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Category Archives: 1970s

“Air Supply – All Out Of Love (Lyrics)”

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Air Supply is an Australian soft rock duo, consisting of British-born singer-songwriter and guitarist Graham Russell and lead vocalist Russell Hitchcock. They had a succession of hits worldwide, including eight Top Ten hits in the United States, in the early 1980s. They formed in Australia in 1975 and have included various accompanying musicians and singers. On 24 October 2013 the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) announced that Air Supply were to be inducted into their Hall of Fame on 1 December at the same ceremony as the annual ARIA Awards. On January 1, 2015, Air Supply marks on its 40th Anniversary.

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“CRYSTAL GAYLE – YOU’VE BEEN TALKING IN YOUR SLEEP”

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“Talking in Your Sleep” is a song written by Roger Cook and Bobby Wood, and recorded by American country music artist Crystal Gayle. It was released in January 1978 as the first single from the album When I Dream. The song became a hit on both the country and pop charts in 1978. It peaked at number one on the US Country chart,[2] number eighteen on the US Pop chart and number three at the US Adult Contemporary chart.

In 1977, Gayle achieved international crossover Pop success for the first time with her No. 1 hit “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue”. Following the song’s success, Gayle was recording more Pop and Adult Contemporary-styled Country tunes. This song is one of the first examples of this. “Talking in Your Sleep” was released in early 1978, and was a hit mid-year. The song proved an instant follow-up for Gayle on the Pop charts, being she hadn’t had another Top 40 Pop hit since “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue” the previous year.

“Talking in Your Sleep” was released on Gayle’s major-selling album from that year called When I Dream. Following “Talking in Your Sleep”‘s success as a crossover smash, Gayle only achieved one more Top 40 Pop hit as a solo artist, which came the next year with the song, “Half the Way”.

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“Born To Be Wild – Steppenwolf”

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“Born to Be Wild” is a song first performed by the band Steppenwolf, written by Mars Bonfire. The song is often invoked in both popular and counter culture to denote a biker appearance or attitude. It is sometimes described as the first heavy metal song, and the second verse lyric “heavy metal thunder” marks the first use of this term in rock music (although not as a description of a musical style).[6]

Composition

“Born to Be Wild” was written by Mars Bonfire (who also wrote several other songs for Steppenwolf) as a ballad.[7] Bonfire was previously a member of the Sparrows, the predecessor band to Steppenwolf, and his brother was Steppenwolf’s drummer. Although he initially offered the song to other bands — The Human Expression, for one[8] — “Born to Be Wild” was first recorded by Steppenwolf in a sped-up and rearranged version that AllMusic’s Hal Horowitz described as “a roaring anthem of turbo-charged riff rock” and “a timeless radio classic as well as a slice of ’60s revolt that at once defines Steppenwolf’s sound and provided them with their shot at AM immortality.”[7]

Release and reception

“Born to Be Wild” was the band’s third single off their 1968 debut album Steppenwolf and became their most successful single, reaching No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles charts. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine placed “Born to Be Wild” at No. 129 on the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list.[9] Also in 2004, it finished at #29 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema. In 2009, it was named the 53rd best hard rock song of all time by VH1.[10]

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Posted by on May 16, 2017 in 1970s

 

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“Peg” – Steeley Dan

“Peg” – Steeley Dan

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“Peg” is a song by American rock group, Steely Dan, first released on the band’s 1977 album titled Aja. The track was released as single in 1977 and reached number 11 on the US Billboard chart in 1978 and number eight on the Cash Box chart.[2] In Canada, “Peg” spent three weeks at number seven during March 1978.[3]Like many of their songs, it is a blend of rock, jazz and R&B; the song also incorporates disco into this blend. The song’s guitar solo was attempted by seven top studio session guitarists ‒ including Robben Ford and recurring guitarist Larry Carlton (who wrote Room 335 because of the solo played by Graydon)[4]‒ before Jay Graydon’s version became the “keeper”.[5] He worked on the song for about six hours before the band was satisfied.[6]

Michael McDonald can be heard providing multi-tracked backup vocals in the choruses, and keyboardist Paul Griffin can also be heard improvising background vocals in the final chorus and fadeout.[5]

“Peg” was heavily sampled on the 1989 De La Soul song, “Eye Know”. In 2007, the song was covered by Nerina Pallot.

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“Steppenwolf – Magic Carpet Ride”

“Steppenwolf – Magic Carpet Ride”

Steppenwolf is a Canadian-American rock group that was prominent from 1968 to 1972. The group was formed in late 1961 in Toronto by vocalist John Kay, keyboardist Goldy McJohn and drummer Jerry Edmonton. Guitarist Michael Monarch and bassist Rushton Moreve were recruited by notices placed in LA area record stores and musical instrument stores. The essential core of Steppenwolf was John Kay, Jerry Edmonton and Goldy McJohn from The Sparrows (originally Jack London & the Sparrows from Oshawa, Ontario, Canada).[4]

Steppenwolfsold over 25 million records worldwide,[5] releasing eight gold albums and twelve Billboard Hot 100 singles, of which six were Top 40 hits,[6] including three Top 10 successes: “Born to Be Wild”, written by Dennis Edmonton, “Magic Carpet Ride”, and “Rock Me.” Steppenwolf enjoyed worldwide success from 1968 to 1972, but clashing personalities led to the end of the core lineup. Today, frontman John Kay is the only original member, having served as lead singer since 1967.

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THE ELGINS – HEAVEN MUST HAVE SENT YOU

THE ELGINS – HEAVEN MUST HAVE SENT YOU


“Heaven Must Have Sent You” is a song written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Eddie Holland when at Motown, and first recorded by The Elgins in 1966. It was also a 1979 disco hit single by Bonnie Pointer.

The Elgins

The version by the Elgins, released on the Motown subsidiary V.I.P. Records label in 1966, reached no. 9 on the Billboard R&B chart and no. 50 on the US Billboard Hot 100. Popular on the Northern soul scene in the UK it was reissued in 1971, and reached no. 3 on the UK Singles Chart.[1][2][3] The Elgins’ backing vocals were augmented by The Andantes.

“Heaven Must Have Sent You”

was one of two remakes of Motown hits recorded by Bonnie Pointer for her 1978 self-titled solo debut album which was released by Motown: Pointer would state: “”I wanted to cut that tune and the other old Motown tune: ‘When I’m Gone’, simply because I’ve always dug them.”[5] Pointer has stated that she suggested to Berry Gordy that he have her remake “Heaven Must Have Sent You” as a disco track after Pointer had heard the Village People hit “Y.M.C.A.” and realized that “Heaven Must Have Sent You” would work well with an arrangement similar to that of “Y.M.C.A”.[6]

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“Phil Collins Another Day In Paradise Lyrics”

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“Another Day in Paradise” is a protest song recorded by English drummer and singer Phil Collins. Produced by Collins along with Hugh Padgham, it was released as the first single from his number-one album …But Seriously (1989). As with his song for Genesis, “Man on the Corner”, the track has as its subject the problem of homelessness;[1] as such, the song was a substantial departure from the dance-pop music of his previous album, No Jacket Required (1985).

Collins sings the song from a third-person perspective, observing as a man crosses the street to ignore a homeless woman, and he implores listeners not to turn a blind eye to homelessness because, by drawing a religious allusion, “it’s just another day for you and me in paradise”. Collins also appeals directly to God by singing: “Oh Lord, is there nothing more anybody can do? Oh Lord, there must be something you can say?”

The song was a No. 1 worldwide, and eventually became one of the most successful songs of his solo career. It won Collins and Padgham the Grammy Award for Record of the Year at the 1991 awards ceremony, while it was also nominated for Song of the Year, Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male and Best Music Video, Short Form. “Another Day in Paradise” also won an award for Best British Single at the 1990 BRIT Awards. Despite the awards gained following its release, the song has received a largely negative reaction from music critics. In the U.S., it was the final number-one single of the 1980s on the Billboard Hot 100, and the first (and Collins’ only) of the 1990s.

Collins and David Crosby’s live performance of the song at the 1991 Grammy Awards was released on the 1994 album Grammy’s Greatest Moments Volume I.[2] In 2009, Collins’s version was listed at 86th on Billboard ’​s Greatest Songs of All Time.[3] “Another Day in Paradise” has since been covered by several artists, including Brandy, and her brother Ray J, Jam Tronik, Axxis, Novecento, and Hank Marvin.

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