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MOBY-EXTREME WAYS

MOBY-EXTREME WAYS

Moby is an American electronic singer-songwriter known for songs like “Go” and “Porcelain,” and albums like Everything is Wrong and Play.

Synopsis

Born in New York City in 1965, Moby is an electronic singer-songwriter known for such popular songs as “Go,” “Natural Blues” and “Porcelain,” and albums like Everything is Wrong, Animal Rightsand Play. He released his ninth studio album, Wait for Me, in 2013.

Early Life

Moby was born Richard Melville Hall on September 11, 1965, in Harlem, New York. However, his parents felt that such a grand name was unsuited for such a small, fragile child, and thusly decided to call him Moby, after the eponymous whale from Herman Melville’s classic novel. In fact (and as suggested by his middle name), Herman Melville is actually Moby’s great-great-great-great uncle. “I’ve tried to read the book several times,” Moby has said of the legendary novel Moby Dick, “but I never quite got through it.”

When Moby was born, his mother, Elizabeth McBride Warner-Hall, was a student, and his father, James Hall, was a young lecturer in the chemistry department at Columbia University. Theirs was a troubled marriage and, when Moby’s father died in an alcohol-related car crash in 1967, some hypothesized that the accident was a suicide. Moby was just 2 years old when he lost his father. Soon after his father’s death, Moby’s mother, who was then only 23 years old, moved the family to Darien, Connecticut. There, Moby’s maternal grandparents helped raise him while his mother finished her college degree.

With his mother and grandmother both working full-time, Moby was often left to his own devices. “I spent a lot of time by myself,” he once said of his childhood, “and a lot of time was spent at my grandmother’s house which was rambling and old and had big overgrown gardens, so there were a lot of places to get lost and entertain myself. I am grateful that as a little boy I had lots of strange and interesting places to play.”

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“Neil Sedaka – Laughter In The Rain”

Rise to fame with RCA Victor: the late 1950s 

After graduating from Abraham Lincoln High School, Sedaka and some of his classmates formed a band called The Tokens. The band had minor regional hits with songs like “While I Dream”, “I Love My Baby”, “Come Back, Joe”, and “Don’t Go”, before Sedaka launched out on his own in 1957. Eventually, after a few personnel changes, in 1961, the Tokens hit No. 1 on the Billboard pop charts with the international smash “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”. Meanwhile, the very young Sedaka’s first three solo singles, “Laura Lee”, “Ring-a-Rockin'”, and “Oh, Delilah!” failed to become hits (although “Ring-a-Rockin'” earned him the first of many appearances on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand), but they demonstrated his ability to perform as a solo singer, so RCA Victor signed him to a recording contract.

His first single for RCA Victor, “The Diary”, was inspired by Connie Francis, one of Sedaka and Greenfield’s most important clients, while the three were taking a temporary break during their idea-making for a new song. Francis was writing in her diary, Sedaka asked if he could read it, and Connie promptly replied with a “no.” After Little Anthony and the Imperials passed on the song, Sedaka recorded it himself, and his debut single hit the Top 15 on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 14 in 1958.

However, his next two singles did not fare so well. His second single, a novelty tune titled “I Go Ape”, just missed the Top 40, peaking at No. 42 but it became a more successful single in the United Kingdom with a No. 9. The third single, “Crying My Heart Out for You”, was a commercial failure, missing the Hot 100 entirely, peaking at No. 111 but it also became a very successful single on the pop charts in Italy with a No. 6. RCA Victor had lost money on “I Go Ape” and “Crying My Heart Out For You” and was ready to drop Sedaka from their label. But Sedaka’s manager, Al Nevins, persuaded the RCA executives to give him one last chance.

Knowing he would not get another chance if he failed again, and desperate for another hit, Sedaka himself bought the three biggest hit singles of the time and listened to them repeatedly, studying the song structure, chord progressions, lyrics and harmonies—and he discovered that the hit songs of the day all shared the same basic musical anatomy. Armed with his newfound arsenal of musical knowledge, he set out to craft his next big hit song, and he promptly did exactly that: “Oh! Carol” delivered Sedaka his first domestic Top 10 hit, reaching No. 9 on the Hot 100 in 1959 and going to No. 1 on the Italian pop charts in 1960, giving Sedaka his first No. 1 ranking. In the UK, the song spent a total of 17 weeks in the top 40, peaking at No. 3 (4 weeks).[5] In addition, the B-side, “One Way Ticket”, reached No. 1 on the pop charts in Japan. Sedaka had dated Carole King when he was still at high school, which gave him the idea to use her name in the song. Gerry Goffin – King’s husband – took the tune, and wrote the playful response “Oh! Neil”, which King recorded and released as an unsuccessful single the same year.[6][7][8][9] Thus, this was the only time the melody of the song was used by a popular artist and a future sensation around the same time.

Big hits in the early 1960s 

After establishing himself in 1958, Sedaka kept churning out new hits from 1960 to 1962. His flow of Top 30 hits during this period included: “Stairway to Heaven” (No. 9, 1960); “You Mean Everything to Me” (No. 17, 1960); “Run, Samson, Run” (No. 27, 1960); “Calendar Girl” (No. 4, 1961; also reached No. 1 on the Japanese and Canadian pop charts); “Little Devil” (No. 11, 1961); “Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen” (No. 6, 1961); his signature song, “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do” (No. 1, two weeks: August 11 and 18, 1962); and “Next Door to an Angel” (No. 5, 1962). Singles not making the Top 30 during this period included “Sweet Little You” (No. 59, 1961) and “King of Clowns” (No. 45, 1962). RCA Victor issued four LPs of his works in the United States and Great Britain during this period, and also produced Scopitone and Cinebox videos of “Calendar Girl” in 1961, “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do” in 1962, and “The Dreamer” in 1963. (His second LP was the only one made in the big band style with songs combined in a single record.) He made regular appearances on such TV programs as American Bandstand and Shindig! during this period.

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https://youtu.be/SsYIiY2wnyU

 

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“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

George Alan O’Dowd (born 14 June 1961), known professionally as Boy George, is an English singer, songwriter, DJ, fashion designer and photographer. He is the lead singer of the Grammy and Brit Award-winning pop band Culture Club. At the height of the band’s fame, during the 1980s, they recorded global hit songs such as “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”, “Time (Clock of the Heart)” and “Karma Chameleon” and George was known for his soulful voice and androgynous appearance. He was part of the English New Romantic movement which emerged in the late 1970s to the early 1980s.

His music is often classified as blue-eyed soul, which is influenced by rhythm and blues and reggae. He was lead singer of Jesus Loves You during the period 1989–1992. His 1990s and 2000s-era solo music has glam influences, such as David Bowie and Iggy Pop. More recently, he has released fewer music recordings, splitting his time between songwriting, DJing, writing books, designing clothes and photography.

Boy George – Do You Really Want To Hurt Me Lyrics

Give me time
To release my crime
Let me love and steal
I have danced
Inside your eyes
How can love be real
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Precious kisses
Words that burn me
Lovers never ask you why
In my heart
The fires burning
Choose my colour
Find a star
Precious people always tell me
That’s a step
A step too far
*Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Words are few
I have spoken
I could waste a thousand years
Wrapped in sorrow
Words are token
Come inside/and catch my tears
You’ve been talking
But believe me
If it’s true
You do not know
This boy loves without a reason
I’m prepared
To let you go
If it’s love you want from me
Then take it away
Everything is not what you see
It’s over again

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/boy+george/do+you+really+want+to+hurt+me_20192555.html

“Do You Really Want to Hurt Me” is a song written and recorded by the British new wave band Culture Club. Released as a single in September 1982 from the group’s platinum-selling debut album Kissing to Be Clever, it was the band’s first UK #1 hit. In the United States, the single was released in November 1982 and also became a huge hit, reaching #2 for three weeks.

en.m.Wikipedia.com

 

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“Chicago- Make Me Smile”

“Chicago- Make Me Smile”

“Make Me Smile” is a song written by James Pankow for the rock band Chicago with the band’s guitarist, Terry Kath, on lead vocals. Part 1 of Pankow’s 7-part Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon song cycle/suite, it was recorded for their second album, Chicago (often called Chicago II), which was released in 1970.
Background

A radio-friendly edit of “Make Me Smile” (incorporating the end of “Now More Than Ever,” the final track from the Ballet) was released as a single in March 1970, becoming the band’s first Top 10 record, peaking at number nine on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart.[1] When

Chicago

released their compilation album The Very Best of: Only the Beginning in 2002, they featured a new edit of the song, with the

“Make Me Smile”

and “Now More Than Ever” parts segued together again, but without the numerous cuts—the full intro and the guitar solo of the former part, and the full outro of the latter part, were thus included.

Since the death of Terry Kath in 1978, the vocals for live performances of “Make Me Smile” were handled by Bill Champlin, who joined the band for the recording of Chicago 16, until he departed the group in August 2009. On shows that Champlin did not attend, Robert Lamm sang the lead vocal. Champlin’s replacement Lou Pardini has now taken over the singing of “Make Me Smile”.

en.m.Wikipedia.com

 

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“I Like Dreaming – Kenny Nolan”

image

At the age of 13 he won a scholarship to the University of Southern California for Musical composition, but dropped out after six months, bored with the conventional regimen. Four years later, a scholarship to Chouinard went the same way, and Nolan decided to send songs in to any artist he thought might be suitable. It brought him to the attention of both veteran songwriter Crewe and entrepreneur Wes Farrell, both of whom harnessed the then youngster’s talent.

As house producer at Farrell’s Chelsea label, Nolan wrote and/or produced a string of successful singles for the label, including Jim Gilstrap’s “Swing Your Daddy” and “Take Your Daddy for a Ride,” Dee Clark’s “Ride a Wild Horse,” and Linda Carr’s “High Wire.” With Crewe, meanwhile, he co-wrote some of the era’s biggest successes. These included Disco Tex & The Sex-O-Lette’s “Get Dancing,” LaBelle’s “Lady Marmalade,” and Frankie Valli’s “My Eyes Adored You.” He wrote the song Flirtin’ for the 1971 (The Donny Osmond Album),” as well as the final Top 40 hit for Tavares in 1982, entitled “A Penny For Your Thoughts.”

Nolan also had ambition to perform – it was he who supplied the falsetto that dominated “Get Dancing” – and, after a short tenure with Firefly, he moved onto the studio group The Eleventh Hour. Produced by Crewe, the band scored two minor hits in the U.S. with “So Good” (1974) and “Hollywood Hot”, the following year; and the minor hit album, Hollywood Hot (1976).

In 1976, Nolan decided to record his own version of a song he had been commissioned to write by another. “I Like Dreamin'” was released by the Eleventh Hour’s label, 20th Century, and in early November it finally entered the U.S. chart, to begin a three-month crawl to its peak at number three.

Nolan followed it the following spring with the Top 20 hit “Love’s Grown Deep”, taken from his self-titled album, and was named Number One New Pop Singles Artist of 1977 by Billboard magazine. “My Eyes Get Blurry” followed, plus Nolan’s next album, 1978’s A Song Between Us. Night Miracles followed two years later, bringing a new single, “Us and Love (We Go Together)”, to the mid-reaches of the chart in early 1980, but failing to give Nolan any further, major success.

He continued to record, however, signing to MCA and releasing Head to Toe in 1982. That album produced two singles, “Love Song” and “Soft Rock Hard Love,” but further commercial success as a recording artist eluded him. However, he continued to write songs that became hits for other artists, including “Shoot ‘Em Up Movies”, which became a top ten R&B hit for soul/boogie band The Deele in 1988.

In the 1990s he wrote “Masterpiece” which became a crossover hit for another soul band, Atlantic Starr.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Sailing by Christopher Cross”

“Sailing by Christopher Cross”

Christopher Cross (born Christopher Charles Geppert; May 3, 1951) is an American singer-songwriter from San Antonio, Texas. His debut album earned him five Grammy Awards. He is perhaps best known for his US Top Ten hit songs, “Ride Like the Wind”, “Sailing”, and “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)”, the latter recorded by him for the film Arthur starring Dudley Moore.[1][2] “Sailing” earned three Grammys in 1981, while “Arthur’s Theme” won the Oscar for Best Original Song in 1981 (with co-composers Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, and Peter Allen).

Career

Early musical career
Cross first played with a San Antonio-based cover band named Flash (not to be confused with the early 1970s English band of the same name) before signing a solo contract with Warner Bros. in 1978.[3]

The first album, and immediate success
Cross released his self-titled debut album, Christopher Cross, in 1979. The Billboard Hot 100 top 20 hits from this album included “Ride Like the Wind” (featuring backing vocals by Michael McDonald), “Sailing”, “Never Be the Same”, and “Say You’ll Be Mine” (featuring backing vocals by Nicolette Larson). Due to the almost immediate success and popularity gained by his first album, he was nominated for several Grammy Awards, garnering him five.

He also made Grammy history by winning all four General Field Grammy awards (Record of the Year, Album of the Year, Song of the Year and Best New Artist) in the same year. To date, he is the only artist to have won those four awards in the same year. He also won a fifth for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s), sharing this award with producer and co-arranger Michael Omartian for the song “Sailing.”

The second album
Cross’s second album, Another Page (1983), included the hit songs “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” (on the CD & cassette versions only, as a bonus song), “All Right”, “No Time for Talk”, and “Think of Laura”. “All Right” was used by CBS Sports for its highlights montage following the 1983 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Tournament, while “Think of Laura” is used as a reference to characters on the soap opera General Hospital. Another Page sold well, getting Gold Certification. He also co-wrote and sang the song “A Chance For Heaven” for the 1984 Summer Olympic Games.

The curse of the MTV generation Edit
After 1984, Cross’ star quickly dimmed. As music television station MTV grew to dominate the mainstream music scene in the U.S., Cross’ physical appearance and style of music proved to be “a bad fit” for the network, and Cross’ brand of adult contemporary music declined in popularity.[4]

Cross’ next two albums, 1985’s Every Turn of the World and 1988’s Back of My Mind did not produce any top 40 hits and did not sell as well as his first two albums.[citation needed]

The 1990s
Cross made three more albums in the 1990s, and although some of his releases have gained critical response, he has not been able to attract the mass audience he once enjoyed. After his decline in fame in the mid-1980s, he toured and opened for various acts during the 1990s.[5][6]

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“Use Me – Bill Withers”

“Use Me – Bill Withers”

Sussex records
During early 1970, Withers’ demonstration tape was auditioned favorably by Clarence Avant, owner of Sussex Records. Avant signed Withers to a record deal and assigned former Stax Records stalwart Booker T. Jones to produce Withers’ first album. Four three-hour studio sessions were planned to record the album, but funding caused the album to be recorded in three sessions with a six-month break between the second and final sessions. Just as I Am was released in 1971 with the tracks, “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Grandma’s Hands” as singles. The album features Stephen Stills playing lead guitar.[5]

The album was a success and Withers began touring with a band assembled from members of The Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band: drummer James Gadson, guitarist Benorce Blackmon, keyboardist Ray Jackson, and bassist Melvin Dunlap.

At the 14th annual Grammy Awards on Tuesday, March 14, 1972, Withers won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Song for “Ain’t No Sunshine.” The track had already sold over one million copies and was awarded a platinum disc by the RIAA in September 1971.[6]

During a hiatus from touring, Withers recorded his second album, Still Bill. The single, “Lean on Me” went to number one the week of July 8, 1972. It was Withers’ second gold single with confirmed sales in excess of three million.[6] His follow-up, “Use Me” released in August 1972, became his third million seller, with the R.I.A.A. gold disc award taking place on October 12, 1972.[6] His performance at Carnegie Hall on October 6, 1972, was recorded, and released as the live album Bill Withers, Live at Carnegie Hall on November 30, 1972. In 1974, Withers recorded the album +’Justments. Due to a legal dispute with the Sussex company, Withers was unable to record for some time thereafter.

During this time, he wrote and produced two songs on the Gladys Knight & the Pips record I Feel a Song, and in October 1974 performed in concert together with James Brown, Etta James, and B. B. King four weeks prior to the historic Rumble in the Jungle fight between Foreman and Ali in Zaire.[7] Footage of his performance was included in the 1996 documentary film When We Were Kings, and he is heard on the accompanying soundtrack. Other footage of his performance is included in the 2008 documentary film Soul Power which is based on archival footage of the 1974 Zaire concert.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Use Me – Bill Withers (1972)”

 

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