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Category Archives: 1970s

“NA NA HEY HEY KISS HIM GOODBYE”

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“Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye”

is a song written and recorded by Paul Leka, Gary DeCarlo and Dale Frashuer, attributed to a then-fictitious band they named “Steam”. It was released under the Mercury subsidiary label Fontana and became a number one pop single on the Billboard Hot 100 in late 1969, and remained on the charts in early 1970.[1] In 1977, Chicago White Sox organist Nancy Faust began playing the song when White Sox sluggers knocked out the opposing pitcher. The fans would sing and a sports ritual was born.The song’s chorus remains well-known, and is still frequently used as a crowd chant at many sporting events generally directed at the losing side in an elimination contest when the outcome is all but certain or when an individual player is ejected or disqualified.

Covers and subsequent popularity
The original recording of “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” has been released in many collections of oldies songs and recorded by other groups.

The Supremes included a cover of the song on their 1970 album New Ways but Love Stays.

Dave Clark & Friends released the song in October 1973 under the title “Sha-Na-Na-Na (Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye)” (EMI 2082),but the single didn’t chart.

In February 1983, UK girl group Bananarama released the song as a single from their album Deep Sea Skiving. This version became a top ten hit in the United Kingdom (#5), but only a minor hit in the US (Billboard #101) later that year.[citation needed]

In 1987, Canadian quartet The Nylons released an a cappella version of this song as a single under the shortened title “Kiss Him Goodbye”. It became their biggest hit on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number twelve that summer.[4] Nigerian Reggae artist Majek Fashek sampled the chorus for the song “Free Africa, Free Mandela”.

In 2009, Kristinia DeBarge heavily sampled “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” in her debut single “Goodbye.” The song would eventually reach the top 20 of the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #15.

In 2009, American rapper Wale sampled the chorus line of the song in his single Chillin. The song peaked at #99 on the US Billboard Hot 100.[5]

In 2014 the Norwegian artist Adelén used the chorus line of the song on her World Cup song “Olé.” The song was one of the tracks on the One Love, One Rhythm – The 2014 FIFA World Cup Official Album. The song peaked at number #3 in Norway.

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Posted by on March 16, 2019 in 1970s, male vocal group

 

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“Eric Clapton Layla Original”

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Eric Clapton Layla Original:

Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born 30 March 1945), is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time.[1] Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”[2] and fourth in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”.[3] He was also named number five in Time magazine’s list of “The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players” in 2009 [4]

In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately after leaving Mayall, Clapton joined Cream, a power trio with drummer Ginger Baker and bassist Jack Bruce in which Clapton played sustained blues improvisations and “arty, blues-based psychedelic pop”.[5] For most of the 1970s, Clapton’s output bore the influence of the mellow style of JJ Cale and the reggae of Bob Marley. His version of Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff” helped reggae reach a mass market.[6] Two of his most popular recordings were “Layla”, recorded while he was a member of band Derek and the Dominos; and Robert Johnson’s “Crossroads”, recorded by band Cream. Following the death of his son Conor in 1991, Clapton’s grief was expressed in the song “Tears in Heaven”, which featured in his Unplugged album.

Clapton has been the recipient of 18 Grammy Awards, and the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. In 2004, he was awarded a CBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music.[7][8][9] In 1998, Clapton, a recovering alcoholic and drug addict, founded the Crossroads Centre on Antigua, a medical facility for recovering substance abusers.[10]

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Posted by on March 11, 2019 in 1970s, classic music, male vocalist, r&b

 

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“Gerry Rafferty – Right Down the Line”

“Gerry Rafferty – Right Down the Line”

Right Down the Line” is a song written and recorded by Scottish singer-songwriter Gerry Rafferty. Released as a single in the summer of 1978, it reached #12 on the U.S. BillboardHot 100 and #8 on Cash Box. It was the second release from Rafferty’s City to City LP as the follow-up to his first major hit as a solo artist, “Baker Street”.

“Right Down the Line” was a bigger adult contemporary hit, spending four nonconsecutive weeks at number one in the U.S. In Canada, the song reached number five on both the pop singles and adult contemporary charts.

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Posted by on March 11, 2019 in 1970s, rock

 

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“Eric Clapton – Layla (acoustic)”

“Eric Clapton – Layla (acoustic)”

Layla” is a song written by Eric Claptonand Jim Gordon, originally released by their blues rock band Derek and the Dominos, as the thirteenth track from their only studio album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs (November 1970). Its contrasting movements were supposedly composed separately by Clapton and Gordon. The piano part has also been controversially credited toRita Coolidge, Gordon’s girlfriend at the time.

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Posted by on March 9, 2019 in 1970s, rock

 

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“Saturday Night Fever – John Travolta – Bee Gees”

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Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 American drama film directed by John Badham and starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a working-class young man who spends his weekends dancing and drinking at a local Brooklyn discothèque; Karen Lynn Gorney as Stephanie Mangano, his dance partner and eventual confidante; and Donna Pescow as Annette, Tony’s former dance partner and would-be girlfriend. While in the disco, Tony is the king. His circle of friends and weekend dancing help him to cope with the harsh realities of his life: a dead-end job, clashes with his unsupportive and squabbling parents, racial tensions in the local community, and his general restlessness.

A huge commercial success, the film significantly helped to popularize disco music around the world and made Travolta, already well known from his role on TV’s Welcome Back, Kotter, a household name. The Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, featuring disco songs by the Bee Gees, is one of the best-selling soundtracks of all time.[4]

The film showcased aspects of the music, the dancing, and the subculture surrounding the disco era: symphony-orchestrated melodies; haute couture styles of clothing; pre-AIDS sexual promiscuity; and graceful choreography.

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Posted by on March 4, 2019 in 1970s, classic music

 

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“THE HUSTLE” / Van McCoy / Dance / Perfume”

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Van Allen Clinton McCoy (January 6, 1940 – July 6, 1979)[1][2] professionally known as

Van McCoy.

was an American musician, record producer, arranger, songwriter, singer and orchestra conductor. He is known best for his 1975 internationally successful song

“The Hustle”

. He has approximately 700 song copyrights to his credit, and is also noted for producing songs for such recording artists as Gladys Knight & the Pips, The Stylistics, Aretha Franklin, Brenda & the Tabulations, David Ruffin, Peaches & Herb and Stacy Lattisaw.[1]

Biography
Van McCoy was born in Washington, D.C.,[1] the second child of Norman S. McCoy, Sr. and Lillian Ray.[3] He learned to play piano at a young age and sang with the Metropolitan Baptist Church choir as a youngster.

By the age of 12, he had begun writing his own songs, in addition to performing in local amateur shows alongside his older brother, Norman Jr. The two brothers formed a doo-wop combo named the Starlighters with two friends while in Roosevelt High School. In 1956 they recorded a single entitled, “The Birdland”,[1] a novelty dance record. It gained some interest, resulting in a tour with drummer Vi Burnsides. In 1959 the Starlighters produced three singles for End Records that included “I Cried”. Marriage and other commitments eventually caused the group to disband during the mid-1950s. Van also sang with a group called the Marylanders.

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During 1961, McCoy met Kendra Spotswood (a.k.a. Sandi Sheldon) who lived near his family. For the next five years, they sang and recorded music together professionally. Their relationship ended when McCoy delayed their wedding plans, because of a work contract he had signed with Columbia Records.[3]

Career
McCoy entered Howard University to study psychology during September 1958, but dropped out after two years to relocate to Philadelphia, where he formed his own recording company, Rockin’ Records, releasing his first single, “Hey Mr. DJ”, during 1959. This single gained the attention of Scepter Records owner Florence Greenberg, who hired McCoy as a staff writer and A&R representative for the label. As a writer there, McCoy composed his first success, “Stop the Music”, for the popular female vocal group, the Shirelles during 1962. He was co-owner of Vando Records with Philly D.J, Jocko Henderson. He owned Share label and co-owned the Maxx label during the mid-1960s, supervising such artists as Gladys Knight & The Pips, Chris Bartley and The Ad Libs.

He really came into his own after first working for top producers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller as a writer and then signing with the major April-Blackwood music publishing concern, connected with Columbia Records. McCoy went on to write a string of hits as the 1960s progressed. He penned “Giving Up” for Gladys Knight & the Pips (later a hit for Donny Hathaway), “The Sweetest Thing This Side of Heaven” for Chris Bartley, “When You’re Young and in Love” for Ruby & the Romantics, “Right on the Tip of My Tongue” for Brenda & the Tabulations, “Baby I’m Yours” for Barbara Lewis, “Getting Mighty Crowded” for Betty Everett, “Abracadabra” for Erma Franklin, “You’re Gonna Make Me Love You” for Sandi Sheldon and “I Get the Sweetest Feeling” for Jackie Wilson. He also put together the hit-making duo of Peaches & Herb, arranging and co-producing their first hit, “Let’s Fall in Love”, for the Columbia subsidiary, Date in 1966. The same year, McCoy recorded a solo LP for Columbia titled Night Time Is a Lonely Time, and, a year later, started his own short-lived label, Vando, as well as his own production company VMP (

Van McCoy

Productions).

Van wrote or produced most consistently for The Presidents (“5-10-15-20 (25 Years of Love)”), The Choice Four (“The Finger Pointers”, “Come Down to Earth”), Faith, Hope & Charity (“To Each His Own” and “So Much Love”) and David Ruffin (“Walk Away from Love”). His song “Giving Up” was a 1969 hit for The Ad Libs.[4] In the early 1970s, McCoy began a long, acclaimed collaboration with songwriter/ producer, Charles Kipps, and arranged several hits for the soul group The Stylistics as well as releasing his own solo LP on the Buddha label, Soul Improvisations, in 1972. The album included a minor hit, “Let Me Down Easy”, but it was not a success following poor promotion. He formed his own orchestra, Soul City Symphony[1] and, with singers Faith, Hope and Charity, produced several albums and gave many performances.

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Posted by on March 2, 2019 in 1970s, coffee

 

“Brook Benton – Rainy Night in Georgia” 

“Brook Benton – Rainy Night in Georgia” 

“Rainy Night in Georgia” is a song written by Tony Joe White in 1962 and popularized by R&B vocalist Brook Benton in 1970.

In a January 17, 2014 interview with music journalist Ray Shasho, Tony Joe White explained the thought process behind the making of ”

Rainy Night in Georgia ” and “Polk Salad Annie”.

When I got out of high school I went to Marietta, Georgia, I had a sister living there. I went down there to get a job and I was playing guitar too at the house and stuff. I drove a dump truck for the highway department and when it would rain you didn’t have to go to work. You could stay home and play your guitar and hangout all night. So those thoughts came back to me when I moved on to Texas about three months later. I heard “Ode to Billie Joe” on the radio and I thought, man, how real, because I am Billie Joe, I know that life. I’ve been in the cotton fields. So I thought if I ever tried to write, I’m going to write about something I know about. At that time I was doing a lot of Elvis and John Lee Hooker onstage with my drummer. No original songs and I hadn’t really thought about it. But after I heard Bobbie Gentry I sat down and thought … well I know about Polk because I had ate a bunch of it and I knew about rainy nights because I spent a lot of rainy nights in Marietta, Georgia. So I was real lucky with my first tries to write something that was not only real and hit pretty close to the bone, but lasted that long. So it was kind of a guide for me then on through life to always try to write what I know about.

In 1969, after several years without a major hit, Benton had signed to a new record label, Cotillion Records (a subsidiary of Atlantic Records). Brought to the attention of producer Jerry Wexler, Benton recorded the song in November 1969 with producer Arif Mardin session personnel present on the hit record included Billy Carter on Organ, Dave Crawford on piano, Cornell Dupree and Jimmy O’Rourke on guitar, Harold Cowart on bass, Tubby Ziegler on drums, and Toots Thielmans on harmonica.

Taken from his “come-back” album

Brook Benton

Today, the melancholy song became an instant hit. In the spring of 1970, the song had topped the Billboard Best Selling Soul Singles chart. It also reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100,[1] and number two on the Adult Contemporary chart. In Canada, the song made #2 on the RPM Magazine Hot Singles chart.

The RIAA certified the single gold for sales of one million copies. In 2004, it was ranked #498 on the List of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

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