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“Dusty Springfield-Oh Me Oh My (i’m a fool for you baby)”

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Oh Me Oh My (I’m a Fool for You Baby)” is a Top 30 hit for Lulu which charted in 1969–70; the song has been most notably remade by Aretha Franklin and Tina Arena.

Lulu’s version

“Oh Me Oh My…” was written by Jim Doris who – as Jimmy Doris – had been vocalist-guitarist for the Stoics, a band which formed in Lulu’s native Glasgow in the late 1960s and whose membership had included Frankie Miller. Doris contributed another song to “Oh Me Oh My…”‘s parent album New Routes, entitled “After All (I Live My Life)”, and his composition “Take Good Care of Yourself” was featured on the follow-up album Melody Fair. Reportedly Doris subsequently went into A&R work before being sidelined by mental instability which factored into his being killed when run over by a bus in London in the late 1980s or early 1990s.

The advance single from Lulu’s Atco Records debut album New Routes, “Oh Me Oh My…”, was released in October 1969. A radical change of direction for Lulu, who was coming off her best ever UK chart placing at #2 with the Eurovision winner “Boom Bang-a-Bang”, the move to a more mature sound with “Oh Me Oh My…” was unappreciated in the UK where the track barely reached the Top 50. In the US, “Oh Me Oh My…” ranked as high as #4 in Birmingham, Alabama in November 1969 but nationally charted only as a moderate Easy Listening hit at #36. Several performances by Lulu on US television helped break “Oh Me Oh My…” into the Billboard Hot 100 in December 1969 and then buoy the track as it gradually gained momentum to become Lulu’s first Top 30 hit since “To Sir With Love” at the end of February 1970: “Oh Me Oh My…” would peak at #22 that March (Cash Box ranked the track with a #18 peak).

In Australia the Go-Set Top 40 chart ranked “Oh Me Oh My…” with a #33 peak in January 1970. The RPM 100 chart for Canada ranked “Oh Me Oh My…” as high as #16 in March 1970; that same month the New Zealand Listener Pop-o-meter chart ranked “Oh Me Oh My…” as high as #12.1

Lulu recorded a translated version of “Oh Me Oh My…” for release in Italy, entitled “Povera Me”; the track was released in June 1970 to no apparent attention despite a promotional junket by Lulu that July.

The only national hit parade available for New Zealand 1966–1975, the Pop-o-meter chart, did not reflect sales, rather being a poll compiled from voting coupons sent in by NZ Listener readers.

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“Robert Parker Barefootin’ …1966”

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Barefootin'” is a 1965 song performed by Robert Parker. “Barefootin'” was arranged and produced by Wardell Quezergue in 1965. The song reached No. 2 on the U.S. R&B chart and No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100. Parker’s record label claimed the record sold over one million copies.[1] The track also reached #24 in the UK Singles Chart in August 1966.[2]

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“The Young Hearts – I’ve Got Love For My Baby”

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An R&B vocal group from Los Angeles, California, USA. Original members were Ronald Preyer, Charles Ingersoll, Earl Carter, and James Moore. The Young Hearts were typical of the falsetto-lead stand-up vocal groups that populated the R&B scene of the late 60s and early 70s. Their impact was purely on the R&B charts, getting moderate hits with ‘I’ve Got Love For My Baby’ (number 19 R&B) in 1968 for the Minit subsidiary of Imperial Records, and ‘Wake Up And Start Standing’ (number 48 R&B) in 1974 for 20th Century. A stay at ABC Records in 1977 produced an album and several singles that did nothing, and the group faded after that.

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The Young Hearts ~ I’ve Got Love For My Baby:

 

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“Maybe”… Baby

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Miss Back In The DayUSA

Maybe” is a song with words and music originally credited to End Records owner George Goldner and “Casey”. The co-writing credit was later transferred to Richard Barrett. Arlene Smith, lead singer of The Chantels, is believed to be an uncredited co-writer.[citation needed] It was first recorded by the Chantels on October 16, 1957, in a doo-wopstyle with Barrett playing piano, and released in December 1957. It climbed the charts in January 1958, reaching No. 15 in the BillboardHot 100 and No. 2 in the Billboard R&B chart. It was subsequently described as “arguably, the first true glimmering of the girl groupsound”. Rolling Stone ranked it No. 199 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The song has been covered by many artists, including Janis Joplin, The Three Degrees(whose 1970 version became a top thirty hit) and The Shangri-Las. John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers has performed the song in concert, as seen on Live at Slane Castle.

The song made an appearance in the 2010 video game Mafia II, even though the game takes place in 1951 and the song was recorded in 1957.

Billboard named the song No. 60 on its list of 100 Greatest Girl Group Songs of All Time.

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“SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE – EVERYDAY PEOPLE”

Sly and the Family Stone was an American band from San Francisco. Active from 1966 to 1983, it was pivotal in the development of funk, soul, rock, and psychedelic music.
Everyday People” is a 1968 song by Sly and the Family Stone. It was the first single by the band to go to number one on the Soul singles chart and the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart.
It held that position, on the Hot 100, for four weeks from February 15 to March 14, 1969, and is remembered as a popular song of the 1960s. Billboard ranked it as the No. 5 song of 1969. As with most of Sly and the Family Stone’s songs, Sly Stone was credited as the sole songwriter.https://youtu.be/3JvkaUvB-ec

 

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“Parliament – Flashlight”

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Parliament was a funk band most prominent during the 1970s. Both Parliament and its sister act, Funkadelic, were led by George Clinton.

History

Parliament was originally The Parliaments, a doo-wop vocal group based at a Plainfield, New Jersey barbershop. The group was formed in the late 1950s and included George Clinton, Ray Davis, Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, and Grady Thomas. Clinton was the group leader and manager. The group finally had a hit single in 1967 with “(I Wanna) Testify” on Revilot Records. To capitalize, Clinton formed a backing band for a tour, featuring teenage barbershop employee Billy Bass Nelson on bass and his friend Eddie Hazel on guitar, with the lineup eventually rounded out by Tawl Ross on guitar, Tiki Fulwood on drums, and Mickey Atkins on organ.

During a contractual dispute with Revilot, Clinton temporarily lost the rights to the name “The Parliaments”, and signed the ensemble to Westbound Records as Funkadelic, which Clinton positioned as a funk-rock band featuring the five touring musicians with the five Parliaments singers as uncredited guests. With Funkadelic as a recording and touring entity in its own right, in 1970 Clinton relaunched the singing group, now known as Parliament, at first featuring the same ten members. Clinton was now the leader of two different acts, Parliament and Funkadelic, which featured the same members but were marketed as creating two different types of funk.

The Parliament album entitled Osmium was released on Invictus Records in 1970, and was later reissued on CD with non-album tracks as both Rhenium and First Thangs. Osmium featured a mostly psychedelic soul sound that was more similar to the Funkadelic albums of the period than to the later Parliament albums. The song “The Breakdown” was released separately as a single, and reached #30 on the R&B charts in 1971. Due to continuing contractual problems and the fact that Funkadelic releases were more successful at the time, Clinton abandoned the name Parliament until 1974.

Following Osmium, the lineup of Parliament-Funkadelic began going through many changes and was expanded significantly, with the addition of important members such as keyboardist Bernie Worrell in 1970, singer/guitarist Garry Shider in 1971, and bassist Bootsy Collins (recruited from the James Brown backing band) in 1972. Dozens of singers and musicians would contribute to future Parliament-Funkadelic releases. Clinton relaunched Parliament in 1974 and signed the act to Casablanca Records. Parliament, now augmented by the Horny Horns (also recruited from James Brown’s band) was positioned as a smoother R&B-based funk ensemble with intricate horn and vocal arrangements, and as a counterpoint to the guitar-based funk-rock of Funkadelic. By this point, Parliament and Funkadelic were touring as a combined entity known as Parliament-Funkadelic or simply P-Funk (which also became the catch-all term for George Clinton’s rapidly growing stable of funk artists).

The album Up for the Down Stroke was released in 1974, with Chocolate City following in 1975. Both performed strongly on the Billboard R&B charts and were moderately successful on the Pop charts. Parliament began its period of greatest mainstream success with the concept album Mothership Connection (1975), the lyrics of which launched much of the P-Funk mythology. The subsequent albums The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein (1976), Funkentelechy vs. the Placebo Syndrome (1977), and Motor Booty Affair (1978) all reached high on both the R&B and Pop charts, while Funkadelic was also experiencing significant mainstream success. Parliament scored the #1 R&B singles “Flash Light” in 1977 and “Aqua Boogie” in 1978.

The rapidly expanding ensemble of musicians and singers in the Parliament-Funkadelic enterprise, as well as Clinton’s problematic management practices, began to take their toll by the late 1970s. Original Parliaments members Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, and Grady Thomas, who had been with Clinton since the barbershop days in the late 1950s, felt marginalized by the continuous influx of new members and departed acrimoniously in 1977. Other important group members like singer/guitarist Glenn Goins and drummer Jerome Brailey left Parliament-Funkadelic in the late 1970s after disputes over Clinton’s management. Two further Parliament albums, Gloryhallastoopid (1979) and Trombipulation (1980) were less successful than the albums from the group’s prime 1975-1978 period.

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“SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE – HOT FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME”

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“Hot Fun in the Summertime” is a 1969 song recorded by Sly and the Family Stone. The single was released in the wake of the band’s high-profile performance at Woodstock, which greatly expanded their fanbase. The song peaked at number 2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart and number 3 on the U.S. Billboard soul singles chart in autumn 1969. It is ranked as the seventh biggest U.S. hit of 1969, and the 65th in Canada.

Rolling Stone ranked the song #247 on their list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”, and it also has been named in lists by Yahoo! Music and AskMen as an all-time “summer anthem.”

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