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Category Archives: 1950s

“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

I Got a Woman” (originally titled “I’ve Got a Woman“) is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray CharlesAtlantic Records released the song as a single in December 1954, with “Come Back Baby” as the B-side. Both songs later appeared on the 1957 album Ray Charles(subsequently reissued as Hallelujah I Love Her So).


The song was recorded in late 1954 in the Atlanta studios of Georgia Tech radio station WGST. It was a hit—Charles’ first—climbing quickly to #1 R&B in January 1955.[3] Charles told the Pop Chronicles that he performed this song for about a year before he recorded it on November 18, 1954.[4]The song would lead to more hits for Charles during this period when he was with Atlantic. It was later ranked No. 239 on Rolling Stones list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, one of Charles’ five songs on the list.[5] A re-recorded version by Ray Charles, entitled “I Gotta Woman” (ABC-Paramount10649) reached No. 79 on the Billboardpop chart in 1965.[6]

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2017 in 1950s, 1960s, blues, classic music, music

 

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“Timber – Vintage 1950’s Doo Wop Pitbull / Ke$ha Cover” 

“Timber – Vintage 1950’s Doo Wop Pitbull / Ke$ha Cover” 

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Our friends The Tee Tones helped us take Pitbull’s “Timber” back in time to the 1950’s, where it would have undoubtedly been played at sock hops across the country. Special thanks to saxophonist David Luther for literally jumping in at the last minute to lend his talents on sax – visit his site here: http://davidluthermusic.com

Postmodern Jukebox: http://www.postmodernjukebox.com 
My Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scottbradleemusic The Tee Tones on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theteetones

The Band:

Robyn Adele Anderson – lead vocals http://www.facebook.com/robynadeleanderson Gerard Giddens – backup vocals Scout Ford – backup vocals Bernard Taylor – backup vocals David Luther – sax (check out his channel: http://www.youtube.com/uncleheavy

Adam Kubota – bass http://www.facebook.com/adamkubotabass Chip Thomas – drums Scott Bradlee – piano http://www.twitter.com/scottbradlee

http://glee.wikia.com/wiki/File:Timber_-_Vintage_1950’s_Doo_Wop_Pitbull_Ke$ha_Cover

Get the mp3 on our album: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/twist-is-the-new-twerk/id808705152 On Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scottbradlee

 
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Posted by on August 7, 2017 in 1950s, doowop, music, retro

 

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“Iko Iko ~ The Dixie Cups Lyrics” 

“Iko Iko” (/ˈaɪkoʊ ˈaɪkoʊ/) is a much-covered New Orleans song that tells of a parade collision between two “tribes” of Mardi Gras Indians and the traditional confrontation. The song, under the original title “Jock-A-Mo”, was written and released as a single in 1953 by Sugar Boy and his Cane Cutters that failed to make the charts. The song first became popular in 1965 by the female pop group The Dixie Cups, who scored an international hit with “Iko Iko”. In 1967 as part of a lawsuit settlement between “Sugar Boy” James Crawford and the Dixie Cups, the trio were given part songwriting credit to the song. In 1972, Dr. John had a minor hit with his version of “Iko Iko”. The most successful charting version in the UK was recorded by Scottish singer Natasha England who took her 1982 version into the top 10. “Iko Iko” became an international hit again twice more, the first being the Belle Stars in June 1982 and again with Captain Jack in 2001.
en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2017 in 1950s, music

 

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“Fannie Mae-Buster Brown”

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Buster Brown (August 15, 1911 – January 31, 1976)[1] was an American blues and R&B singer best known for his hit, “Fannie Mae”.[1]

Brown was born in Cordele, Georgia.[1] In the 1930s and 1940s he played harmonica at local clubs and made a few non-commercial recordings. These included “War Song” and “I’m Gonna Make You Happy” (1943), which were recorded when he played at the folk festival at Fort Valley (GA) State Teachers College, for the Library of Congress’ Folk Music Archive.[2]

Biography

Brown was born in Cordele, Georgia. In the 1930s and 1940s he played harmonica at local clubs and made a few non-commercial recordings. These included “War Song” and “I’m Gonna Make You Happy” (1943), which were recorded when he played at the folk festival at Fort Valley (GA) State Teachers College, for the Library of Congress’ Folk Music Archive.

Brown moved to New York in 1956, where he was discovered by Fire Records owner Bobby Robinson. In 1959, at almost fifty years of age, Brown recorded the rustic blues, “Fannie Mae”, which featured Brown’s harmonica playing and whoops, which went to # 38 in the U.S. Top 40, and to #1 on the R&B chart in April 1960. His remake of Louis Jordan’s “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby” reached # 81 on the pop charts later in 1960, but did not make the R&B chart. “Sugar Babe” was his only other hit, in 1962, reaching # 19 on the R&B chart and # 99 on the pop chart.

In later years he recorded for Checker Records and for numerous small record labels.[5] He also co-wrote the song “Doctor Brown” with J. T. Brown, which was later covered by Fleetwood Mac on their 1968 album, Mr. Wonderful.

Death
Brown died in New York in 1976, at the age of 64.

It is often erroneously cited that Brown’s real name was “Wayman Glasco” – however, that was Brown’s manager who, after his death, bought all of Brown’s publishing – thus unintentionally creating the confusion. Though likely a nickname, or alias, Buster Brown may have been his birth name.[citation needed]

Fanny Mae-Buster Brown-original song-1959

 

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“Fats Domino – Blueberry hill (1956)”

“Fats Domino – Blueberry hill (1956)”

Antoine “Fats” Domino, Jr. (born February 26, 1928) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. Domino released five gold (million-copy-selling) records before 1955.[1] He also had 35 Top 40 American hits and has a music style based on traditional rhythm and blues ensembles of bass, piano, electric guitar, drums, and saxophone.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

Fats domino – Blueberry hill (1956):

 

 

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