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Category Archives: 1960s

“Little Stevie Wonder – Fingertips. (Part 2)”

“Little Stevie Wonder – Fingertips. (Part 2)”

Fingertips” is a 1963 hit single recorded live by “Little” Stevie Wonder for Motown‘s then Tamla label. Wonder’s first hit single, “Fingertips” was the first live, non-studio recording to reach No.1 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart in the United States since Johnny Standley‘s 1952 comic monologue “It’s in the Book written and composed by Wonder’s mentors, Clarence Paul and Henry Cosby, “Fingertips” was originally a jazz instrumental recorded for Wonder’s first studio album, The Jazz Soul of Little Stevie. The live version of the song was recorded in June 1962 during a Motortown Revue performance at the Regal Theater in Chicago, Illinois. Containing only a few stanzas of improvised lyrics, “Fingertips” is essentially an instrumental piece, meant to showcase Wonder’s talents on the bongosand the harmonica.


“Part 2” of “Fingertips” is when Wonder shouts “Everybody say ‘yeah!'”, initiating a call and response exchange with the audience. After a couple of sung verses, each followed by Wonder’s brief harmonica playing (solos accompanied only by the audience’s rhythmic clapping), Wonder appears to bring things to a conclusion. On the night of the recording, Wonder, as usual started to leave the stage and the band went into the exit music, as comedian Bill Murray (known professionally as Winehead Willie) exhorted the crowd to “give him a hand”; however, Stevie unexpectedly changed his mind, returning to sing the “goodbye” encore. The other musicians were caught out, and the bass players had changed over to prepare for the next act on the bill, usually slated as The Marvelettes. As Wonder moves into his impromptu encore, the new bass player, Joe Swift, having replaced Larry Moses, can be heard on the recording, yelling out, “What key? What key?”

RELEASE

The live version of “Fingertips” was released on May 21, 1963 as a two-part single, with Part 2 (with the encore) as the B-side. The 707 mono features “Sunset” and “Contract on Love”. By August, the single B-side had reached the top of both the Billboard Pop Singles and R&B Singles charts.

“Fingertips” was Motown’s second number-one pop hit (following The Marvelettes’ “Please Mr. Postman”), and launched the then 13-year-old Wonder into the pop music stratosphere. The single’s success helped Wonder’s live album, Recorded Live: The 12 Year Old Genius, reach number-one on the Billboard Pop Albumschart, making him the youngest artist to accomplish that feat. Because of Part 2’s success, it would later feature on various compilation albums just as the full recording.

Both the studio and live versions of the song featured drumming by Marvin Gaye, who had been playing drums for Wonder and other Motown artists in 1960 before becoming a famous hitmaker in his own right.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-14T10:44:55+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 14 Jul 2018 10:44:55 +0000 31, in 1960s, classic music, pop music/motown

 

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The Lion Sleeps Tonight” by the Tokens

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The Lion Sleeps Tonight” is a song written and recorded originally by Solomon Linda with the Evening Birds[1] for the South African Gallo Record Company in 1939, under the title “Mbube“. Composed in Zulu, it was adapted and covered internationally by many 1950s and ’60s pop and folk revival artists, including the Weavers, Jimmy Dorsey, Yma Sumac, Miriam Makeba and the Kingston Trio. In 1961, it became a number one hit in the United States as adapted in English with the best-known version by the doo-wop group the Tokens. It went on to earn at least US$15 million in royalties from cover versions and film licensing. The pop group Tight Fit had a number one hit in the UK with the song in 1982.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-10T10:58:19+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 10 Jul 2018 10:58:19 +0000 31, in 1960s, pop music

 

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“Windy” by The Association

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Windy” is a pop music song written by Ruthann Friedman and recorded by The Association. Released in 1967, the song reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in July of that year. Overseas, it went to #34 in Australia, and #3 in Yugoslavia. Later in 1967 an instrumental version by jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery became his biggest Hot 100 hit when it peaked at #44. “Windy” was The Association’s second U.S. #1, following “Cherish” in 1966. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 4 song for 1967. The lead vocals were sung in unison by Russ Giguere and Larry Ramos. Ramos claimed that Ruthann Friedman had written the song about a man, and that The Association changed the lyrics to make it about a woman. Friedman refuted the rumor on her website:

“There are many explanations of who Windy actually was in Ruthann’s life. She would have you know, she being me, Ruthann Friedman, that none of them are true. Windy was indeed a female and purely a fictitious character who popped into my head one fine day in 1967 . . .

During the recording session The Association members, sure that they were in the middle of recording a hit, called the songwriter, me again, in to sing on the fade at the end. I can be heard singing a blues harmony as the song fades out…”

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-01T09:57:08+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 01 Jul 2018 09:57:08 +0000 31, in 1960s, pop music

 

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“Get Together” The Youngbloods

The song was originally recorded as “Let’s Get Together” by the Kingston Trio in a live performance in March 1964 that was released on June 1, 1964, on their album Back in Town. While it was not released as a single, this version was the first to bring the song to the attention of the general public. The Kingston Trio often performed it live.

A pre-Byrds David Crosby recorded “Get Together” around the same time as the Trio, but possibly a few weeks later, since the band arrangement includes the riff from the Beatles’ version of “Twist and Shout”, released earlier in Britain but not in the United States until April. Crosby’s version, possibly the first studio recording and pre-dating release of the Trio’s version, appeared many years later on the Preflyte album.

A version of the song first broke into the top forty in 1965, when We Five, produced by Kingston Trio manager Frank Werber, released “Let’s Get Together” as the follow-up to their top ten hit “You Were on My Mind”. While it did not achieve the same level of success as the other, “Let’s Get Together” provided the group with a second top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 when it peaked at number 31. It would be their last hit record.

“Let’s Get Together” was the third song on side 2 of the Jefferson Airplane’s first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, released in August 1966. As Tim Jurgens said in his review of the album in the January 1967 issue of Crawdaddy, Jefferson Airplane Takes Offis the most important album of American rock issued this year (1966); it is the first LP to come out of the new San Francisco music scene..”. He called “Let’s Get Together” a “most sensitive, hopeful and contemporary ballad”, and wondered why it isn’t sung in church. However, the song wasn’t released as a single, although the album did make the top 100 of 1966, as number 97.

In 1967, the Youngbloods released their version of the song under the title “Get Together”. It became a minor Hot 100 hit for them, peaking at number 62 and reaching 37 on the US adult contemporary chart.However, renewed interest in the Youngbloods’ version came when it was used in a radio public service announcement as a call for brotherhood by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The Youngbloods’ version, the most-remembered today, was re-released in 1969, peaking at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Another version was released in 1967 by the Chicago psychedelic group H. P. Lovecraft on their debut album.

In 1968, the Sunshine Company released a version of the song titled “Let’s Get Together” as a single that reached number 112 on the Billboard chart.

Also in 1968, the Canadian group 3’s a Crowdreleased their version of the song as a single, titled “Let’s Get Together”. It peaked at number 70 on Canada’s national singles chart.

Smith recorded a version on their 1969 debut album, sung by Gayle McCormick while, in the same year, it was recorded by Carpenters and was the fourth track on their debut album “Offering” (later re-released as “Ticket to Ride”).

In 1970, Gwen & Jerry Collins released a version of the song as a single that reached number 34 on the US country chart.

In March 1970, the Dave Clark Five reached number 8 on the UK Singles Chart with their version retitled “Everybody Get Together”

In 1995, Big Mountain released a version of the song titled as a single that reached number 28 on the US adult contemporary chart and number 44 on the Billboard Hot 100.It also reached number 32 on Cash Box.

And on Inauguraton Day 2017, the group Bahari released their version of the song.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-25T11:00:25+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 25 Jun 2018 11:00:25 +0000 31, in 1960s

 

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“Baby Baby Don’t Cry The Miracles”

“Baby Baby Don’t Cry The Miracles”

Baby, Baby Don’t Cry”, released in December 1968, is a single recorded by The Miracles for Motown Records‘ Tamla label. The composition was written by Miracles lead singer Smokey Robinson, Motown staff writers Al Cleveland and Terry Johnson, a former member of The Flamingos. Robinson, Johnson, and Miracles member Warren “Pete” Moore were the song’s producers.

Baby Baby Don’t Cry” was a top 10 pop hit for The Miracles, peaking at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, and at a Top 10 R&B hit as well,peaking as number three on Billboard’s R&B singles chart.It sold over one million copies,and has inspired cover versions by Gerald Wilson and His Orchestra, and Projekt. The song is noted for Smokey’s spoken recitation at the beginning as well as before the second verse. The spoken lines are: “Nothing so blue as a heart in pain/Nothing so sad as a tear in vain”, and “You trusted him and gave him your love/A love he proved unworthy of”. The song uses an extended bridge that repeats the minor and diminished chords before going up half a step for the final repeated Choruses.

Although not given writing credit on this particular tune, Miracle Marv Tarplin’s outstanding guitar work plays an important role in this song,his gentle but effective riffs being evident from the song’s beginning,giving a “raindrop” effect reminiscent of someone crying (the song’s main theme).

The Miracles performed this song on a 1969 Telecast of The Mike Douglas Show, a performance that was re-broadcast many years later on VH-1.

The success of this song ended a period of relatively mediocre chart action for The Miracles during 1968, and set the stage for their biggest hit ever with Smokey as lead singer, 1970’s multi-million selling #1 hit The Tears of a Clown.

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-18T10:06:40+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 18 Jun 2018 10:06:40 +0000 31, in 1960s, music, pop music/motown

 

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A FATHERS’ DAY TRIBUTE TO STEPFATHERS

A FATHERS’ DAY TRIBUTE TO STEPFATHERS

It was released in 1969, and reached number 2 on the R&B charts and number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 that same year. Its composer, Richard Lewis Spencer, won a Grammy Award for Best R&B song in 1970.[2]

“Color Him Father” is one of the best known songs by The Winstons. It was released as a single, and the B-side contained an instrumental track titled “Amen, Brother”. “Amen, Brother” contains what has now become one of the most heavily sampleddrum breaks in the history of electronic music, especially jungle and breakbeat hardcore. This break has become known as the Amen Break.

“Color Him Father” is an unabashedly sentimental song in which a boy expresses his love for his stepfather, a hardworking and generous man who married his widowed mother, who had seven children, and embraced them as his own after her first husband was “killed in the war.” (“She said she thought that she could never love again/And then there he stood with that big, wide grin.”) The song’s lyrics resonated strongly with the public in 1969, the height of the Vietnam War. The word “color,” in the song, means “label” or “call” and follows the ‘color’ motif set in Barbra Streisand’s 1963 release of “My Coloring Book.” The song served as a major musical inspiration for the 2016 track “Celebrate” by Anderson .Paak.

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Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-12T09:15:04+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 12 Jun 2018 09:15:04 +0000 31, in 1960s, r&b

 

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“Rosie and the Originals-Angel Baby”

“Rosie and the Originals-Angel Baby”

Originally posted on:

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-11T13:27:59+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 11 Jun 2018 13:27:59 +0000 31, in 1960s, doowop, female vocalist, music

 

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