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Category Archives: 1960s

“Deon Jackson – Love Makes The World Go Around”

Deon Jackson (January 26, 1946 – April 18, 2014), was an American soul singer and songwriter.

Jackson was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He performed in vocal groups and as a soloist while he attended Ann Arbor High School, and was signed by producer Ollie McLaughlin while still in school. His first single was his own “You Said You Love Me”, followed by “Come Back Home”; both were regional hits in his native Michigan.

Jackson toured heavily on the local club circuit before releasing his next record, 1966’s “Love Makes the World Go Round” on Carla Records. The tune became a major pop hit, and a full-length album was released subsequently on Atco Records. Jackson had two more successful singles and recorded until the end of the decade, but then faded from view, living and performing in the Chicago area. He is referred to as a “one hit wonder”. This isn’t the case in the UK where he is very well known and respected on the underground Northern Soul scene where Deon’s records and his unissued recordings are still played to this day to fanatical Soul loving Brits at allnighters across the UK.

After having a brain hemorrhage at his home, Jackson died at the Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights, Illinois, on April 18, 2014, at the age of 68.

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Posted by on November 18, 2017 in 1960s, male vocalist

 

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Maria MULDAUR – (bluegrass) Don’t You Feel My Leg

Maria MULDAUR – (bluegrass) Don’t You Feel My Leg

From her early 1960s jug band recordings to the present day, Maria Muldaur stands unique in her ability to transcend categorization. For over forty years, Muldaur has shared her deep love of roots music. By carefully selecting her repertoire from the best North American songwriters, she has encompassed the blues of the Mississippi Delta, New Orleans gospel and jazz, Western Swing, Appalachian bluegrass/country and everything in between. Best known for her 1973 hit, “Midnight At The Oasis,” Muldaur has always been much more than a sexy one-hit wonder. Blessed with a voice that remains convincing regardless of the genre she chooses to tackle, her performances are a study in American musicology.

This performance, recorded at the legendary Trobadour in Los Angeles, followed the release of Maria Muldaur’s second solo album, Waitress In A Donut Shop. Unlike the majority of her live performances from this classic era, it captures one of the handful of concerts where she was not backed by her usual band of hippie renegades. Instead, this rare performance features Muldaur accompanied by seasoned jazz musicians, who provide an infectious big band feel that swings in all the right places.

None other than the legendary Benny Carter directed Muldaur’s band on this run. Admired as virtually any jazz musician ever, Carter was a contemporary of Duke Ellington (who he played with early in his career) and Count Basie and was universally respected for his abilities as a composer, musician and bandleader. Muldaur’s ensemble on this night featured the likes of Harry “Sweets” Edison and Snooky Young on trumpets and trombonist extraordinaire, J. J. Johnson. This set also captures Muldaur at her commercial peak, performing genre-breaking music with a stellar big band before a very appreciative audience.

Right from the start, Muldaur sets a swinging mood, opening with her take on Fats Waller’s “Squeeze Me,” followed by Jimmy Rogers’ classic “Any Old Time,” a song she recorded on her self-titled first album. The bluesy “Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You,” follows. Here Muldaur finds the perfect balance between sweet and sexy, with the musicians providing the perfect backdrop. Up next is “Sweetheart,” the song that contained the lyric that provided the title of her album, Waitress In A Donut Shop. This was one of two songs that Benny Carter and his band actually recorded on that album. Hearing a live rendition, featuring virtually the same musicians as the studio session, is quite the treat. Following this, Muldaur takes a break and encourages the band to do their own thing on Benny Carter’s original composition, “Doozy.”

By this point, everyone is well warmed up and the set kicks into high gear. The classic “It Don’t Mean A Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” is a perfect vehicle for Muldaur, taking the performance to the next level. This is such an obvious match, that one can only wonder why she didn’t record it for the album. Her smoldering take on Billy Holliday’s “Lover Man (Where Can You Be)” slows things down, while digging deeper into the emotional nuances of her voice. Her charm is undeniable and the performance is thoroughly engaging. Muldaur wouldn’t get around to releasing this song until almost a decade later. This performance easily stands up to her finest material from this era.

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Posted by on November 17, 2017 in 1960s, blues, folk music, jazz, other

 

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“Archie Bell & The Drells – Tighten up (1968)” on YouTube

“Archie Bell & The Drells – Tighten up (1968)” on YouTube

“Tighten Up” was written by Archie Bell and Billy Buttier. It was one of the first songs that Archie Bell & the Drells recorded, in a session in October 1967 at the Jones Town Studio in Houston, Texas, along with a number of songs including “She’s My Woman”. The instrumental music for “Tighten Up” had been developed by the T.S.U. Toronadoes in their live shows before and they brought it to Archie Bell & the Drells at the suggestion of Skipper Lee Frazer, a Houston disk jockey who worked with both groups.

Soon afterwards Bell was drafted into the U.S. Army and began serving in Vietnam. The song became a hit in Houston, and was picked up by Atlantic Records for distribution in April 1968. By the summer it topped both the Billboard R&B and pop charts. It also sold a million copies by May 1968, gaining an RIAA gold disc.

In the beginning of the song, Bell introduces himself and the Drells as being from Houston, Texas. According to the Billboard Book of Number One Hits by Fred Bronson, Bell had heard a comment after the Kennedy assassination in Dallas that “nothing good ever came out of Texas.” Bell wanted his listeners to know “we were from Texas and we were good.”

Bell continues in the song by stating, “We don’t only sing, but we dance just as good as we want.” This line is often misheard, and mis-transcribed, as “dance just as good as we walk”. Asked to clarify by writer Michael Corcoran, Archie Bell responded, “We dance just as good as we want. Hell, we dance a lot better than we walk.”

Although their leader was unavailable, the phenomenal success of the single prompted the band to rush out their first album, which included the songs they had recorded in late 1967 and early 1968 with The Toronadoes.

In 1969 the group recorded their first full album with Gamble and Huff, I Can’t Stop Dancing, which reached number 28 on the R&B chart.

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Posted by on October 31, 2017 in 1960s, black music artists

 

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“Iko Iko ~ The Dixie Cups Lyrics” 

“Iko Iko ~ The Dixie Cups Lyrics” 

“Iko Iko” (/ˈaɪkoʊ ˈaɪkoʊ/) is a much-covered New Orleans song that tells of a parade collision between two “tribes” of Mardi Gras Indians and the traditional confrontation. The song, under the original title “Jock-A-Mo”, was written and released as a single in 1953 by Sugar Boy and his Cane Cutters that failed to make the charts. The song first became popular in 1965 by the female pop group The Dixie Cups, who scored an international hit with “Iko Iko”. In 1967 as part of a lawsuit settlement between “Sugar Boy” James Crawford and the Dixie Cups, the trio were given part songwriting credit to the song. In 1972, Dr. John had a minor hit with his version of “Iko Iko”. The most successful charting version in the UK was recorded by Scottish singer Natasha England who took her 1982 version into the top 10. “Iko Iko” became an international hit again twice more, the first being the Belle Stars in June 1982 and again with Captain Jack in 2001.
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Posted by on October 7, 2017 in 1960s, music

 

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“That’s The Way Love Is”

“That’s The Way Love Is”

Featured image: http://www.ebreggae.com/

That’s the Way Love Is is the tenth studio album by soul musician Marvin Gaye, released on January 8, 1970, on the Tamla (Motown) label. Built on the success of the title track (#7 US Pop, #2 US R&B in late 1969) originally taken from M.P.G., and much like Gaye’s “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” after its success, was released with intent to sell albums based on the success of one particular single (a Motown trademark). Gaye was showing signs of disillusionment from the label’s powers-that-be mentality but it didn’t affect the singer’s performance as he gave a powerful vocal in the title track and was especially impressive with his version of The Beatles’ “Yesterday”. He achieved some success with a cover version of “How Can I Forget?” (originally recorded by The Temptations), which just missed out on the US Pop Top 40, making #41, and reached #18 on the R&B Charts. It’s B-Side, a cover of Jimmy Ruffin’s “Gonna Give Her All the Love I’ve Got”, made a separate chart entry, and peaked at #67 and #27 on the Pop and Soul Charts respectively. Gaye also recorded a version of Ruffin’s “Don’t You Miss Me a Little Bit Baby” for the album. The LP also features Gaye’s rendition of the socially conscious tune “Abraham, Martin & John”, which became a hit in the UK, peaking at #9 in June 1970. The single (and that of his duet single with Tammi Terrell titled “The Onion Song”) is widely regarded as a hint of what would follow a year later with his What’s Going On. He also covered The Temptations’ hits “I Wish It Would Rain” and “Cloud Nine”.

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Posted by on August 26, 2017 in 1960s, pop music/motown, r&b

 

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“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

I Got a Woman” (originally titled “I’ve Got a Woman“) is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray CharlesAtlantic Records released the song as a single in December 1954, with “Come Back Baby” as the B-side. Both songs later appeared on the 1957 album Ray Charles(subsequently reissued as Hallelujah I Love Her So).


The song was recorded in late 1954 in the Atlanta studios of Georgia Tech radio station WGST. It was a hit—Charles’ first—climbing quickly to #1 R&B in January 1955.[3] Charles told the Pop Chronicles that he performed this song for about a year before he recorded it on November 18, 1954.[4]The song would lead to more hits for Charles during this period when he was with Atlantic. It was later ranked No. 239 on Rolling Stones list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, one of Charles’ five songs on the list.[5] A re-recorded version by Ray Charles, entitled “I Gotta Woman” (ABC-Paramount10649) reached No. 79 on the Billboardpop chart in 1965.[6]

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Posted by on August 14, 2017 in 1950s, 1960s, blues, classic music, music

 

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“Burn – Vintage ‘1960s Girl Group Ellie Goulding Cover with Flame-O-Phone”

Image:  http://wearethedaniels.weebly.com


Robyn Adele Anderson (born February 19, 1989) is a multilingual vocalist based in New York City. She is a cast member and featured artist for Postmodern Jukebox with over 145 million YouTube views of her music videos. She is credited with the band’s breakthrough cover of “Thrift Shop” and “We Can’t Stop” in 2013.[1][2][3][4]Anderson also performed lead vocals for performances on Good Morning America (ABC) in 2013,[5] and TEDx in 2014.[6]

Robyn Adele Anderson
Robyn Adele Anderson on stage w Postmodern Jukebox.jpg

Anderson with Postmodern Jukebox in 2014 

 

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