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Category Archives: 1970s

Good Morning!

Good Morning!

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How do you take a bite out of life? Feasting on a great breakfast… It is the most important meal of the day! And, don’t forget the coffee, it’s a booster… let it kick in! by Doro Dancer….

paradise cuisine
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:27:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:27:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, breakfast, brunch, coffee

 

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“Tony Orlando & Dawn – Knock Three Times”

Tony Orlando and Dawn is an American pop music group that was popular in the 1970s. Their signature hits include “Candida“, “Knock Three Times“, “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree“, “Say, Has Anybody Seen My Sweet Gypsy Rose“, and “He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You).

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:00:33+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:00:33 +0000 31, in 1970s, pop music, r&b

 

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“Steppenwolf – Magic Carpet Ride”

“Steppenwolf – Magic Carpet Ride”

Steppenwolf is a Canadian-American rock group that was prominent from 1968 to 1972. The group was formed in late 1961 in Toronto by vocalist John Kay, keyboardist Goldy McJohn and drummer Jerry Edmonton. Guitarist Michael Monarch and bassist Rushton Moreve were recruited by notices placed in LA area record stores and musical instrument stores. The essential core of Steppenwolf was John Kay, Jerry Edmonton and Goldy McJohn from The Sparrows (originally Jack London & the Sparrows from Oshawa, Ontario, Canada).[4]

Steppenwolfsold over 25 million records worldwide,[5] releasing eight gold albums and twelve Billboard Hot 100 singles, of which six were Top 40 hits,[6] including three Top 10 successes: “Born to Be Wild”, written by Dennis Edmonton, “Magic Carpet Ride”, and “Rock Me.” Steppenwolf enjoyed worldwide success from 1968 to 1972, but clashing personalities led to the end of the core lineup. Today, frontman John Kay is the only original member, having served as lead singer since 1967.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T09:35:09+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 09:35:09 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music, male vocal group

 

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“Herb Alpert This Guy’s in Love with You”

“This Guy’s in Love with You” is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and recorded by Herb Alpert. Although known primarily for his trumpet playing as the leader of the Tijuana Brass, Alpert sang lead vocals on this solo recording, arranged by Bacharach.

History

As documented in a Biography cable episode featuring Bacharach, the recording originated when Alpert asked Bacharach, “Say, Burt, do you happen to have any old compositions lying around that you and Hal never recorded; maybe one I might use?” Alpert said he made it his practice to ask songwriters that particular question; often a lost “pearl” was revealed. As it happened, Bacharach recalled one, found the lyrics and score sheet, and offered it to Alpert: “Here, Herb … you might like this one.”[citation needed]

Alpert saw the possibilities in it for himself. The composition had a recognizable Bacharach-David feel, a spot for a signature horn solo in the bridge and in the fadeout, and it was an easy song to sing within Alpert’s vocal range. He originally sang “This Guy’s in Love with You” on a 1968 television special, The Beat of the Brass. In response to numerous viewer telephone calls following the broadcast, Alpert decided that the song should be released as a single recording, and it reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in June of that year, remaining in the top position for four weeks. It was not only Alpert’s first No. 1 single, but it was also the first No. 1 single for his A&M record label. The song also spent ten weeks at No. 1 on the Easy Listening chart. For the single’s B-side, Alpert chose “A Quiet Tear,” an album track from his first album in 1962, The Lonely Bull.

Eleven years later Alpert became the first (and only) artist to have reached the prized No. 1 position of the Billboard Hot 100 with both a vocal performance and an instrumental performance when his instrumental, “Rise”, reached the top of the hit chart.

“This Guy’s in Love with You” was succeeded at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 by “Grazing In The Grass”, an instrumental by Hugh Masekela. On the Billboard Easy Listening chart, Alpert’s song was both preceded and succeeded at No. 1 by instrumental hits from Hugo Montenegro (“The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”) and Mason Williams (“Classical Gas”), respectively. Besides this hit in English, he recorded the song in Spanish and Italian.

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-05T09:29:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 05 Jan 2019 09:29:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, American music artists, ballad, entertainment, male vocalist

 

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“Dire Straits – Sultans Of Swing “

“Dire Straits – Sultans Of Swing “

“Sultans of Swing” is a song by British rock band Dire Straits from their eponymous debut album, which band frontman Mark Knopfler wrote and composed. Although it was first released in 1978, it was its 1979 re-release that caused it to become a hit in both the UK and U.S.

The song was recorded at Pathway Studios, North London, in July 1977 and quickly acquired a following after it was put on rotation at Radio London. Its popularity soon reached record executives, and Dire Straits were offered a contract with Phonogram Records. The song was then re-recorded in February 1978 at Basing Street Studios for the band’s debut album. The record company wanted a less-polished rock sound for the radio, so an alternative version was recorded at Pathway Studios in April 1978 and released as the single in some countries including the United Kingdom and Germany.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-04T10:03:51+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 04 Jan 2019 10:03:51 +0000 31, in 1970s, music, rock, uk

 

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“Average White Band – Cut The Cake Full LP 1975”

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Average White Band (also AWB) are a Scottish funk and R&B band that had a series of soul and disco hits between 1974 and 1980. They are best known for their million-selling instrumental track “Pick Up the Pieces”, and their albums AWB and Cut the Cake. The band name was initially proposed by Bonnie Bramlett. They have influenced others such as the Brand New Heavies, and been sampled by various musicians including the Beastie Boys, TLC, The Beatnuts, Too Short, Ice Cube, Eric B. & Rakim, Nas, and A Tribe Called Quest, as well as Arrested Development[1] – making them the fifteenth most sampled act in history.[2] As of 2012, forty years after their formation, they continue to perform.

Career

AWB was formed in early 1972[3] by Alan Gorrie,[4] and Malcolm “Molly” Duncan, with Onnie McIntyre,[5] Michael Rosen (trumpet), Roger Ball, and Robbie McIntosh[6] joining them in the original line-up. Hamish Stuart[7] quickly replaced Rosen. Duncan and Ball, affectionately known as the Dundee Horns, studied at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art (now part of the University of Dundee, but which at the time was part of the Dundee Institute of Art & Technology, now known as Abertay University), and were previously members of Mogul Thrash. Gorrie and McIntyre had been members of Forever More. McIntyre and McIntosh were used as session musicians on Chuck Berry’s recording of “My Ding-a-Ling”.[3]

The band’s breakthrough was a support slot at Eric Clapton’s comeback concert in 1973. MCA Records released their debut album, Show Your Hand (1973), which sold poorly.[8] Bruce McCaskill, who was Clapton’s tour manager, liked the band’s music and agreed to manage them. He borrowed money to take them to the US and to promote them. McCaskill had many contacts from his days with Clapton and managed to get Atlantic Records to sign them. The band relocated to Los Angeles and released the follow-up, AWB, better known as The White Album. It reached #1 and was the first of many with renowned producer Arif Mardin.[8]

McIntosh died of a heroin overdose at a Los Angeles party on 23 September 1974.[1][8] Gorrie also overdosed, but Cher kept him conscious until medical help arrived.[9] The NME reported in January 1975 that AWB played a benefit show for McIntosh’s widow at the Marquee Club in London.[10] McIntosh was replaced by Steve Ferrone (previously of Bloodstone), and, like McIntosh, previously with Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express.[1]

In 1975, the single “Pick Up the Pieces” – taken from the No. 1 AWB album – reached No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song knocked Linda Ronstadt’s “You’re No Good” out of No. 1 and sold over one million copies. It was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in March 1975.[11] It also prompted The J.B.’s, the backup band of the “Godfather of Soul”, James Brown, to record and release a song in reply, “Pick Up the Pieces, One by One”, under the name AABB (Above Average Black Band). It was both a tribute to AWB’s knowledge of funk and a tongue-in-cheek play on the Scottish band’s name.

AWB followed up with the LPs Cut the Cake (1975) and Soul Searching (1976), both big sellers and yielding further Top 40 singles. Cut the Cake was dedicated by the surviving band members to McIntosh’s memory. Their next LP, Benny & Us, was a collaboration with Ben E. King.[8]

After several more albums, AWB’s audience and sales dwindled. Their 1980 disco hit “Let’s Go Round Again” (UK #12),[12] was covered in the late 1990s by Louise. The group initially disbanded by 1983.

Ferrone went on to work with Duran Duran whilst Hamish Stuart joined Paul McCartney’s touring group.[8] In 1985 Gorrie released a solo album, Sleepless Nights.

Gorrie, McIntyre, and Ball reunited in 1989 to record Aftershock. Alex Ligertwood (ex-Santana and Jeff Beck Group) also appeared on this album replacing lead singer Hamish Stuart, along with Eliot Lewis who co-wrote with Gorrie and joined the band as well. Ligertwood left after the album’s recording and drummer Tiger McNeil joined for the reunited band’s live shows. McNeil was with the group until 1994. He was then succeeded by Peter Abbott (ex-Blood Sweat and Tears), who in turn was replaced by Fred “Catfish” Alias in September 1998. Drummer Adam Deitch did a two-year stint with AWB from 1999 to 2001.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T10:52:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 10:52:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music, male vocal group, r&b

 

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“J J Jackson – But It’s Alright”

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    Jackson first gained prominence while working at WBCN in Boston in the late 1960s, then at KLOS in Los Angeles for ten years. Jackson was one of the first DJs to introduce Americans to The Who and Led Zeppelin. He was a music reporter for KABC-TV when he was tapped as one of MTV’s original “fab five.” As a VJ, Jackson hosted the long awaited and much anticipated “unmasking” of KISS. He was one of the few African Americans to DJ an “album rock” radio station.

    After five years at MTV, Jackson returned to Los Angeles radio, first at KROQ-FM in 1987, then as program director of modern rock/alternative station KEDG (“The Edge”) until May 1989. He later returned to KLOS, and hosted the afternoon shift at smooth jazz station KTWV (“The Wave”) for one year.[1]

    Death

    Jackson suffered a heart attack and died on March 17, 2004, while driving home after dining with a friend in Los Angeles. He had a daughter and three grandchildren. He was 62.[2]

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    Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T10:19:32+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 10:19:32 +0000 31, in 1970s, coffee, entertainment, male vocalist

     

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