920s, and the 1970s.[56] The earliest appearance of tattoos on women were in the circus in the late 19th century. These “Tattooed Ladies” were covered – with the exception of their faces, hands, necks, and other readily visible areas – with various images inked into their skin. In order to lure the crowd, the earliest ladies, like Betty Broadbent and Nora Hildebrandt told tales of captivity; they usually claimed to have been taken hostage by Native Americans that tattooed them as a form of torture. However, by the late 1920s the sideshow industry was slowing and by the late 1990s the last tattooed lady was out of business.[57] Today, women sometimes use tattoos as forms of bodily reclamations after traumatic experiences like abuse or breast cancer.[56] In 2012, tattooed women outnumbered men for the first time in American history – according to a Harris poll, 23% of women in America had tattoos in that year, compared to 19% of men.[58] In 2013, Miss Kansas, Theresa Vail, became the first Miss America contestant to show off tattoos during the swimsuit competition — the insignia of the U.S. Army Dental Corps on her left shoulder and one of the “Serenity Prayer” along the right side of her torso.[59]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

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Tahiti’s wild side: More than a honeymoon hotspot

Tahiti’s wild side: More than a honeymoon hotspot

Featured image:https://m.facebook.com/TIB/Athrowback_story_fbi

Tahiti has plenty of action beyond the beach, as Lucy Gillmore discovered.

ft;margin-right:6px;”>By Lucy Gillmore.

Hilton resort, Moorea

‘Bora is boring.” With a Gallic shrug, Thibault, the manager of the chic new gourmet restaurant on Moorea, Le Coco’s, dismissed the island that has been enticing honeymooners to its reef-wrapped sands since the first resort was built in 1961.

Bora Bora, a byword for a Garden of Eden tropical paradise, has style in spades, but no substance, apparently. Within its ring of coral reef-fringed resorts time seems to have a dream-like quality as visitors gaze soulfully into each other’s eyes, wander across silken sand, paddle a turquoise sea – and not much else, or at least that was the gist.

Not that I would know. I was bypassing Bora Bora’s romantic torpor for an adventure-packed, culture-laced trip to three other French Polynesian islands: Moorea, Taha’a and that other bucket-list fantasy, Tahiti. French Polynesia’s 118 islands are sprinkled like confetti across an area the size of Europe – 5.5 million square kilometres of ocean – and clustered into five archipelagos: the Society, Tuamotu, Gambier, Marquesas and Austral islands.

Tahiti, Moorea and Taha’a are part of the 14-strong Society archipelago, named by Captain Cook in the 18th century. Now, as then, they tick all the traditional paradise boxes: palm trees, white sand, turquoise water, Finding Nemo on a loop beneath the surface. After crossing half the globe rather more swiftly than Cook, I was greeted at Tahiti airport with a garland of intoxicatingly heady tiare flowers. This is the place that seduced the likes of Paul Gauguin and, more recently, the late Marlon Brando, who bought an atoll, Tetiaroa, after filming Mutiny on the Bounty there in the 1960s. Last year, it opened to guests as The Brando resort.

Tahiti itself, however, is often just the jumping-off point for misty-eyed honeymooners. But, those who bypass it are missing a trick. The rugged, volcanic interior is straight out of Jurassic Park. You can climb to the top of Fautau’a waterfall, cascading 135 metres through a series of basins, or scale Mount Aora’I, a full-day trek around eight hours – or two days if you bed down in the mountain shelter.

I started gently, with a half-day hike through the verdant Orofero Valley. My guide, Herve Maraetaata, was armed with a machete, a bandana on his head, his body covered with intricate tattoos – the story of his life etched across his skin.

Tattoos were banned in 1819, along with dancing, music and the worship of Polynesian gods – those missionaries and settlers were a liberal bunch – however, many of the traditional customs have since been revived.

With his machete, Herve cut walking sticks to help me ford rivers as we tramped and slithered through this isolated valley, the slopes a tangle of thick vegetation, waterfalls rippling through the greenery. Hacking at sugar cane stalks for me to suck, he pointed out coffee bushes, once farmed here, as well as tomatoes, oranges, pineapples and chillis, before digging up a ginger root for me to taste. If you got lost here you could easily survive on fruit – although you might be attacked by wild boar, whose tracks Herve pointed out in the earth.

Hiking in the forest

As I scrabbled through the undergrowth he wove tales about his ancestors – the first settlers who arrived here from South-east Asia in large canoes, his grandmother who could diagnose and treat sickness using nature’s pharmacy.

He pointed out the giant roots of a Tree of Life (the banyan tree, or tumu ora in Tahitian) among which mummified bodies were once buried, and the kava plant, the roots of which, when chewed and mixed with saliva, produces a drink with a hallucinogenic effect that was once used in traditional rites. This is a Tahiti, not seen by the cruise ships docking in the capital, Papeete. They come for a whistlestop tour of the island’s colonial heritage and a grass-skirted, cocktail-laced show, ticking off the home of Mutiny on the Bounty author, James Norman Hall, before sailing on.

Hall’s low slung, green wooden house just outside Papeete, is worth a detour, however. Tahiti cast its spell over Hall, who, arriving here in the 1920s to write travel articles, fell in love with, and married a Tahitian woman. They went on to have three children, one of whom was Conrad Hall, the cinematographer who won Oscars for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, American Beauty and Road to Perdition and was nominated for six more. Both men are buried on the hillside behind the house looking out towards Point Venus and Matavai Bay, where Captain Cook observed the Transit of Venus in 1769 and the Bounty memorial marks the place where Captain Bligh dropped anchor in 1788.

Next stop was Moorea, a wind-whipped catamaran ride from Tahiti. Its jagged, mountainous interior delivers another adventure playground, with thundering waterfalls and cliffs to clamber. The island is less developed than Tahiti and home to just 18,000 people; a single road skirts its coast. I was staying at the Hilton Moorea, a string of thatched over-water bungalows spidering out over the lagoon, blacktip sharks circling each night below the walkways attracted by the lights of the resort. Happily, they skulk back beyond the reef during the day, leaving me to snorkel in the lagoon with a Disney-style array of tropical fish, try stand-up paddle-boarding, and helmet diving – walking along the sea bed among sting rays.

Back up on dry land, I made a beeline for Le Coco’s. The island’s first restaurant when it opened 30 years ago, it is now a local legend. In spring this year, the outpost on Moorea was launched, sleek and stone-clad and dishing up owners’ Thiery and Benedict Sauvage’s take on bistronomie – bistro style but with gastronomic flavours – and overseen by Thibault, the Frenchman with a low opinion of Bora Bora, but a high opinion of vanilla from Taha’a.

He recalled that when working at the Mandarin Oriental in Paris, he was once asked to make a pannacotta. The kitchen had Madagascan, Tahitian and Taha’an vanilla. He inhaled the scent from each before choosing – and using all of – the vanilla from Taha’a. The head chef almost fainted – it is the most expensive in the world, costing around €300 (£220) per kilo.

From Moorea, it’s a quick flight to Raiatea, 210km from Tahiti, and then a short boat trip across to Taha’a or “vanilla island” – a mere three kilometres away and the island with which it shares a lagoon. My base was Le Taha’a resort, on a tiny motu (islet). Arriving as the sun set, I sped towards an angry red sky, Bora Bora looming jagged and black on the horizon.

Le Taha’a is the only five-star resort outside Bora Bora other than The Brando. It’s very different in style, however, from Bora Bora’s honeymoon havens. It’s a wild, rather than polished, Polynesian resort.

I wanted to get a taste of the island’s prized produce and headed off to a vanilla plantation. There are just 6,000 people on Taha’a and 500 vanilla farms. The vanilla here has 14 notes – the strongest aroma is aniseed – because it is allowed to dry naturally for up to two weeks before being spread in the sun for a couple of hours and then in a sauna-style box to sweat. By contrast, vanilla from Madagascar has just nine notes.

The vanilla farm is more of a rustic smallholding, the vanilla laid out to dry on tables in a shed in a clearing surrounded by dense vegetation and other crops such as grapefruit and bananas. Handling the long black pods I could smell the heady sweetness. “It’s the second most expensive spice in the world after saffron,” said my guide as I handed over 3,500 Polynesian Francs (around £20) for a mere 100g. “Put a pod in an airtight container with a little rum or vodka in the bottom” was his parting tip.

Taha’s other claim to fame is black pearls. At the farm I visited, I was given a masterclass in cultured pearls (a small piece of grit or shell is placed in a black lip oyster to form the nucleus, then the oyster secretes nacre on the irritant, creating a lustrous pearl).

Jumping back on the boat, with a bag of vanilla pods and pearls, I motored home to my wild, thatched resort and an afternoon of beachcombing, snorkelling in the tepid turquoise water and lazing beneath a palm tree – anything but boring.

Original story;

http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/ausandpacific/tahitis-wild-side-more-than-a-honeymoon-hotspot-10478588.html?amp

 

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“History of French Polynesia”

“History of French Polynesia”

Image:  www.themilliardaire

French Polynesia is a paradise so beautifully seascaped with an abundance of healing minerals, it has become known as the islands of natural, geothermal spas.
“Volcanic peaks and coral reefs, the heady smell of tropical flowers carried on a soft breeze, island music and dancing into the night, pristine white beaches and warm waters . . .The Caribbean? No, I’m talking about the South Pacific, a place that’s how the Caribbean used to be 20, even 50, years ago before the beaches got crowded and when visitors were rare enough to be treated like VIPs. Tahiti, Bora Bora. The very words conjure jewels of islands scattered through an immense ocean, shimmering turquoise lagoons teeming with iridescent fish and smiling people with a dance that sways like the palm trees. Among the last inhabited places on the planet to be discovered by Europeans they were thought to be an earthly paradise.They still are – and their very remoteness promises to keep them pristine and secluded for years to come.”

http://spawellbeing.com/heaven-on-earth.html

 
 

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“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

Armando Rehia Dante Castagnoli was born in Tahiti to an Italian father and Tahitian mother. The third of seven children, his father was a strict taskmaster when it came to his children’s music, and “Mando” and his brothers would march several miles every Sunday playing their instruments before they got to play in the ocean with their friends. That early discipline paid off and Armando’s obvious gifts as a saxophone player and musician were encouraged by Professors from the Music Conservatory of Paris. When his family moved to Powell River B.CAfter graduation Mando moved to Toronto and studied at Humber College with world famous teacher, Pat LaBarbera, who played with Buddy Rich, Woody Herman and the legendary Elvin Jones. In 1984 Armando won the highest award at the BC WOODWIND FINALS.
Mando recorded his first CD, THE BUBBLEHEADS, at the age of 20 and for the next six years was active in the Toronto music scene playing Jazz, Blues, and R&B and becoming proficient at alto, tenor, and soprano saxophone as well as flute and percussion.

In the 90′s Armando acted as the musical director and featured soloist at the famous CLUB NEW ORLEANS in Papeete, Tahiti, and had the opportunity to work with greats like Nathan East, Jimmie Earl, Freddie Ravel, and many more. His collaboration with jazz singer, Chris Bennett, took him to Berlin, Germany and live recordings and guest appearances at the A-TRANE, one of the world’s great jazz clubs. His soldout appearances in Berlin and Los Angeles hi-lite Mando’s unique and beautiful tone, sometimes compared to Stan Getz, as well as his incredible showmanship.

With homebase in his island paradise of Tahiti, Mando now occasionally tours the world with stars such as Otmaro Ruiz, Felix Vilchez,Chris Bennett and more. He has recorded with the legendary Leon Ware and has produced and written several of his own CDs including DANCE FOR PLANET EARTH, now available at CD Baby and I-Tunes. The title cut, AORI NO TE FENUA, is the theme song for the TAHITI MUSIC FESTIVAL. Produced by Armando Castagnoli and Chris Bennett, the 2012 festival will raise awareness of how we can save our oceans and islands such as Tahiti and will bring musicians from all over the world together in unity and celebration.
http://armandocastagnoli.com/bio/


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Posted by on April 20, 2018 in jazz, music, pacific islands

 

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Two handsome Samoan athletes Cook”Outside the Ring – The “Usos cook a Samoan meal” – Episode 1″ 

 
 

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