RSS

Category Archives: pacific islands

“Ae A taua”  (How ’bout Us)  – Ben Vai




Born in Samoa. Raised mainly in Jamaica, now back in Samoa making beautiful music. Style of music, loves his reggae, ragga, but sings beautiful soul..awesome voice. Has two albums out, his own originals ‘LOST & FOUND’ and a samoan album “TAIMI O LE AFIAFI’. Currently in the studio recording 2 albums back to back. So looking forward to that. Out around end of Febuary 2010.

http://www.last.fm

How ’bout Us Lyrics
(Ooooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Oh-oh-oooh-hooo

(Oh-oh-oooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Ooooh, short and sweet

No sense in draggin’ on past our needs

Let’s don’t keep it hangin’ on

If the fire’s out

We should both be gone

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
(Some people can hold it together)

(Last) through all kinds of weather

Can we

(Oh-oh-oooh)

Oh-oh-oooh-hooo

(Oh-oh-oooh)

(Oh-oh-oooh)
Now don’t you get me wrong

(What you sayin’ to me, baby)

Cause I’m not tryin’ now

To end it all

(Let’s start something new)

It’s just that I have seen

(What have you seen)

Too many lover’s hearts lose their dream

(We won’t lose it)

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
(Some people can hold it together)

(Last) through all kinds of weather

Can we
(How ’bout us)

(How ’bout us, baby)

(How ’bout us)

(How about us, baby)

(How ’bout us)

(How ’bout us, baby)
Are we gonna make it, girl

Or are we gonna drift and drift and drift

Together again

Ooooh, love

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)

How ’bout us, baby
(Some people can hold it together)

Some people can hold it together

(Last) whoooa-ooh

How ’bout us

Some people

(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

Some people can love one another for life

(How ’bout us)

How ’bout us, baby
(Some people can hold it together)

Some people can hold it together

(Laaast through)

How ’bout us
How ’bout us, baby
(Some people are made for each other)

(Some people can love one another for life)

Some people can love one another for life

(How ’bout us)

You and me, baby

(Some people can hold it together)

Hold it together

(Laaast through)

Can we

Say that we can make it, baby
(Some people are made for each other)

Whoooa, yeah

(Some people can love one another for life)

(How ’bout us)
http://www.lyricsfreak.com

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 22, 2019 in music, other, pacific islands

 

Tags:

Fiji – Hey Girl

Fiji – Hey Girl

George “Fiji” Veikoso (born George Brooks Veikoso) is a Fijian classic reggae, Hip-Hop, R & B and Jazz vocalist, songwriter, music producer and occasional actor. He was born in Fiji but raised in Hawaii.[1

In 1998 he won the Na Hoku Hanohano Award for Male Vocalist of the year and Entertainer of the year.[3]

He has earned numerous other industry accolades and awards “Favorite Entertainer of the Year” and “People’s Choice Award”. FIJI’s collaboration on the “Island Warriors” compilation album earned a Grammy-nomination for Best Reggae Album.[4]

Fiji also co-wrote and sang the season 11 theme-song “Let Me Be the One”with Glenn Medeiros for the TV show, Baywatch and he has acted in the 2002, surfer film Blue Crush.[5]

He has produced and released many albums during his career such as “Evolution” and “Born and Raised” to name a few. One of his all time and most popular songs is “Lia”.[6]

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 14, 2019 in male vocalist, pacific islands

 

Tags:

“Royal Kikiriri – Authentic French and Polynesian …” 

image: dreamtime.com

 
 

A taste of France in Samoa: Le Petit Café 

Located near the well known Mailelani Samoa Skincare and Natural Beauty products factory at Papauta is a recently opened small homey café that promises to give you a taste of France in Samoa.

Le Petit Café offers French style breakfast served with a smile by a small team of beautiful young ladies whose bubbly attitude will leave customers in a good mood for the rest of the day.

The café which was officially opened on Friday is operated by Tailani Salanoa with family and friends being her pillars of support.

Le Petit is unique in a way that they are strict with serving only French style breakfast (not the traditional toast and eggs).

Motivated by her parent’s wishes to have a café along with their factory, Tailani used her interest in cooking and baking to fulfill both her and her parent’s dreams.


http://www.samoaobserver.ws/en/14_03_2016/local/3626/A-taste-of-France-in-Samoa-Le-Petit-Caf%C3%A9.htm

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 25, 2019 in brunch, pacific islands

 

Tags:

Darling ea na aoe~(darling only you and me)

By Alofa Tunoa Paise Team a beautiful song

Translated: darling only you and me

Tradtional Samoan Lyrics

who are those different words

you are my sweetheart

I know they refuse

come and say a word

darling you’re alone and me

it does not change your thoughts

I want to hear your voice

keep the friend close to you …

my dear ….

water is still running

to your will

for many days

darling you’re alone and me

it does not change my thoughts

I want to hear your voice

keep the friend tight

if I’m sorry

meet the wishes

 
2 Comments

Posted by on January 18, 2019 in music, pacific islands, reflections

 

Tags: ,

“Before the next teardrop falls – Makali”

Before the next teardrop falls – Makali”

Makali, is seemingly an obscure artist who sings this duo with Beix. In
Makali’s musical associations are 4 main references: Mark Tau, music, PNG, One Blood. Makali could be from Hawaii, New Guinea, Samoa or some other part of the Pacific Islands/South Pacific Islands. What a beautiful twist their island voices give to this nostalgic Country song in an English and Island dialect duo.

The song was written in 1967 and had been recorded more than two dozen times. The song had achieved modest success in versions by various performers; the original version by Duane Dee reached #44 on the Billboard country chart in early 1968, and Linda Martell sent her version to #33 in early 1970. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a version of the song on his 1969 album, Another Place Another Time.

In 1974, record producer Huey P. Meauxapproached Fender about overdubbing vocals for an instrumental track. Fender agreed, performing the song bilingual style — singing the first half of the song in English, then repeating that portion in Spanish.

“The recording only took a few minutes,” Fender once told an interviewer. “I was glad to get it over with and I thought that would be the last of it.”

However, “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” immediately took off in popularity when released to country radio in January 1975. The song ascended to #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in March, spending two weeks atop the chart. Thereafter, the song caught on just as strongly at Top 40 radio stations and it was not long before Fender had a #1 Billboard Hot 100 hit as well. Billboard ranked it as the No. 4 song for 1975.

The song is about a man’s undaunted determination to save his heart for the just-departed object of his deep (but unrequited) love, and sincere hope that should the woman’s new relationship not work out, she will remember his love and return to him. As originally composed, it is in thirty-two bar form (Fender’s bilingual recording stretches the piece to 48 bars).

A showcase of Fender’s tenor and Meaux’s Tex-Mex musical styling, “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” jump-started his career. (Fender’s career had stalled in 1960 after his arrest on drug charges.) In the months and years that followed, Fender recorded several bilingual standards which became major hits, most notably “Secret Love”.

BMI Songwriter Sterling Blythe claimed authorship and recalled having sold the rights to a portfolio of songs, among them “Before the Next Teardrop Falls”, for $4,500 to settle debts when he left Nashville for the West Coast prior to Fender’s recording.

Fender also has recorded a version fully in Spanish, entitled “Estare contigo cuando triste estas” (literally “I will be with you when you are sad”). The Spanish-language second verse in the English version, is the first verse of the fully Spanish version.

source

 
2 Comments

Posted by on December 31, 2018 in country music, music, pacific islands

 

Menu In The Sky – New Zealand (South Pacific)

How comfortable would you be, having an exquisite, delicious meal midair New Zealand?


“Dinner in the Sky is a hosted dining table, suspended at a height of 50 metres by a team of professionals”.


https://m.facebook.com/DinnerintheskyANZ/


New Zealand’s cuisine is largely driven by local ingredients and seasonal variations. An island nation with a primarily agricultural economy, New Zealand yields produce from land and sea. Similar to the cuisine of Australia, the cuisine of New Zealand is a diverse British-based cuisine, with Mediterranean and Pacific Rim influences as the country becomes more cosmopolitan.

Historical influences came from Māori cultureNew American cuisineSoutheast AsianEast Asian, and South Asian culinary traditions have become popular since the 1970s.

In New Zealand households, dinner is the main meal of the day, when families gather and share their evening together. Restaurants and takeaways provide an increasing proportion of the diet.

Māori cuisineEdit

hāngi dinner as served to tourists.

When the indigenous Māori arrived in New Zealand from tropical Polynesia they had a number of food plants, including kūmara (sweet potato), taro and . The plants grew well only in the north of the North Island. Native New Zealand plants such as fernroot became a more important part of the diet, along with insects such as the huhu grub. Problems with horticulture were made up for by an abundance of bird and marine life. The large flightless moa were soon hunted to extinction.[citation needed] Rāhui (resource restrictions) included forbidding the hunting of certain species in particular places or at certain times of year, so that the numbers could regenerate.

Preparation of a modern hāngi for tourists at Mitai Maori Village, Rotorua.

Like other Polynesian people, Māori cooked food in earth ovens, known in New Zealand as hāngi, although the word umu is also used[citation needed] as in other Pacific languages. Stones are heated by fire and food packed in leaves are placed on top. The packs are further covered with foliage and cloth, or, wet sacks, then earth. Other cooking methods included roasting and, in geothermal areas, boiling or steaming using natural hot springs and pools. Occasionally food would be boiled in non-geothermal areas by putting hot stones into a bowl with water and the food; and some food was also cooked over the open fire. Some foods were preserved using smoke, air-drying, or layers of fat—particularly muttonbirds. Māori were one of the few people to have no form of alcoholic beverage.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Dinner at Sky Tower, Auckland” 


Visit:

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: