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 “Dr. John: Right Place Wrong Time” 

Malcolm John “Mac” Rebennack (born November 21, 1940), better known by the stage name Dr. John, is an American singer, songwriter, voice actor, pianist, and guitarist, whose music combinesbluespopjazzzydecoboogie woogie, and rock and roll.[1]

Active as a session musician since the late 1950s, he gained a cult following in the late 1960s following the release of his album Gris-Gris and his appearance at the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music. He performed a wildly theatrical stage show inspired bymedicine showsMardi Gras costumes, and voodoo ceremonies. Rebennack has recorded more than 20 albums and in 1973 scored a top-20 hit with “Right Place Wrong Time”.

The winner of six Grammy Awards, Rebennack was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by singer John Legend on March 14, 2011.[2] In May 2013, Rebennack was the recipient of an honorary doctorate of fine arts fromTulane University. He was jokingly referred to by Tulane’s president, Scott Cowen, as “Dr. Dr. John”.[3]

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in music

 

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“Bob Marley No Women, No Cry” 

No Woman, No Cry” is a reggae song by Bob Marley and the Wailers. The song first became known in 1974 through the studio album Natty Dread. The live version from the 1975 album Live! was released as a single and is the best known version — it was included on the greatest hits compilation Legend and was recorded at the Lyceum Theatre in London on July 19, 1975 as part of hisNatty Dread Tour.

The live version of the song ranked No. 37 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in music, other

 

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 “Dennis Brown (Reggae Artist) – Here I Come” 

Wolves and Leopards is a 1977 reggae album by Dennis Brown Recorded between 1976 and 1977 and released on Brown’s own DEB label in the UK and on the Weed Beat label in Jamaica, the album comprises ten tracks originally released on singles that concentrate on cultural themes and mark the transformation of Brown from child star to full-fledged Rastaman.[1][2]Several of the tracks were produced by Winston “Niney” Holness, with two of the key tracks, “Wolf and Leopards” and “Here I Come”, co-produced by Lee “Scratch” Perry at his Black Ark studio, along with another track “In Zion”, which was omitted from the album. The rhythms for these had been recorded at Randy’s studio, and they were voiced and mixed at the Black Ark.[3] “Wolf and Leopards”, which criticizes criminals who posed as Rastafari as cover for their activities, was co-written by Brown, Holness and Perry (mostly by Perry according to Holness, and it was credited to Perry on its Observer Records single release),[3] “Here I Come” was, according to Holness, written by him when he was in his twenties, and Holness also sang harmony vocals on it.[3] The tracks on this album were among the last that Brown recorded with Holness before moving on to work with Joe Gibbs. The track was mixed byErrol Thompson. The remainder of the tracks were self-produced by Brown or by his DEB Music associate Castro Brown.[1] The album was described in Steve Barrow and Peter Dalton’s The Rough Guide to Reggae as “a benchmark album for the roots era”.[2]

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in music, other

 

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“Ub40 Red Red Wine”











UB40 is a British reggae/pop band formed in December 1978 in Birmingham, England. The band has had more than 50 singles in the UK Singles Chart, and has also achieved considerable international success. They have been nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album four times, and in 1984 were nominated for the Brit Award for Best British Group.[1] One of the world’s best-selling music artists, UB40 have sold over 70 million records.[2] The ethnic makeup of the band’s original line-up was diverse, with musicians of English, Scottish, Irish, Yemeni and Jamaican parentage.
Their hit singles include their debut “Food for Thought” and two US Billboard Hot 100 number ones with “Red Red Wine” and “Can’t Help Falling in Love”. Both of these also topped the UK Singles Chart, as did the band’s version of “I Got You Babe”.

The band’s lineup was stable for nearly 29 years, from March 1979 until January 2008, when frontman Ali Campbell left the band; followed shortly thereafter by keyboardist Mickey Virtue. Another member, Astro, remained with the band until November 2013; when he departed the original band to team up with Campbell and Virtue in a new version of UB40. In 2014, legal advice was sought by the original band (now consisting of remaining co-founding members drummer Jimmy Brown, guitarist Robin Campbell, bassist Earl Falconer, percussionist Norman Hassan, and saxophonist Brian Travers, along with new vocalist Duncan Campbell) against the group containing Campbell, Virtue, and Astro over usage of the band name, due to it being used by both parties.[3]

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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in male vocal group, music

 

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“THE BEACH BOYS – KOKOMO”

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“Kokomo” is a song written by John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, Mike Love, and Terry Melcher and recorded by American rock band the Beach Boys.
Its lyrics describe two lovers taking a trip to a relaxing place on an island off the Florida Keys called Kokomo. It was released as a single on July 18, 1988 by Elektra Records and became a No. 1 Hit in the United States, Japan, and Australia (where it topped for about two months). The single was released to coincide with the release of Roger Donaldson’s film Cocktail, and its subsequent soundtrack.

It was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television in 1988, but lost to Phil Collins’ “Two Hearts” (from the film Buster).[1] “Two Hearts” and Carly Simon’s “Let the River Run” from Working Girl jointly beat it for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song.

Composition and recording

The song was written by John Phillips and Scott McKenzie in Virginia Beach in 1986 and recorded and produced shortly after by Phillips, as a duet between McKenzie and Denny Doherty of the Mamas and the Papas. That version remained unreleased until 2010, when it appeared on a posthumous album of John Phillips’ songs called Many Mamas, Many Papas, most of which were originally-recorded in the 1980s for a reconstituted touring version of the Mamas and the Papas, featuring himself, Doherty, daughter Mackenzie Phillips and Spanky McFarlane of Spanky and Our Gang.

When the Beach Boys were commissioned to produce a theme song for Cocktail, producer Terry Melcher contacted his old friend, Phillips, and asked if he had any songs that might be suitable. “Kokomo” was one of the songs Phillips sent Melcher. Another was “Somewhere Near Japan” (aka “Fairytale Girl”), which would also be recorded by the Beach Boys for their Still Cruisin’ album.

Although Phillips had holidayed in the Caribbean several times on the island of Mustique, which was owned by his friend Colin Tennant, “Kokomo” itself is fictional. There are though several places in the world named Kokomo, including Kokomo, Indiana, Kokomo, Arkansas and Kokomo, Hawaii. The song describes Kokomo as a place “off the Florida Keys.”[2] The name was later used by resorts in Sandals Cay, Jamaica, and Grassy Key, Florida. The song also mentions many island locales: in order of their appearance in the song, Aruba, Jamaica, Bermuda, Bahama(s), Key Largo, Montego Bay, Martinique, Montserrat, and Port-au-Prince. Bermuda is the only place mentioned that is not located in or near the Caribbean Sea.

In addition to the Beach Boys’ signature layered-singing style, the song’s instrumentation makes heavy use of steel drums. According to “Kokomo” track sheet information supplied by engineer Keith Wechsler, the steel drums were played by musicians named Vince, Milton, and Mike (but not Mike Love). Wechsler also says that there is a percussionist by the name of Chili who played percussion in the introduction of the song. Van Dyke Parks, who had worked on some of the group’s earlier albums, played accordion, while session veteran Jim Keltner played drums.[3] Other players are Jeff Foskett (acoustic guitar), Rod Clark (bass), Joel Peskin (alto saxophone) and Ry Cooder (electric slide guitar).

On the Beach Boys demo of “Kokomo”, lead vocals were performed by Mike Love and Terry Melcher. The demo harmonies include Terry Melcher, Bruce Johnston, Mike Love, and Jeff Foskett. At Disney Films’ request, the “Kokomo” demo was “upgraded” to a master recording, thus requiring members of the Beach Boys to re-record the demo vocals, except for Mike Love’s lead.

The final recorded and released “Kokomo” background vocals are sung by Carl Wilson, Mike Love, Bruce Johnston, and Al Jardine. Terry Melcher’s and Jeff Foskett’s background vocals (on the demo) were erased and replaced by Carl Wilson’s and Al Jardine’s background vocals. The final released “Kokomo” lead vocals are sung by Mike Love and Carl Wilson. The only active Beach Boys member not involved with the recording was Brian Wilson, who was given short notice of the recording session and unable to attend.[citation needed] He was subsequently included in concert recordings of the song, including a live concert filmed for the television show Full House (episode 028).

Mike Love and Terry Melcher’s major contribution to the song was a re-write of Phillips and McKenzie’s existing chorus and the addition of the “Aruba, Jamaica…” lines. The Beach Boys version of the song also retained the melody of the Phillips and Mackenzie original. All four shared a co-write on the song.

There were previous songs referencing a Kokomo, including “Kokomo Blues” (1928) by Kokomo Arnold and “Kokomo me Baby” (1959) by Mississippi Fred McDowell, but these are believed to be in reference to Kokomo, Indiana.

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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in male vocal group, music

 

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“Caramel Macchiato Frappe” 

 

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2017 in music

 

“Stevie Wonder “Master Blaster”

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“Master Blaster (Jammin)” is a 1980 single by American singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder from his 1980 album Hotter than July.

The song, built on a heavy reggae feel, is an ode to reggae legend Bob Marley; Wonder had been performing live with Marley (billing him as an opening act) on his US tour in the fall of that year. Lyrics mention “children of Jah” and the end of the civil war in Zimbabwe.

The song was the leading single from Wonder’s Hotter than July album. It was a major hit, spending seven weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B singles chart, reaching number five on Billboard’s pop singles chart in the fall of 1980[1] and peaking at number two on the UK Singles chart. The song includes the line “hotter than July”, per the album title.

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