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Category Archives: 1960s

THE SUPREMES – NATHAN JONES

THE SUPREMES – NATHAN JONES

Nathan Jones” is a hit single recorded by The Supremes, released in spring 1971 (see 1971 in music) on the Motown label. Produced by Frank Wilson and written by Leonard Caston – a.k.a. Leonard Caston, Jr. – and Kathy Wakefield, “Nathan Jones” was one of eight Top 40 hits the Supremes recorded after its original frontwoman, Diana Ross, left the group for a solo career.

Overview

The song centers around a woman’s longing for her former lover, a man named Nathan Jones, who left her nearly a year ago “to ease [his] mind.” Suffering through the long separation (“Winter’s past, spring, and fall”) without any contact or communication between herself and Jones, the narrator is no longer in love with Jones, remarking that “Nathan Jones/you’ve been gone too long”.

Supremes version
Nathan Jones” is an unusual entry among the Supremes’ singles repertoire for several reasons, not the least of which is the fact that all three members of the group (Jean Terrell, Mary Wilson, and Cindy Birdsong) sing the song’s lead vocal in unison. Clydie King was asked to sing along with the group to give the song a fuller vocal sound. While working on the song, producer Frank Wilson had in mind a rock music style of phrasing for the song, resulting in the unison vocals. The unison vocals would repeatedly be dubbed to create a layered harmonic tone similar to that present in the production of vocal group ABBA[original research?]. In addition, Wilson had his engineer, Cal Harris, use what can (now) be considered classic studio sensibilities to take The Funk Brothers‘ backing tracks for “Nathan Jones” and give them a phase shifting sound at various points during the song. This was accomplished by either using a second recorder (as the Beatles would have done) or (less likely) an outboard processor such as the blue faced MXR flanger.

Released as a single on April 15, 1971 with “Happy is a Bumpy Road” as the B-side, “Nathan Jones” peaked at number sixteen on the Billboard Pop Singles chart, number-eight on the Billboard R&B chart. Overseas, the single went to number five on the UK Singles Chart. “Nathan Jones” was the most successful single released from the Supremes’ fourteenth regular studio album, Touch.

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“Going To A GoGo” – Smokey Robinson and the Miracles

“Going To A GoGo” – Smokey Robinson and the Miracles

 

Going to a Go-Go is a 1965 album by the Miracles, the first to credit the group as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles. It includes four of the Miracles’ Top 20 hits: “Ooo Baby Baby”, “The Tracks of My Tears”, “Going to a Go-Go”, and “My Girl Has Gone”. It was produced by Miracles lead singer Smokey Robinson, along with Frank Wilson and William “Mickey” Stevenson.  Youtube.com

 

 

 

 

 
 

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“Stevie Wonder – Blowin’ In The Wind”

“Blowin’ in the Wind” is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 and released as a single and on his album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan in 1963. Although it has been described as a protest song, it poses a series of rhetorical questions about peace, war, and freedom. The refrain “The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind” has been described as “impenetrably ambiguous: either the answer is so obvious it is right in your face, or the answer is as intangible as the wind”.

Blowin’ in the Wind” has been recorded by hundreds of artists. The most commercially successful version is by folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary, who released the song in June 1963, three weeks after The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan was issued. Albert Grossman, then managing both Dylan and Peter, Paul and Mary, brought the trio the song which they promptly recorded (on a single take) and released. The trio’s version, which was the title track of their third album, peaked at number 2 on the Billboard charts. The group’s version also went to number one on the Middle-Road charts for five weeks.

Other notable recordings include those by Sielun Veljet, who released it as a single, and Stevie Wonder, whose version became a top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1966. The Me First and the Gimme Gimmes’ version appears on their album Blow in the Wind, a play on the title of the song. Marlene Dietrich recorded a German version of the song (titled Die Antwort Weiss Ganz Allein Der Wind”) which peak at #32 in Germany charts.
Tore Lagergren wrote lyrics in Swedish, “Och vinden ger svar” (“and the wind gives answer”), which charted at Svensktoppen for two weeks in 1963, first as recorded by Otto, Berndt och Beppo, peaking at number 8 on October 12, and by Lars Lönndahl during November 9–15 with sixth & seventh position. Both were released on single A-es in 1963. This version was also recorded by Sven-Ingvars as the B-side of the single “Du ska tro på mej”, released in March 1967. With these lyrics, the song also charted at Svensktoppen in 1970, with Michael med Salt och peppar.
Glen Campbell recorded an instrumental version of the song for his 1964 album The Astounding 12-String Guitar of Glen Campbell.
Neil Young recorded an electric version of the song for his 1991 live album Weld_(album).
Dolly Parton recorded the song for her 2005 covers album Those Were the Days.
Steve Alaimo recorded the song in 1965. Despite his national presence on Where the Action Is, his version failed to chart on Billboard’s Hot 100. It did however reach #139 on Cashbox charts.
In some live performances, Pete Seeger includes an additional verse as a spoof which criticizes Dylan’s use of over-extended metaphors and wordiness. The verse is usually sung as follows,

“How many words can be written on a page, before they begin to bleed? How many books can one man own, before he has learned to read? How many meanings can he give to a phrase, before, from his lexicon he’s freed?”

 

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“Heart Full Of Love – The Invincibles” 

“Heart Full Of Love – The Invincibles” 
The Courtesy of Pinterest

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The Invincibles: Heart Full Of Love

Soulful soprano voices exist everywhere in Deep Soul music but few reach the stirringly emotional heights of this track from the LA group, The Invincibles. A few singles exist to their name (none being remotely affordable) but even fewer LPs. Well, to be precise, none.

Dave Richardson, Clifton Knight and Lester Johnson recorded their first few singles under Warner Bros. and their R&B subsidiary, Loma. “Heart Full of Love” is backed by and riddled with a noodling guitar of the sunny yet begging “I’ll Come Crawling” and then their relationship troubles continue with 1966’s deep anthem, “Can’t Win” about a guy whose done whatever it takes but just can’t seem to get there. Though these gems are extremely hard to acquire in their original forms,“Heart Full of Love” can be procured through the wonderfully out of print compilation, Soul Over The City, which spotlight’s a for favorites from the historic soul radio station KSOL of San Francisco. words / p dufrene

http://www.aquariumdrunkard.com/2015/09/17/the-invincibles-heart-full-of-love/

 

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“Rosie and the Originals-Angel Baby”

“Rosie and the Originals-Angel Baby”

Originally posted on:

MissBackInTheDayUSA

 

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The Lion Sleeps Tonight” by the Tokens

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The Lion Sleeps Tonight” is a song written and recorded originally by Solomon Linda with the Evening Birds[1] for the South African Gallo Record Company in 1939, under the title “Mbube“. Composed in Zulu, it was adapted and covered internationally by many 1950s and ’60s pop and folk revival artists, including the Weavers, Jimmy Dorsey, Yma Sumac, Miriam Makeba and the Kingston Trio. In 1961, it became a number one hit in the United States as adapted in English with the best-known version by the doo-wop group the Tokens. It went on to earn at least US$15 million in royalties from cover versions and film licensing. The pop group Tight Fit had a number one hit in the UK with the song in 1982.

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Posted by on 04/10 in 1960s, pop music

 

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The Temptations – The Girl is Alright With Me

The Temptations – The Girl is Alright With Me

The Girl’s Alright with Me” is a 1964 song recorded by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label. The B-side to their Top 40 hit “I’ll Be in Trouble”, the song was also able to chart on its own, peaking at number 102 on Billboard Pop Charts.

It was written by Eddie Kendricks, Norman Whitfield, and Eddie Holland, and produced by Whitfield. Whitfield would rerecord the song with his act The Undisputed Truth some ten years later for their album Down To Earth.

“The Girl’s Alright With

 
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Posted by on 04/10 in 1960s

 

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