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Category Archives: male vocalist

“Bobby HOLCOMB & Angélo NEUFFER – Huahine Te Tiara’a”

“Bobby HOLCOMB & Angélo NEUFFER – Huahine Te Tiara’a”

Holcomb is a French polynesian reggae,  folk artist.

Bobby was born in 1947 in Honolulu, Hawaii, from a hawaiian-portuguese mother and a native indian afro-american father. … In year 1976 Bobby arrives in Tahiti islands where he decides to settle in the island of Huahine. Early 80s he starts being known as a singer.

“HUAHINE te Tiara’a …”
Bobby Holcomb. Bobby is the emblematic and quasi mythical singer-songwriter of today’s Huahine. Deceased a little the sound (hawaiian and the melancholy of the song of the words return today to the ear and in the mouth of the most of the Tahitians.) Here are the words of this song dedicated to Huahine, the island of adoption From this artist: 

Huahine te tiara’a O te mata te toerau e Huahine, hua hua Tearu E marama Pupu fati fati Huahine Maro te heva bis Huahine Huahine elancolia.

Holcomb never signed with a major label, and his early music was mostly produced on cassettes. The albums that did make their way to compact disc are out of print, and used copies are very rare. Tahitian television made some videos of Holcomb performing his tunes in the 1980s, and some of those videos can be found on the internet, on sites such as YouTube.

Not sure but “Huahine Te Tiara’a” Song sounds like  “How Many Roads Must A Man Walk Down” 

 

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“Cat Stevens – Moon Shadow (1970)”

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“Moonshadow” is a song from the album Teaser and the Firecat, released by Cat Stevens in 1971. Stevens, who is now known as Yusuf Islam, considers this his favourite of his old songs. It is one of the songs that convinced him to release a Greatest Hits record of his work as Cat Stevens. He felt its uplifting message could help people.[1]

When Yusuf appeared on The Chris Isaak Hour in 2009, he said of this song: “I was on a holiday in Spain. I was a kid from the West End (of London) – bright lights, et cetera. I never got to see the moon on its own in the dark, there were always streetlamps. So there I was on the edge of the water on a beautiful night with the moon glowing, and suddenly I looked down and saw my shadow. I thought that was so cool, I’d never seen it before.”

An animated short featuring the song was part of the Fantastic Animation Festival feature film released in 1977.[2] The animation begins with a still frame of Teaser and his pet Firecat, pictured as they appear on the cover of the album bearing their names. The picture comes to life, and in the course of the animation, they find the fallen Moon, ride on it as it flies, and find a way to replace it in the sky. The beginning and ending story portions were written by Cat Stevens and narrated by Spike Milligan.[2] The video also appears as a special feature on the Majikat Concert DVD.[3]

In May 2012, Moonshadow, a new musical by Yusuf, featuring music from throughout his career, opened at the Princess Theatre in Melbourne, Australia. The show received mixed reviews and closed four weeks early.[4][5]

The song appears as “Moon Shadow” on both the UK and US labels of the single release.

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Posted by on April 24, 2017 in 1970s, male vocalist

 

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“I Like Dreaming – Kenny Nolan”

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At the age of 13 he won a scholarship to the University of Southern California for Musical composition, but dropped out after six months, bored with the conventional regimen. Four years later, a scholarship to Chouinard went the same way, and Nolan decided to send songs in to any artist he thought might be suitable. It brought him to the attention of both veteran songwriter Crewe and entrepreneur Wes Farrell, both of whom harnessed the then youngster’s talent.

As house producer at Farrell’s Chelsea label, Nolan wrote and/or produced a string of successful singles for the label, including Jim Gilstrap’s “Swing Your Daddy” and “Take Your Daddy for a Ride,” Dee Clark’s “Ride a Wild Horse,” and Linda Carr’s “High Wire.” With Crewe, meanwhile, he co-wrote some of the era’s biggest successes. These included Disco Tex & The Sex-O-Lette’s “Get Dancing,” LaBelle’s “Lady Marmalade,” and Frankie Valli’s “My Eyes Adored You.” He wrote the song Flirtin’ for the 1971 (The Donny Osmond Album),” as well as the final Top 40 hit for Tavares in 1982, entitled “A Penny For Your Thoughts.”

Nolan also had ambition to perform – it was he who supplied the falsetto that dominated “Get Dancing” – and, after a short tenure with Firefly, he moved onto the studio group The Eleventh Hour. Produced by Crewe, the band scored two minor hits in the U.S. with “So Good” (1974) and “Hollywood Hot”, the following year; and the minor hit album, Hollywood Hot (1976).

In 1976, Nolan decided to record his own version of a song he had been commissioned to write by another. “I Like Dreamin'” was released by the Eleventh Hour’s label, 20th Century, and in early November it finally entered the U.S. chart, to begin a three-month crawl to its peak at number three.

Nolan followed it the following spring with the Top 20 hit “Love’s Grown Deep”, taken from his self-titled album, and was named Number One New Pop Singles Artist of 1977 by Billboard magazine. “My Eyes Get Blurry” followed, plus Nolan’s next album, 1978’s A Song Between Us. Night Miracles followed two years later, bringing a new single, “Us and Love (We Go Together)”, to the mid-reaches of the chart in early 1980, but failing to give Nolan any further, major success.

He continued to record, however, signing to MCA and releasing Head to Toe in 1982. That album produced two singles, “Love Song” and “Soft Rock Hard Love,” but further commercial success as a recording artist eluded him. However, he continued to write songs that became hits for other artists, including “Shoot ‘Em Up Movies”, which became a top ten R&B hit for soul/boogie band The Deele in 1988.

In the 1990s he wrote “Masterpiece” which became a crossover hit for another soul band, Atlantic Starr.

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“So Happy Together – The Turtles”

“So Happy Together – The Turtles”

“Happy Together” is a 1967 song from The Turtles’ album of the same name. Released in February 1967, the song knocked The Beatles’ “Penny Lane” out of the number one slot for three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100.[1] It was the group’s only chart-topper. “Happy Together” reached number 12 on the UK Singles Chart in April 1967.[2] The song was written by Garry Bonner and Alan Gordon, former members of a band known as The Magicians.[1] The song had been rejected a dozen times before it was offered to The Turtles, and the demo acetate was worn out.[3]

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“Paul Davis- I go crazy”

“Paul Davis- I go crazy”

“I Go Crazy” is a song written, composed, and recorded by American singer-songwriter Paul Davis. It was the first single he released from his 1977 album Singer of Songs: Teller of Tales, and his second-highest peaking pop hit, peaking at #7 on the Billboard chart in 1978. Inspired by a brief stay in the Bellevue psychiatric ward, the song entered the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart on 27 August 1977 and began slowly climbing, peaking in March and April 1978, before dropping off the chart the week after 27 May 1978. Overall, it spent 40 weeks (nine months and one week) on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, setting what was then the record for the longest run on that chart, of consecutive weeks or not.[1]

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“Blood, Sweat & Tears – Spinning Wheel (album version)”

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“Spinning Wheel” is the title of a popular song from 1969 by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. The song was written by the band’s Canadian lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas and appears on their self-titled album.

Released as a single in 1969, “Spinning Wheel” peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in July of that year, remaining in the runner-up position for three weeks.[1] In August of that year, the song topped the Billboard easy listening chart for two weeks.[2] It was also a crossover hit, reaching #45 on the US R&B chart.

“Spinning Wheel” was nominated for three Grammy Awards at the 1970 ceremony, winning in the category Best Instrumental Arrangement. The arranger for the song was the band’s saxophonist, Fred Lipsius. It was nominated for Record of the Year and Song of the Year; the album won the Grammy for Album of the Year.

Clayton-Thomas was quoted as describing the song as being “written in an age when psychedelic imagery was all over lyrics…it was my way of saying, ‘Don’t get too caught up, because everything comes full circle’.”[2]

The song ends with the 1815 Austrian tune “O Du Lieber Augustin” (“The More We Get Together” or “Did You Ever See a Lassie?”)[citation needed] and drummer Bobby Colomby’s comment: “That wasn’t too good”, followed by laughter from the rest of the group. According to producer James William Guercio this section was added in at the last minute after the end of the master tape was recorded over accidentally by an engineer at the studio. Most of this section and the trumpet solo were edited out for the single version. The eight-bar piano solo which precedes the trumpet solo on the album version is overlapped with guitar on the single version before the last verse.

Among artists who have covered “Spinning Wheel” are Shirley Bassey, who included the song on her 1970 album Something, and Nancy Wilson, who covered it in the Hawaii Five-O episode “Trouble in Mind,” which originally aired September 23, 1970. In 1970 Marianne Mendt released a version of the tune in Austria, as “A g’scheckert’s Hutschpferd” and Barbara Eden performed a live version [3] that aired in the U.S. Jazz organist Dr. Lonnie Smith recorded an extended instrumental version for his 1970 Blue Note album Drives.[4] James Brown scored a minor hit in 1971 with an instrumental version of the song, reaching #90 on the Billboard Hot 100.[5][6] The Canadian a cappella music group, Cadence also covered this song. In 1970 P.P. Arnold recorded a version produced by Barry Gibb but it was not released. An instrumental rendition of this song was used as a cue on the first Wheel of Fortune pilot titled Shopper’s Bazaar.

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 “Dan Hill – Sometimes When We Touch”

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Daniel Grafton “Dan” Hill IV[1][2] (born 3 June 1954) is a Canadian pop singer and songwriter. He had two major international hits with his songs “Sometimes When We Touch” and “Can’t We Try”, a duet with Vonda Shepard, as well as a number of other charting singles in Canada and the United States.

Sometimes When We Touch” is a 1977 ballad written by Dan Hill (lyrics) and Barry Mann (music) on the album Longer Fuse, but was also released as a single in 1978. It was Hill’s biggest hit, peaking at # 3 on the United States Billboard Hot 100 and #10 on the Easy Listening chart.[2] Musicians included Bobby Ogdin (piano), Larrie Londin (drums), Bob Mann (guitar), Don Potter (guitar), Tom Szczesniak (bass). The record was produced by Fred Mollin and Matthew McCauley, recorded at Manta Sound, Toronto.

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Posted by on April 17, 2017 in 1970s, male vocalist, music

 

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