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Category Archives: male vocalist

“Justin Bieber – Company” 

Company” is a song by Canadian singer Justin Bieber from his fourth studio album Purpose (2015). Written by Bieber, Jason “Poo Bear” BoydJames AbrahartAndreas SchullerThomas Troelsen, James Wong and Leroy Clampitt, the song was produced by Axident, Gladius, Big Taste and co-produced by Boyd. It was released to American rhythmic contemporary and contemporary hit radio stations on March 8, 2016 as the album’s fourth single. It is an electropop and R&B song, with bass guitarguitar and percussion in its instrumentation. Lyrically, “Company” talks about looking forward to getting to know someone attractive, but also sets some healthy boundaries for doing so.

As an album track, it reached the top-forty in the majority of the countries it charted. When it was released as a single, the song managed to reach the top-forty in Australia and peaked at number 53 in the United States. Bieber performed the track on the 3rd iHeartRadio Music Awards and 2016 Billboard Music Awards, as well as on his Purpose World Tour. Two music videos were made for the song: the video which is part of the “Purpose: The Movement” narrative and released on November 14, 2015, and the official music video released on June 8, 2016.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-21T12:45:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 21 Jun 2018 12:45:00 +0000 31, in male vocalist, music

 

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“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

“BOY GEORGE – DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME”

George Alan O’Dowd (born 14 June 1961), known professionally as Boy George, is an English singer, songwriter, DJ, fashion designer and photographer. He is the lead singer of the Grammy and Brit Award-winning pop band Culture Club. At the height of the band’s fame, during the 1980s, they recorded global hit songs such as “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”, “Time (Clock of the Heart)” and “Karma Chameleon” and George was known for his soulful voice and androgynous appearance. He was part of the English New Romantic movement which emerged in the late 1970s to the early 1980s.

His music is often classified as blue-eyed soul, which is influenced by rhythm and blues and reggae. He was lead singer of Jesus Loves You during the period 1989–1992. His 1990s and 2000s-era solo music has glam influences, such as David Bowie and Iggy Pop. More recently, he has released fewer music recordings, splitting his time between songwriting, DJing, writing books, designing clothes and photography.

Boy George – Do You Really Want To Hurt Me Lyrics

Give me time
To release my crime
Let me love and steal
I have danced
Inside your eyes
How can love be real
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Precious kisses
Words that burn me
Lovers never ask you why
In my heart
The fires burning
Choose my colour
Find a star
Precious people always tell me
That’s a step
A step too far
*Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Do you really want to hurt me
Do you really want to
Make me cry
Words are few
I have spoken
I could waste a thousand years
Wrapped in sorrow
Words are token
Come inside/and catch my tears
You’ve been talking
But believe me
If it’s true
You do not know
This boy loves without a reason
I’m prepared
To let you go
If it’s love you want from me
Then take it away
Everything is not what you see
It’s over again

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/boy+george/do+you+really+want+to+hurt+me_20192555.html

“Do You Really Want to Hurt Me” is a song written and recorded by the British new wave band Culture Club. Released as a single in September 1982 from the group’s platinum-selling debut album Kissing to Be Clever, it was the band’s first UK #1 hit. In the United States, the single was released in November 1982 and also became a huge hit, reaching #2 for three weeks.

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-21T11:45:15+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 21 Jun 2018 11:45:15 +0000 31, in male vocalist, pop music, uk

 

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“You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine”

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Louis Allen “Lou” Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006) was an American recording artist, voice actor, songwriter, and record producer. He is best known for his singing ability: Frank Sinatra once said that Rawls had “the classiest singing and silkiest chops in the singing game”.[1] Rawls released more than 60 albums, sold more than 40 million records,[2] and had numerous charting singles, most notably his song “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine”. He worked as a television, motion picture, and voice actor. He was also a three-time Grammy-winner, all for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance.

Career

Rawls was born in Chicago on December 1, 1933, and raised by his grandmother in the Ida B. Wells projects on the city’s South Side. He began singing in the Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church choir at the age of seven and later sang with local groups through which he met future music stars Sam Cooke, who was nearly three years older than Rawls, and Curtis Mayfield.[3]

After graduating from Chicago’s Dunbar Vocational High School, he sang briefly with Cooke in the Teenage Kings of Harmony, a local gospel group, and then with the Holy Wonders. In 1951, Rawls replaced Cooke in the Highway QC’s after Cooke departed to join The Soul Stirrers in Los Angeles. Rawls was soon recruited by the Chosen Gospel Singers and moved to Los Angeles, where he subsequently joined the Pilgrim Travelers.[4]

In 1955, Rawls enlisted in the United States Army as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He left the “All-Americans” three years later as a sergeant and rejoined the Pilgrim Travelers (then known as the Travelers). In 1958, while touring the South with the Travelers and Sam Cooke, Rawls was in a serious car crash. Rawls was pronounced dead before arriving at the hospital, where he stayed in a coma for five and a half days. It took him months to regain his memory, and a year to fully recuperate. Rawls considered the event to be life-changing.[4]

Alongside Dick Clark as master of ceremonies, Rawls was recovered enough by 1959 to be able to perform at the Hollywood Bowl. He was signed to Capitol Records in 1962, the same year he sang the soulful background vocals on the Sam Cooke recording of “Bring It On Home to Me” and “That’s Where It’s At,” both written by Cooke. Rawls himself charted with a cover of “Bring It On Home to Me” in 1970 (with the title shortened to “Bring It On Home”).

Rawls’ first Capitol solo release was Stormy Monday (a.k.a. I’d Rather Drink Muddy Water), a jazz album with Les McCann in 1962. The next two Capitol releases did well and used Onzy Matthews as the musical director along with a 17-piece big band; both these albums (Black and Blue, Tobacco Road) charted with Billboard and helped to propel him into the national spotlight as a recording artist.

Though his 1966 album Live! went gold, Rawls would not have a star-making hit until he made a proper soul album, appropriately named Soulin’, later that same year. The album contained his first R&B #1 single, “Love Is a Hurtin’ Thing”. In 1967 Rawls won his first Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance, for the single “Dead End Street.” In 1967, Rawls also performed at the first evening of the Monterey International Pop Music Festival.[6]

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Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-21T09:24:30+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 21 Jun 2018 09:24:30 +0000 31, in ballad, black music artists, blues, coffee, entertainment, male vocalist, music, r&b, smooth jazz, soul oldies

 

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“Bob Seger – If I Were A Carpenter”

“Bob Seger – If I Were A Carpenter”

If I Were a Carpenter” is a song written by Tim Hardin. Hardin’s own recording of the piece appeared on his 1967 album Tim Hardin 2. It was one of two songs from that release (the other being “‘Misty Roses“) performed by Hardin at Woodstock

Cover versions
In 1966, it was a Top Ten hit for Bobby Darin, reaching number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] Bobby Darin also had an album If I Were A Carpenter, which contained the song.

  • In 1967 Joan Baez covered a gender-reversed version on her album Joan, initially renamed If You Were a Carpenterthough later compilations reverted to the original title.[3]
  • In 1968, The Four Tops hit the Top 20 on both the pop and soul charts with their version.[4] It also reached number eight in the UK charts in 1968 staying in the charts for 11 weeks.[5] It reached number four in the Netherlands.[6]
  • In 1970 a duet by Johnny Cash and June Carter went to number 2 on the country chart.[7]
  • In 1972, a cover by Bob Segerreached number 76 on the Billboard Hot 100.[8] The single was released from his album Smokin’ O.P.’s.[9]
  • According to the Discogs encyclopedia the song appears on 2287 singles, LPs or CDs. [10]
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    Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-19T10:48:05+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 19 Jun 2018 10:48:05 +0000 31, in American music artists, classic music, male vocalist

     

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    “Billy Stewart – I DO LOVE YOU”

    Billy Stewart (March 24, 1937 – January 17, 1970) was an American musical artist, with a highly distinctive scat-singing style, who enjoyed popularity in the 1960s.

    Biography

    Stewart was 12 years old when he began singing with his younger brothers Johnny, James, and Frank as The 4 Stewart Brothers, and later went on to get their own radio show every Sunday for five years at WUST-AM in Washington, D.C.

    Stewart made the transition to secular music by filling in occasionally for The Rainbows, a D.C. area vocal group led by the future soul star, Don Covay. It was also through The Rainbows that Stewart met another aspiring singer, Marvin Gaye. Rock and roller Bo Diddley has been credited with discovering Stewart playing piano in Washington, D.C. in 1956 and inviting him to be one of his backup musicians.[citation needed]

    This led to a recording contract with Diddley’s label, Chess Records and Diddley played guitar on Stewart’s 1956 recording of “Billy’s Blues”. A strong seller in Los Angeles, “Billy’s Blues” reached the sales top 25 in Variety magazine. Stewart then moved to Okeh Records and recorded “Billy’s Heartache”, backed by the Marquees, another D.C. area group which featured Marvin Gaye.

    Back at Chess in the early 1960s, Stewart began working with A&amp;R man Billy Davis. He recorded a song called “Fat Boy” and then had additional success with his recordings of “Reap What You Sow” and “Strange Feeling”, both making the Billboard Hot 100 and the Top 30 in the R&amp;B charts. Major chart success was not far away and in 1965, Stewart recorded two self-written songs, “<h2>I Do Love You” </h2>(#6 R&amp;B, #26 Pop), which featured his brother Johnny Stewart as one of the backing vocalists with his partner James English, and “Sitting in the Park” (#4 R&amp;B, #24 Pop). His idiosyncratic improvisational technique of doubling-up, scatting his words and trilling his lips made his style unique in the 1960s.[citation needed]

    In 1966, Stewart recorded the LP Unbelievable. The first single released from that album was Stewart’s radical interpretation of the George Gershwin song, “Summertime”, a Top 10 hit on both the pop and R&amp;B charts. The follow-up single was Stewart’s cover version of the Doris Day hit “Secret Love”, which reached the Pop Top 30 and just missed the Top 10 on the R&amp;B chart.

    Stewart continued to record throughout the remainder of the 1960s on Chess without major success. A weight problem worsened, and he developed diabetes. Stewart suffered minor injuries in a motorcycle accident in 1969.

    Death

    Stewart died in a car accident the following January in 1970, just two months prior to his 33rd birthday. The accident happened when the Ford Thunderbird that Stewart was driving approached a bridge across the Neuse River. Stewart’s car left the highway, ran along the median strip at a slight angle to the highway, struck the bridge curbing, and plunged into the river, killing Stewart and his three passengers instantly. The car had been purchased only 12 days before and had been driven only 1,400 miles before the accident occurred.

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    Posted by on TueAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-19T09:19:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesTue, 19 Jun 2018 09:19:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, male vocalist

     

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    “Werewolves Of London”

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    “Werewolves of London” is a rock song composed by LeRoy Marinell, Waddy Wachtel, and Warren Zevon and performed by Zevon. Included on Zevon’s 1978 album Excitable Boy, it featured accompaniment by drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie of Fleetwood Mac. The single was released by Asylum Records as catalog number 45472. It entered the American Top 40 charts on April 22, 1978, reaching number 21, and remained in the Top 40 for six weeks.

    According to Wachtel, “Werewolves of London” was “the hardest song to get down in the studio I’ve ever worked on.”[1] However, Wachtel “laid down his solo in one take, before he’d even had a chance to partake of the bump of coke and drink he’d placed in front of him.”[2] According to Jackson Browne (who was the producer for the recording), “Werewolves of London” along with “Excitable Boy” were written while work was being done on the album that preceded Excitable Boy but were not included on that album in favor of other songs.[3] The song is in the key of G major, with a three-chord progression that runs throughout.[4]

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    Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-18T11:30:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 18 Jun 2018 11:30:00 +0000 31, in coffee, entertainment, male vocalist, music

     

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    “Suspicious Mind – Elvis Presley”

    Suspicious Minds” is a song written and first recorded by American songwriter Mark James. After James’ recording failed commercially, the song was handed to Elvis Presley by producer Chips Moman, becoming a number one song in 1969, and one of the most notable hits of Presley’s career. “Suspicious Minds” was widely regarded as the single that returned Presley’s career success, following his ’68 Comeback Special. It was his eighteenth and last number-onesingle in the United States. Rolling Stoneranked it No. 91 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[5] Session guitarist Reggie Young played on both the James and Presley versions.

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    Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-18T10:00:36+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 18 Jun 2018 10:00:36 +0000 31, in classic music, male vocalist, 1970s

     

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