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Category Archives: 1960s

“Stand By Me, Ben E. King, 1961”

“Stand By Me, Ben E. King, 1961”

Benjamin Earl King (born Benjamin Earl Nelson, September 28, 1938 – April 30, 2015), known as Ben E. King, was an American soul and R&B singer and record producer. He was perhaps best known as the singer and co-composer of “Stand by Me“—a US Top 10 hit, both in 1961 and later in 1986 (when it was used as the theme to the film of the same name), a number one hit in the UK in 1987, and no. 25 on the RIAA‘s list of Songs of the Century—and as one of the principal lead singers of the R&B vocal group the Drifters notably singing the lead vocals of one of their biggest global hit singles (and only U.S. #1 hit) “Save the Last Dance for Me“.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-11T09:33:30+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 11 Jan 2019 09:33:30 +0000 31, in 1960s, male vocalist, music, r&b

 

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“Heart Full Of Love – The Invincibles” 

“Heart Full Of Love – The Invincibles” 

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The Invincibles: Heart Full Of Love

Soulful soprano voices exist everywhere in Deep Soul music but few reach the stirringly emotional heights of this track from the LA group, The Invincibles. A few singles exist to their name (none being remotely affordable) but even fewer LPs. Well, to be precise, none.

Dave Richardson, Clifton Knight and Lester Johnson recorded their first few singles under Warner Bros. and their R&B subsidiary, Loma. “Heart Full of Love” is backed by and riddled with a noodling guitar of the sunny yet begging “I’ll Come Crawling” and then their relationship troubles continue with 1966’s deep anthem, “Can’t Win” about a guy whose done whatever it takes but just can’t seem to get there. Though these gems are extremely hard to acquire in their original forms,“Heart Full of Love” can be procured through the wonderfully out of print compilation, Soul Over The City, which spotlight’s a for favorites from the historic soul radio station KSOL of San Francisco. words / p dufrene

http://www.aquariumdrunkard.com/2015/09/17/the-invincibles-heart-full-of-love/

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-31T09:17:35+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 31 Dec 2018 09:17:35 +0000 31, in 1960s, soul oldies

 

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“Archie Bell & The Drells – Tighten up (1968)”

“Archie Bell & The Drells – Tighten up (1968)”

“Tighten Up” was written by Archie Bell and Billy Buttier. It was one of the first songs that Archie Bell & the Drells recorded, in a session in October 1967 at the Jones Town Studio in Houston, Texas, along with a number of songs including “She’s My Woman”. The instrumental music for “Tighten Up” had been developed by the T.S.U. Toronadoes in their live shows before and they brought it to Archie Bell & the Drells at the suggestion of Skipper Lee Frazer, a Houston disk jockey who worked with both groups.

Soon afterwards Bell was drafted into the U.S. Army and began serving in Vietnam. The song became a hit in Houston, and was picked up by Atlantic Records for distribution in April 1968. By the summer it topped both the Billboard R&B and pop charts. It also sold a million copies by May 1968, gaining an RIAA gold disc.

In the beginning of the song, Bell introduces himself and the Drells as being from Houston, Texas. According to the Billboard Book of Number One Hits by Fred Bronson, Bell had heard a comment after the Kennedy assassination in Dallas that “nothing good ever came out of Texas.” Bell wanted his listeners to know “we were from Texas and we were good.”

Bell continues in the song by stating, “We don’t only sing, but we dance just as good as we want.” This line is often misheard, and mis-transcribed, as “dance just as good as we walk”. Asked to clarify by writer Michael Corcoran, Archie Bell responded, “We dance just as good as we want. Hell, we dance a lot better than we walk.”

Although their leader was unavailable, the phenomenal success of the single prompted the band to rush out their first album, which included the songs they had recorded in late 1967 and early 1968 with The Toronadoes.

In 1969 the group recorded their first full album with Gamble and Huff, I Can’t Stop Dancing, which reached number 28 on the R&B chart.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-30T08:35:51+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 30 Dec 2018 08:35:51 +0000 31, in 1960s, black music artists

 

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 “Spirit in the Sky” Norman Greenbaum

 “Spirit in the Sky” Norman Greenbaum

Norman Joel Greenbaum (born November 20, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter. He is best known for writing and performing the 1969 song “Spirit in the Sky“.
Greenbaum was born in Malden, Massachusetts. He was raised in an Orthodox Jewish household and attended Hebrew school at Congregation Beth Israel.[1] His initial interest in music was sparked by southern blues music and the folk music that was popular in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He performed with various bands in high school and studied musicat Boston University for two years. In college he performed at local coffeehouses but eventually dropped out and moved to Los Angeles in 1965.

Greenbaum is best known for his song “Spirit in the Sky“. The song, with its combination of ‘heavy’ guitar, hand-clapping, and spiritual lyrics, was released by Warner Bros. Records in 1969. It sold two million copies in 1969 and 1970,[3] and received a gold discfrom the R.I.A.A. It has subsequently been used in many films, advertisements, and television shows.[3]

Although “Spirit in the Sky” has a clear Christian theme, Greenbaum was and remains an observant Jew.[4][5]Greenbaum says he was inspired to write the song after watching country singers singing a song on television. In an interview Greenbaum stated that western movies were the real inspiration for “Spirit in the Sky”:[6]

Norman Greenbaum: If you ask me what I based “Spirit In The Sky” on … what did we grow up watching? Westerns! These mean and nasty varmints get shot and they wanted to die with their boots on. So to me that was spiritual, they wanted to die with their boots on.

Ray Shasho: So that was the trigger that got you to write the song?

Norman Greenbaum: Yes. The song itself was simple, when you’re writing a song you keep it simple of course. It wasn’t like a Christian song of praise it was just a simple song. I had to use Christianity because I had to use something. But more important it wasn’t the Jesus part, it was the spirit in the sky. Funny enough … I wanted to die with my boots on.

Though Greenbaum is generally regarded as a one-hit wonder,[4][5]several of his records placed prominently in the charts, including “Canned Ham” in 1970, which reached number 46 on the Billboard pop chart. In 1966,[7] under the name Dr. West’s Medicine Show and Junk Band, he recorded the novelty hit “The Eggplant That Ate Chicago“.[7] In the 1960s Greenbaum also performed under the name Bruno Wolf with the Jim Kweskin Jug Band.[

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-30T08:00:11+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 30 Dec 2018 08:00:11 +0000 31, in 1960s, music, other, r&b

 

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“Rosie and the Originals-Angel Baby”

“Rosie and the Originals-Angel Baby”

Originally posted on:

MissBackInTheDayUSA

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-29T10:25:14+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 29 Dec 2018 10:25:14 +0000 31, in 1960s, doowop, female vocalist, music

 

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“Little Stevie Wonder – Fingertips. (Part 2)”

“Little Stevie Wonder – Fingertips. (Part 2)”

Fingertips” is a 1963 hit single recorded live by “Little” Stevie Wonder for Motown‘s then Tamla label. Wonder’s first hit single, “Fingertips” was the first live, non-studio recording to reach No.1 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart in the United States since Johnny Standley‘s 1952 comic monologue “It’s in the Book written and composed by Wonder’s mentors, Clarence Paul and Henry Cosby, “Fingertips” was originally a jazz instrumental recorded for Wonder’s first studio album, The Jazz Soul of Little Stevie. The live version of the song was recorded in June 1962 during a Motortown Revue performance at the Regal Theater in Chicago, Illinois. Containing only a few stanzas of improvised lyrics, “Fingertips” is essentially an instrumental piece, meant to showcase Wonder’s talents on the bongosand the harmonica.


“Part 2” of “Fingertips” is when Wonder shouts “Everybody say ‘yeah!'”, initiating a call and response exchange with the audience. After a couple of sung verses, each followed by Wonder’s brief harmonica playing (solos accompanied only by the audience’s rhythmic clapping), Wonder appears to bring things to a conclusion. On the night of the recording, Wonder, as usual started to leave the stage and the band went into the exit music, as comedian Bill Murray (known professionally as Winehead Willie) exhorted the crowd to “give him a hand”; however, Stevie unexpectedly changed his mind, returning to sing the “goodbye” encore. The other musicians were caught out, and the bass players had changed over to prepare for the next act on the bill, usually slated as The Marvelettes. As Wonder moves into his impromptu encore, the new bass player, Joe Swift, having replaced Larry Moses, can be heard on the recording, yelling out, “What key? What key?”

RELEASE

The live version of “Fingertips” was released on May 21, 1963 as a two-part single, with Part 2 (with the encore) as the B-side. The 707 mono features “Sunset” and “Contract on Love”. By August, the single B-side had reached the top of both the Billboard Pop Singles and R&B Singles charts.

“Fingertips” was Motown’s second number-one pop hit (following The Marvelettes’ “Please Mr. Postman”), and launched the then 13-year-old Wonder into the pop music stratosphere. The single’s success helped Wonder’s live album, Recorded Live: The 12 Year Old Genius, reach number-one on the Billboard Pop Albumschart, making him the youngest artist to accomplish that feat. Because of Part 2’s success, it would later feature on various compilation albums just as the full recording.

Both the studio and live versions of the song featured drumming by Marvin Gaye, who had been playing drums for Wonder and other Motown artists in 1960 before becoming a famous hitmaker in his own right.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-29T10:14:21+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 29 Dec 2018 10:14:21 +0000 31, in 1960s, classic music, pop music/motown

 

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Jerry Butler – For Your Precious Love

Jerry Butler – For Your Precious Love

For Your Precious Love” is a song written by Arthur Brooks, Richard Brooksand Jerry Butler, and performed by Jerry Butler and The Impressions in 1958. It was released as a single on Vee-Jay Records and peaked at number 11 on the Billboard Best Sellers in Stores and Top 100 charts. The song was ranked #335 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time in 2010. source

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-24T10:34:57+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 24 Dec 2018 10:34:57 +0000 31, in 1960s, doowop, male vocal group, male vocalist

 

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