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 “Tequila” by the Champs

Tequila” is a 1958 Latin-flavored rock and roll instrumental recorded by the Champs. It is based on a Cuban mambo beat. The word “Tequila” is spoken three times throughout the tune. “Tequila” became a #1 hit on both the pop and R&B charts at the time of its release and continues to be strongly referenced in pop culture to this day.[1]

History

In 1957, Gene Autry’s record label, Challenge Records, signed Dave Burgess (born 1934), a rockabilly singer-songwriter from California who often recorded under the name “Dave Dupree”. At the end of 1957, having produced no hits, Challenge Records looked to Burgess, who organized a recording session on December 23 in Hollywood. In the studio that day were Burgess on rhythm guitar, Cliff Hills on bass guitar, the Flores Trio (Danny Flores on saxophone and keyboards, Gene Alden on drums, and lead guitarist Buddy Bruce), and Huelyn Duvall contributing backing vocals.[2] They gathered primarily to record “Train to Nowhere”, a song by Burgess, as well as “Night Beat” and “All Night Rock”.

The last tune recorded was “Tequila”, essentially just a jam by the Flores Trio. There were three takes, and Danny Flores, who wrote the song, was also the man who actually spoke the word “Tequila!”. Flores also played the trademark “dirty sax” solo.[3] The song served as the B-side for “Train to Nowhere”, which was released by Challenge Records on January 15, 1958. Duvall recalls that the record initially found little success, but, after a DJ in Cleveland played the B-side, “Tequila” skyrocketed up the charts, reaching #1 on the Billboard chart on March 28, 1958.

Daniel Flores had written “Tequila”, but, because he was signed to another label, the tune was credited to “Chuck Rio”, a name he adopted for the stage. Those present for the December 23 session began recording together again on January 20, 1958, under the name the Champs; the group technically formed after recording “Tequila”. The tune has been noted[by whom?] to have a similar rhythm structure to Bo Diddley’s 1958 release “Dearest Darling”.

Challenge Records was founded in Los Angeles in 1957 by cowboy singer Gene Autry and former Columbia Records A&R representative Joe Johnson. Autry’s involvement with the label was short lived as he sold his interest to the remaining partners in October 1958. The label’s first success came with instrumental group the Champs, who had their biggest hit in 1958 with “Tequila”. They also had a series of hits with pop singer Jerry Wallace (“Primrose Lane”) and country singer Wynn Stewart (“Wishful Thinking”). Other recording artists with the label included Jan and Dean, Gary Usher, the Knickerbockers, and singer-songwriter Jerry Fuller. The first Challenge label was blue with silver print, followed after the first half dozen releases by a short-lived light blue label with red print, then a maroon colored label with silver print. Finally around late 1959, the company issued their singles on a green label with silver print.
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Rupert Holmes – If You Like Pina Coladas

Rupert Holmes – If You Like Pina Coladas

February 24, 1947) is a British-American composer, singer-songwriter, musician, dramatist and author. He is widely known for the hit singles “Escape (The Piña Colada Song)” (1979) and “Him” (1980). He is also known for his musicals Drood, which earned him two Tony Awards, and Curtains, and for his television series Remember WENN.

Rupert

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Posted by on May 26, 2018 in music, rock

 

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“Copacabana (At the Copa)” 

“Copacabana (At the Copa)” 

The song was inspired by a conversation between Manilow and Sussman at the Copacabana Hotel in Rio de Janeiro, when they discussed whether there had ever been a song called “Copacabana”. After returning to the US, Manilow — who, in the 1960s, had been a regular visitor to the Copacabana nightclub in New York City — suggested that Sussman and Feldman write the lyrics to a story song for him. They did so, and Manilow supplied the music.

 

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“Cream – White Room

Cream is well noted as a 1960s British rock power trio consisting of drummer Ginger Baker, guitarist/singer Eric Clapton and lead singer/bassist Jack Bruce. The group’s third album, Wheels of Fire (1968), was the world’s first platinum-selling double album. The band is widely regarded as the world’s first successful supergroup. In their career, they sold more than 15 million copies of their albums worldwide. Their music included songs based on traditional blues such as “Crossroads” and “Spoonful“, and modern blues such as “Born Under a Bad Sign“, as well as more current material such as “Strange Brew“, “Tales of Brave Ulysses” and “Toad“.

The band’s biggest hits were “I Feel Free” (UK number 11), “Sunshine of Your Love” (US number 5), “White Room” (US number 6),”Crossroads” (US number 28), and “Badge” (UK number 18).

The band made a significant impact on the popular music of the time, and, along with Jimi Hendrix and other notable guitarists and bands, popularised the use of the wah-wah pedal. They provided a heavy yet technically proficient musical theme that foreshadowed and influenced the emergence of British bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath in the late 1960s and the early 1970s. They also influenced American southern rock groups the Allman Brothers Band and Lynyrd Skynyrd. The band’s live performances influenced progressive rockacts such as Rush.

The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993. They were included in both Rolling Stone and VH1’s lists of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time,” at number 67 and 61 respectively. They were also ranked number 16 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock

 
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Posted by on May 26, 2018 in music, rock, uk

 

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“MARGARITAVILLE”  JIMMY BUFFETT 

1977 Italian single picture sleeve

150px-margarita.jpg

A margarita cocktail: the inspiration for “Margaritaville”

“Margaritaville” is a 1977 song by American popular music singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett from the album Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes. This song was written about a drink Buffett discovered at Lung’s Cocina del Sur restaurant on Anderson Lane in Austin, Texas,[3] and the first huge surge of tourists who descended on Key West, Florida around that time. He wrote most of the song that night at a friend’s house in Austin, and finished it while spending time in Key West. In the United States “Margaritaville” reached number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and went to number one on the Easy Listening chart,[4] also peaking at #13 on the Hot Country Songs chart.[5] Billboard ranked it number 14 on its 1977 Pop Singles year-end chart.[6] It remains Buffett’s highest charting solo single.

Named for the cocktail margarita, with lyrics reflecting a laid-back lifestyle in a tropical climate, “Margaritaville” has come to define Buffett’s music and career. The relative importance of the song to Buffett’s career is referred to obliquely in a parenthetical plural in the title of a Buffett greatest hits compilation album, Songs You Know By Heart: Jimmy Buffett’s Greatest Hit(s). The name has been used in the title of other Buffett compilation albums such as Meet Me In Margaritaville: The Ultimate Collection and is also the name of several commercial products licensed by Buffett (see below). Popular culture references, throughout the years and remakes attest to the song’s continuing popularity. The song was mentioned in Blake Shelton’s 2004 single “Some Beach”.
“Margaritaville” has been inducted into the 2016 Grammy Hall of Fame for its cultural and historic significance.[7]

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Posted by on May 26, 2018 in male vocalist, music

 

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“Todd Rundgren – Hello It’s Me (1972)”

Todd Rundgren – Hello It’s Me (1972): https://youtu.be/lLeCB7Kn-VE

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Todd Harry Rundgren (born June 22, 1948) is an American multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and record producer. Hailed in the early stage of his career as a new pop star, supported by the certified gold solo double LP Something/Anything? in 1972,[2] his career has produced a diverse range of recordings, both as a solo artist and as a member of the band Utopia. He has also been prolific as a producer and engineer on the recorded work of other musicians.

During the 1970s and 1980s, Rundgren engineered and/or produced many notable albums for other acts, including Straight Up by Badfinger, Stage Fright by the Band, We’re an American Band by Grand Funk Railroad, Bat Out of Hell by Meat Loaf, New York Dolls by the New York Dolls, and Skylarking by XTC. In the 1980s and 1990s his interest in video and computers led to his “Time Heals” being the eighth video played on MTV, and “Change Myself” was animated by Rundgren on commercially available Amiga computers.

His best-known songs include “Hello It’s Me” and “I Saw the Light”, which have heavy rotation on classic rock radio stations, and “Bang the Drum All Day”, which is featured in many sports arenas, commercials, and movie trailers. Although lesser known, “Couldn’t I Just Tell You” has had a major influence on artists in the power pop musical genre.[4]

 

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“The Five Stairsteps-YOU’VE WAITED TOO LONG”


The Five Stairsteps, known as “The First Family of Soul,” [1] were an American Chicago soul group made up of five of Betty and Clarence Burke Sr.’s six children: Alohe Jean, Clarence Jr., James, Dennis, and Kenneth “Keni”, and briefly, Cubie. They are best known for the 1970 song “O-o-h Child”, listed #392 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

History

The Chicago group was dubbed “First Family of Soul” because of their successful five-year chart run; the moniker was later passed on to The Jackson 5.[1] Initially a teenage five-member brothers and sister vocal group made up of the children of Betty and Clarence Burke, The Five Stairsteps (named by Mrs. Burke who thought her kids looked like stairsteps when lined up according to their age) featured lead singer Clarence Jr., Alohe, James, Dennis, and 13-year-old Kenneth (“Keni”). Most of the members attended Harlan High School. Clarence Sr. was a detective for the Chicago Police Department. He backed the group on bass guitar, managed them, and co-wrote songs with Clarence Jr. and Gregory Fowler.


After winning first prize in a talent contest at the Regal Theater, The Five Stairsteps received recording contract offers. A close neighbor and family friend was Fred Cash of The Impressions, who introduced the group to Curtis Mayfield. Signed to Mayfield’s Windy City imprint, which was distributed by the Philadelphia based Cameo Parkway record label, their first single was Gregory Fowler’s ballad “You Waited Too Long” b/w “Don’t Waste Your Time,” a Mayfield song. A double-sided hit in Chicago, the A-side, “You Waited Too Long,” charted number 16 in the Billboard R&B chart in spring of 1966. Around the end of 1967, Cameo-Parkway folded and Windy City switched to Buddah Records through former Cameo-Parkway executive Neil Bogart, who joined the new label as co-president. The group’s second album, Family Portrait (complete with a montage of Burke family photos), was recorded and produced in Chicago by Clarence Jr. With the addition of their three-year-old brother, the group became The Five Stairsteps & Cubie. Family Portrait yielded two hit singles, “Something’s Missing” and a cover of Jimmy Charles and the Revelletts’ hit “A Million to One.”

 The group often toured with the Impressions. After signing with Buddah Records, the group was once again known as The Five Stairsteps.

In the spring of 1970, the group released their biggest hit, “O-o-h Child” (written by Stan Vincent), which hit number 14 R&B and number eight on the Billboard Hot 100. This disc sold over one million copies, and received a gold disc awarded by the R.I.A.A. on August 1970.[2] The flip side of the single, a cover of Lennon–McCartney’s “Dear Prudence,” charted at number 49 R&B. The following year, the group resurfaced as The Stairsteps with two charting Buddah singles: “Didn’t It Look So Easy” and “I Love You-Stop.”

 The group appeared in the 1970 movie The Isley Brothers Live At Yankee Stadium, a documentary of a benefit concert filmed at the famous home of the New York Yankees featuring The Isley Brothers, The Brooklyn Bridge and various other Buddah Records affiliated artists. In the early 1970s, the group was known simply as The Stairsteps. Alohe was still with the group. Cubie never really sang with the group, but would grow up to be a popular dancer with the Dance Theater of Harlem etc. Billy Preston introduced The Stairsteps to The Beatles, and the group signed with George Harrison’s Dark Horse label distributed by A&M Records. Alohe left the group in 1972 to begin a spiritual journey, and later would attend college, graduate and work at Emory University at which she was also a guest speaker. 

An album, Second Resurrection, was released in February 1976, produced by Preston, Robert Margouleff, and the Stairsteps. “From Us to You,” written by Clarence Jr. and Keni Burke, was the group’s biggest hit since “Ooh Child,” peaking at number ten R&B in early 1976. The follow-up single, “Pasado”, also covered by the group Pockets, received airplay in Chicago, New York, and other markets. Keni sang, played bass, and wrote both songs on the third single, “Tell Me Why” b/w “Salaam.” in January 2014, the album was reissued on cd in Europe by the Solaris label, as was Keni Burke’s eponymous Dark Horse album.

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Posted by on May 26, 2018 in black music artists, music

 

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