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Dream On Aerosmith

Dream On Aerosmith

Aerosmith is an American rock band, sometimes referred to as “the Bad Boys from Boston” and “America’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band”. Their style, which is rooted in blues-based hard rock,[9][10] has come to also incorporate elements of pop, heavy metal, and rhythm and blues, and has inspired many subsequent rock artists. They were formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1970. Guitarist Joe Perry and bassist Tom Hamilton, originally in a band together called the Jam Band, met up with vocalist/pianist/harmonicist Steven Tyler, drummer Joey Kramer, and guitarist Ray Tabano, and formed Aerosmith. In 1971, Tabano was replaced by Brad Whitford, and the band began developing a following in Boston.

source
As featured on The Very Best Of Aerosmith.

Lyrics:

Every time I look in the mirror
All these lines on my face getting clearer
The past is gone
It went by, like dusk to dawn
Isn’t that the way
Everybody’s got their dues in life to pay

Yeah, sing with me, sing for the year
Sing for the laughter, sing for the tear
Sing with me, just for today
Maybe tomorrow, the good Lord will take you away

Dream On Dream On Dream On
Dream until your dream comes true
Dream On Dream On Dream On
Dream until your dream comes through
Dream On Dream On Dream On
Dream On Dream On
Dream On Dream On, ….

 
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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T11:40:45-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 11:40:45 -0800 31, in music, rock

 

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“Maybe”… Baby

Originally posted on:

Miss Back In The DayUSA

Maybe” is a song with words and music originally credited to End Records owner George Goldner and “Casey”. The co-writing credit was later transferred to Richard Barrett. Arlene Smith, lead singer of The Chantels, is believed to be an uncredited co-writer.[citation needed] It was first recorded by the Chantels on October 16, 1957, in a doo-wopstyle with Barrett playing piano, and released in December 1957. It climbed the charts in January 1958, reaching No. 15 in the BillboardHot 100 and No. 2 in the Billboard R&B chart. It was subsequently described as “arguably, the first true glimmering of the girl groupsound”. Rolling Stone ranked it No. 199 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The song has been covered by many artists, including Janis Joplin, The Three Degrees(whose 1970 version became a top thirty hit) and The Shangri-Las. John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers has performed the song in concert, as seen on Live at Slane Castle.

The song made an appearance in the 2010 video game Mafia II, even though the game takes place in 1951 and the song was recorded in 1957.

Billboard named the song No. 60 on its list of 100 Greatest Girl Group Songs of All Time.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T11:10:43-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 11:10:43 -0800 31, in 1950s, doowop, female vocal group

 

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“How To Make Cheese Empanadas” 

Makes: 4

INGREDIENTS

3 Cups Crumbled or shredded cheese (use mozzarella if you can not get a good fresh cheese)

1/2 White onion, finely chopped
1 Egg, yolk and egg white separated, lightly beaten
2-3 Demerara sugar (type of sugar that keeps its crystallized form in the oven)
For the mass
1 package 16 units TAPAMAR

INSTRUCTIONS

Mix the cheese and the chopped onion

To form the empanadas put a tablespoon of the mixture of cheese and onion in the center of the empanadas tapas.
Using a pastry brush, spray the edges of the lids with the egg white (this will help seal the patties to prevent the cheese from spilling when they are baking).
Fold the lids and seal the edges using a fork.
Paint the top of the empanadas with the egg yolk, this will give them a nice golden color when they are baked.
Sprinkle the sugar on top of the empanadas.
Refrigerate the empanadas for at least a half hour, this will help to seal them correctly.
Preheat the oven to 400 F and bake the empanadas for 20-25 minutes or until they begin to brown.
Serve hot empanadas.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T11:02:33-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 11:02:33 -0800 31, in music

 

“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

Chameleon is the sixth album by American singing trio Labelle. Though Patti LaBelle’s autobiography Don’t Block The Blessings revealed that LaBelle planned a follow-up to Chameleon entitled Shaman, the album never materialized. The trio would not release another new recording until 2008’s Back to Now. The final album was moderately successful peaking at #94 at the Pop charts and #21 on the R&B charts. Only two singles made the charts which were “Get You Somebody New” which peaked at #50 on the Pop charts and their memorable song “Isn’t It A Shame” which debuted at #18 on the R&B charts. “Isn’t It A Shame” was later sampled by Nelly on his 2004 hit, “My Place”, which featured Jaheim.

Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patti LaBelle, is an American singer, author, actress, and entrepreneur. LaBelle began her career in the early 1960s as lead singer and front woman of the vocal group, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles. Following the group’s name change to Labelle in the early 1970s, she released the iconic disco song “Lady Marmalade” and the group later became the first African-American vocal group to land the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.[1] After the group split in 1976, LaBelle began a successful solo career, starting with her critically acclaimed debut album, which included the career-defining song, “You Are My Friend”. LaBelle became a mainstream solo star in 1984 following the success of the singles, “If Only You Knew”, “New Attitude” and “Stir It Up”, with the latter two crossing over to pop audiences becoming radio staples.[1]

Early life and career

Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles

Patti joined a local church choir at the Beulah Baptist Church at ten and performed her first solo two years later, while she also grew up listening to secular music styles such as R&B and jazz music. When she was fifteen, she won a talent competition at her high school. This success led to Patti forming her first singing group, the Ordettes, in 1960, with schoolmates Jean Brown, Yvonne Hogen and Johnnie Dawson.[7] The group, with Patti as front woman, became a local attraction until two of its members left to marry.[8] In 1962, the Ordettes included three new members, Cindy Birdsong, Sarah Dash and Nona Hendryx, the latter two girls having sung for another defunct vocal group.[8] That year, they auditioned for local record label owner Harold Robinson. Robinson agreed to work with the group after Patti began singing the song “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”. Initially Robinson was dismissive of Patti due to him feeling Patti was “too dark and too plain”.[8] Shortly after signing them, he had them record as the Blue Belles and they were selected to promote the recording of “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”, which had been recorded by The Starlets, but was assigned as a Blue Belles single due to label conflict.[8] The Starlets’ manager sued Harold Robinson after the Blue Belles were seen performing a lip-synching version of the song on American Bandstand.[8] After settling out of court, Robinson altered the group’s name to “Patti LaBelle and The Blue Belles”.[8] Initially, a Billboard ad cited the group as “Patti Bell and the Blue Bells”.[9] In 1963, the group scored their first hit single with the ballad “Down the Aisle (The Wedding Song)” which became a crossover top 40 hit on the Billboard pop and R&B charts after King Records issued it. Later in the year, they recorded their rendition of the standard “You’ll Never Walk Alone”; the single was later re-released on Cameo-Parkway Records where the group scored a second hit on the pop charts with the song in 1964. Another charted single, “Danny Boy”, was released that same year. In 1965, after Cameo-Parkway folded, the group moved to New York and signed with Atlantic Records where they recorded twelve singles for the label, including the mildly charted singles “All or Nothing” and “Take Me for a Little While”. The group’s Atlantic tenure included their rendition of “Over the Rainbow” and a version of the song “Groovy Kind of Love”. In 1967, Birdsong left the group to join The Supremes and by 1970 the group had been dropped from Atlantic Records as well as by their longtime manager Bernard Montague. That year, Vicki Wickham, producer of the UK music show, Ready, Steady, Go, agreed to manage the group after Dusty Springfield mentioned signing them. Wickham’s first direction for the group was for them to change their name to simply Labelle and advised the group to renew their act, going for a more homegrown look and sound that reflected psychedelic soul. In 1971, the group opened for The Who in several stops on the group’s U.S. tour.

Labelle signed with the Warner Music imprint, Track Records, and released their self-titled debut album in 1971. The record’s psychedelic soul sound and its blending of rock and soul rhythms was a departure from the group’s early sound. That same year, they sang background vocals on Laura Nyro’s album, Gonna Take a Miracle. A year later, in 1972, the group released Moon Shadow, which repeated the homegrown gritty sound of the previous album. In 1973, influenced by glam rockers David Bowie and Elton John, Wickham had the group dressed in silver space suits and luminescent makeup.[10] After their third successive album, Pressure Cookin’, failed to generate a hit, Labelle signed with Epic Records in 1974, releasing their most successful album to date, with Nightbirds, which blended soul, funk and rock music, thanks to the work of the album’s producer, Allen Toussaint. The single, “Lady Marmalade”, would become their biggest-selling single, going number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over a million copies, as did Nightbirds, which later earned a RIAA gold award, for sales of a million units. In October 1974, Labelle made pop history by becoming the first rock and roll vocal group to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House.[11] Riding high on the success of “Lady Marmalade” and the Nightbirds album, Labelle made the cover of Rolling Stone in 1975. Labelle released two more albums, Chameleon and Phoenix in 1975 and 1976 respectively. While both albums continued the group’s critical success, none of the singles issued on those albums ever crossed over to the pop charts.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T10:59:07-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 10:59:07 -0800 31, in black music artists, jazz, music, pop music, r&b

 

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“The Platters – Smoke Get In Your Eyes – Lyrics”

“The Platters – Smoke Get In Your Eyes – Lyrics”

The Platters are an American vocal group formed in 1952. They were one of the most successful vocal groups of the early rock and roll era. Their distinctive sound was a bridge between the pre-rock Tin Pan Alley tradition and the burgeoning new genre. source

 
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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T10:53:52-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 10:53:52 -0800 31, in 1950s, 1960s, doowop, reflections

 

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“Hey There Lonely Girl!”

Image: imgcade.com

In 1962, Holman made his first record, “What You Don’t Know Won’t Hurt You” on Leopard Records.[1] It was in the Philadelphia soul scene that he began to develop his trademark style. While still in college, he recorded his first hit record, “This Can’t Be True” (1965), which reached #17 on the Billboard charts.[1] Other hits began to follow: “Am I A Loser From The Start” (1966), “I Love You” (1969), “Don’t Stop Now” (1970), and “Cathy Called” (1970). After singing with the Philadelphia groups The Delfonics and The Stylistics, Holman finally struck personal gold in 1970 with his ballad, “Hey There Lonely Girl” (originally “Hey There Lonely Boy” recorded in 1963 by Ruby and the Romantics), which peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The track peaked at number 4 in the UK Singles Chart in November 1974.[2] It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc from the R.I.A.A. in March 1970.[3]

British journalist Tony Cummings once wrote, “Eddie Holman’s voice, an astonishing precision instrument which can leap octaves with the speed of mercury and bend notes into shapes unimagined by lesser singers, has assured its possessor a place in soul history.”[citation needed]

In 1977, Eddie had a brief resurgence in popularity with his last two hit singles, “This Will Be A Night To Remember” and “You Make My Life Complete”.

Holman owns his own record label, Agape Records, and music publishing company, Schoochiebug Music Publishing. He also continues to tour with the Eddie Holman Band. During the summer of 2007, Holman performed weekly for the passengers aboard the Sun Princess cruise ship while it was en route to the inside passage of Alaska.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T10:53:00-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 10:53:00 -0800 31, in 1950s, ballad, black music artists, male vocalist

 

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“Boz Scaggs – Look What You’ve Done To Me”

“Boz Scaggs – Look What You’ve Done To Me”

Look What You’ve Done to Me” is a 1980 song recorded by Boz Scaggs, composed by Scaggs and David Foster for the movie Urban Cowboy. It reached #14 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in November, #13 on the Cash BoxTop 100,[1] and went to #3 on the Adult Contemporary chart.[2] The song reached #30 in Canada.
The song, reflecting on a broken romance (as depicted in Urban Cowboy), features the Eagles on background vocals and instrumentation by Don Felder on guitar and members of Toto and David Foster on keyboards. Two versions of the song were released. The more widely available version of the song (as released on Scaggs greatest hits compilations) places more emphasis on the Eagles’ background vocals, plus additional background vocal stylings by Scaggs towards the end of the song. The version as heard in the Urban Cowboy film (as well as its soundtrack) replaces the Eagles’ vocals with a female chorus.

Urban Cowboy is a 1980 American romantic drama film about the love-hate relationship between Buford Uan “Bud” Davis (John Travolta) and Sissy (Debra Winger). The movie captured the late 1970s/early 1980s popularity of country music.

Bud Davis (John Travolta) moves to Houstonfor a job in the city’s oil refinery industry. He hopes to save enough money to move back to his hometown of Spur, Texas and buy some land.[4] Bud stays with his Uncle Bob (Barry Corbin) and his family, with whom Bud is close. Bob takes Bud to the local honky tonk, Gilley’s (at the time, an actual bar in Pasadena, co-owned by singer Mickey Gilleyand his record producer Sherwood Cryer). Bud quickly embraces the local nightlife there. Bud gets a job at the oil refinery where Bob works and quickly befriends his co-workers.

At the club, Bud meets Sissy (Debra Winger), who asks if he is a real cowboy. They fall in love, and soon after Bud asks Sissy to marry him. Their wedding reception is held at Gilley’s, and they immediately move into a brand new mobile home. Although they are in love and passionate, Bud and Sissy have many quarrels. Sissy is a feisty, independent woman while Bud believes in traditional gender roles. However, their lives settle into a routine of work by day and Gilley’s at night, where Bud takes a liking to riding the mechanical bull. When Sissy also wants to ride, he forbids her from doing so.

Wes Hightower (Scott Glenn), is released on parole from Huntsville Penitentiary, lands a job at Gilley’s running the mechanical bull with his old friend and Gilley’s employee Steve Strange (James Gammon). He openly flirts with Sissy, who is flattered and attracted to Wes, but a drunken Bud is enraged at the insult and ends up in a fist fight with Wes. Sissy, against Bud’s wishes, spends time at Gilley’s during the day with Wes, Steve, and her friend Jessie (Jessie La Rive) learning how to ride the mechanical bull. Meanwhile, at the refinery Bud has a serious accident and is sent home for the day. That night at Gilley’s, Jessie and Wes convince Sissy to ride the bull. She does it to impress Bud but he becomes angry and resentful that Sissy defied and lied to him and he challenges her. When Bud falls off during his second ride in that challenge, Wes intentionally swings the bull around fast, breaking Bud’s arm. At home, Bud asks Sissy if she is having an affair with Wes which she denies and Bud forbids her from riding the bull anymore. Sissy accuses Bud of being jealous because she rides the bull better than he can. Bud slaps her and throws her out of the trailer.

The next night Sissy and Bud see each other at Gilley’s but an angry Sissy refuses to talk to Bud. To make Sissy jealous, Bud introduces himself to a beautiful girl named Pam (Madolyn Smith) and dances with her, while Sissy dances with Wes. Bud and Pam leave together to have sex but Sissy, hurt and upset, declines Wes’ sexual advances. Later, Sissy moves out of Bud’s trailer and into the run-down trailer behind Gilley’s where Wes lives.

Bud wants to enter the mechanical bull riding rodeo at Gilley’s to win the $5,000 prize and starts training with his uncle Bob, a former rodeo champion. One night while working at the refinery, Bob advises Bud to swallow his pride and make up with Sissy citing his own past behavior nearly cost him his wife and children. Bob is killed that night when lightning strikes the refinery. Meanwhile, Sissy returns to their mobile home to pick up her things, but she also cleans house and leaves Bud a note saying she hopes they can get back together. Pam arrives and after Sissy leaves throws the note away. Meanwhile, Sissy arrives home and catches Wes having sex with her friend Marshalene (Connie Hanson), another Gilley’s employee. Wes orders Sissy to cook him a meal and when she, hurt at his infidelity, angrily refuses Wes becomes physically abusive.

At Bob’s funeral, Sissy tells Bud that Wes was fired from Gilley’s for hurting too many people with the mechanical bull and is unable to find another job. They plan on going to Mexico after Wes wins the $5,000 prize at the bull riding rodeo. It is Bud who wins the contest, however, and Pam, realizing that Bud still loves Sissy, admits that Sissy cleaned the trailer and that she tore up a card Sissy left for him out of jealousy. She encourages him to reconcile with Sissy. Bud leaves to find Sissy before she departs for Mexico with Wes.

Sissy refuses to go to Mexico with Wes, but relents after he hits her. He orders her to wait for him in her car behind Gilley’s. Unknown to Sissy, Wes is inside Gilley’s stealing the entry money. Bud finds Sissy in the parking lot and tells her he still loves her and apologizes for hitting her. She reciprocates and they embrace. Seeing Sissy’s bruised face, a furious Bud goes after Wes and a fight ensues at the bar entrance. The fight causes Wes to drop his gun, and the stolen money falls from his jacket. Bud overpowers Wes punching him several times and pins him down on the floor. Gilley’s staff, having discovered the robbery, apprehend Wes. Bud and Sissy, reconciled, go home together.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-02-14T10:39:54-08:00America/Los_Angeles02bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 14 Feb 2019 10:39:54 -0800 31, in 1980s, music, theme song

 

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