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Category Archives: 1970s

CHICAGO – OLD DAYS (1975)

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“Old Days” is a song written by James Pankow for the group Chicago and recorded for their album Chicago VIII (1975), with lead vocals by Peter Cetera.[1] The second single released from that album, it reached #5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the Easy Listening chart.[2]

Pankow has said that the song is a nostalgic piece about his childhood:

“It touches on key phrases that, although they date me, are pretty right-on in terms of images of my childhood. ‘The Howdy Doody Show’ on television and collecting baseball cards and comic books.” [3]
Cetera apparently hated singing the song in concert,[citation needed] as the Howdy Doody show was his least favorite show during his childhood.

The song is still popular at Chicago concerts, with Jason Scheff or Keith Howland now singing the lead vocal. The Sopranos star Vincent Curatola has been known to guest vocal with the band on the song as well.[citation needed]

“Old Days” is featured on the soundtrack of the movie Starsky & Hutch (2004). The band also reworked the song in 2009 to serve as the theme for the “Monsters in the Morning” show airing on Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

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“Cherokee People ~ Paul Revere And The Raiders” 

“Cherokee People ~ Paul Revere And The Raiders” 

“Cherokee People ~ Paul Revere And The Raiders”

Indian Reservation (The Lament of the Cherokee Reservation Indian)” is a songwritten by John D. Loudermilk.[1] The song was first recorded by Marvin Rainwater in 1959 and released on MGMas “The Pale Faced Indian”, but that release stayed unnoticed. The first hitversion was a 1968 cover by Don Fardon—a former member of The Sorrows—that reached number 20 on the BillboardHot 100[2] and number 3 on the UK Singles Chart.[3]

In 1971, The Raiders recorded the song on the Columbia Records label, and it topped the Hot 100 on July 24.[4]Raiders lead singer Mark Lindsay is part Cherokee. On 30 June 1971 the RIAAgold certified the record for selling over a million copies.[5] The record was later certified platinum for selling an additional million copies.[5] The song was the group’s only Hot 100 number 1 hit and their final Hot 100 top twenty song.


 
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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in 1970s, rock

 

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“Cat Stevens – Moon Shadow (1970)”

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“Moonshadow” is a song from the album Teaser and the Firecat, released by Cat Stevens in 1971. Stevens, who is now known as Yusuf Islam, considers this his favourite of his old songs. It is one of the songs that convinced him to release a Greatest Hits record of his work as Cat Stevens. He felt its uplifting message could help people.[1]

When Yusuf appeared on The Chris Isaak Hour in 2009, he said of this song: “I was on a holiday in Spain. I was a kid from the West End (of London) – bright lights, et cetera. I never got to see the moon on its own in the dark, there were always streetlamps. So there I was on the edge of the water on a beautiful night with the moon glowing, and suddenly I looked down and saw my shadow. I thought that was so cool, I’d never seen it before.”

An animated short featuring the song was part of the Fantastic Animation Festival feature film released in 1977.[2] The animation begins with a still frame of Teaser and his pet Firecat, pictured as they appear on the cover of the album bearing their names. The picture comes to life, and in the course of the animation, they find the fallen Moon, ride on it as it flies, and find a way to replace it in the sky. The beginning and ending story portions were written by Cat Stevens and narrated by Spike Milligan.[2] The video also appears as a special feature on the Majikat Concert DVD.[3]

In May 2012, Moonshadow, a new musical by Yusuf, featuring music from throughout his career, opened at the Princess Theatre in Melbourne, Australia. The show received mixed reviews and closed four weeks early.[4][5]

The song appears as “Moon Shadow” on both the UK and US labels of the single release.

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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in 1970s, male vocalist

 

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“AT LAST” + Lyrics ETTA JAMES – Original Version:

“AT LAST” + Lyrics ETTA JAMES – Original Version:

“AT LAST” + Lyrics ETTA JAMES – Original Version:

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Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins; January 25, 1938 – January 20, 2012) was an American singer. Her style spanned a variety of music genres including blues, R&B, soul, rock and roll, jazz and gospel. Starting her career in 1954, she gained fame with hits such as “The Wallflower”, “At Last”, “Tell Mama”, “Something’s Got a Hold on Me”, and “I’d Rather Go Blind” for which she wrote the lyrics. She faced a number of personal problems, including drug addiction, before making a musical resurgence in the late 1980s with the album Seven Year Itch.

James is regarded as having bridged the gap between rhythm and blues and rock and roll, and was the winner of six Grammys and 17 Blues Music Awards. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, the Blues Hall of Fame in 2001, and the Grammy Hall of Fame in both 1999 and 2008. Rolling Stone ranked James number 22 on their list of the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time and number 62 on the list of the 100 Greatest Artists.

 

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“THE ESQUIRES – GET ON UP”

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The Esquires were an American R&B group from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, principally active from 1957 to 1976.

History

The group first formed in 1957 around the Moorer family: Gilbert (born Gilbert Moorer, Jr., August 20, 1941, Birmingham, Alabama, died August 28, 2008),[1] his brother Alvis (born Alvis V. Moorer, January 18, 1940, Birmingham, Alabama, died August 21, 2011), and their sister Betty. They first performed as Betty Moorer and the Esquires. When their sister and lead singer left, the group shortened its name to The Esquires, and Gilbert became lead singer.[2] In 1961, Sam Pace (born Sammie L. Pace, September 22, 1944, Kansas City, Missouri, died January 7, 2013) joined as a tenor.[3] They went through many lineup changes over their first decade, which saw them aiming mostly for local recognition. In 1966 they moved to Chicago and auditioned for Curtis Mayfield, who was not interested in signing them.[4] They then attempted to sign with Constellation Records, but the record label went under at the end of 1966; they signed instead with Bunky Records, Constellation’s successor. Bunky was distributed by Scepter Records on the national level.

Their debut record for Bunky/Scepter was “Get on Up”, (1967) which became a major hit in the United States, peaking at #11 as a pop single but reaching #3 on the R&B charts. Following the release they played Chicago’s Regal Theater and the Apollo Theatre in New York City. Further singles were also successes, and the group released one full-length LP. After five singles on Bunky the group signed a deal with Scepter themselves late in 1968. They later returned to Bunky and then, in 1970, signed with Capitol Records for one single (“Reach Out”) and Lamarr Records in 1971 for “Girls in the City”.

Gilbert Moorer died from throat cancer on August 28, 2008, at the age of 67.[2]

Alvis Moorer died on August 21, 2011 at the age of 71.

Sam Pace died after a long illness on January 7, 2013 at the age of 68.[3]

Edwards, who lives in Chicago, is now the only surviving member of the band from its recording days.[3]

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PUT ON YOUR HI-HEEL SNEAKERS – Tommy Tucker

PUT ON YOUR HI-HEEL SNEAKERS – Tommy Tucker

“Hi-Heel Sneakers” (often also spelled “High Heel Sneakers”) is a blues song recorded by Tommy Tucker in 1963. The song, an uptempo twelve-bar blues, “has a spare, lilting musical framework” with a strong vocal.[1] Tommy Tucker’s original recording hit number one on the Cash Box R&B Locations chart and number eleven on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] Musicians on the recording included Brenda Jones on bass, Johnny Williams on drums, Weldon Young on guitar, and Robert Higggenbotham on piano and organ.

Over 1000 artists have recorded “Hi-Heel Sneakers”. These include Bill Haley & His Comets, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Ronnie Milsap, The Faces, Sting, Led Zeppelin, Carl Perkins (featured on Johnny Cash’s 35th Anniversary album), Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, Chuck Berry, Stevie Wonder, Paul McCartney, The Searchers (It’s The Searchers album), The McCoys (Hang on Sloopy album), Sammy Davis Jr., Big Brother and the Holding Company,[3] Jose Feliciano, Buddy Guy & Junior Wells, Tom Jones, John Lee Hooker, The American Breed, Cleo Laine, Pharoah Sanders, Jerry Garcia and The Grateful Dead, Phish, Ramsey Lewis, Laura Nyro and George Thorogood. Tucker’s version also features on the John Lennon’s Jukebox LP.

The song, which Tucker penned, has appeared in several soundtracks, for example The Who’s Quadrophenia (1979); the HBO special The Promiseland; motion pictures, e.g. Lion of Africa, Lackawanna Blues, Frankie’s House; commercial jingles and television shows such as Late Night with David Letterman, sitcoms Rags to Riches, Redd Foxx Show; plus at sporting events such as the women’s 1997 NCAA Basketball Championship. In England there is a racehorse named High Heel Sneakers, plus in the Netherlands a musical group uses the name.

The opening line “Put on your red dress, mama—’cause you’re going out tonight” was used in a TV commercial for Fresh Start laundry detergent in the mid-1980s. The commercial’s message was that a woman could be told in the afternoon that she’s going out that night and by using the detergent, her dress would be clean well in time for her night out.

The Oasis song “Get Off Your High Horse Lady”, from the album Dig Out Your Soul, uses the vocal melody and layout of this song.

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Posted by on October 14, 2017 in 1970s, black music artists, r&b

 

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Colour My World – by Chicago

Colour My World – by Chicago

“Colour My World”is a song written by American musician James Pankow, one of the founding members of the rock/jazz fusion band Chicago. Part of Pankow’s “Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon” song cycle/suite, it was recorded for their second album Chicago, also called Chicago II (1970). Terry Kath sings the lead vocal, and Walter Parazaider performs the highly recognizable flute solo.
The song was brought to Acuff-Rose Music in Nashville as a simple five-chord song with lyric line. A&R tech Earl Knosher then expanded and arranged the progression, adding the colorful major 7th and 9th chords that make the song so unique. In fact, the major seventh chord that begins the song has been called, “the most famous major seventh chord in the history of music.”[1] Knosher also arranged the flute solo and played piano on the first demo of the song.

The song was initially released as the B-side to “Make Me Smile” in March 1970. It was re-released in June 1971 as the B-side to the re-release of “Beginnings”; this second single reached #7 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

“Colour My World” became a popular “slow-dance” song at high school proms and university dances during the 1970s.

Chicago continues to perform the song, either on its own, or as part of the Ballet. Since Kath’s death in 1978 and being brought back into their set list in 1982, lead vocals were performed by Bill Champlin until 1991, when Robert Lamm took the lead. It has been sung by trumpeter Lee Loughnane since 2009.

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