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Category Archives: male vocal group

“Pick Up The Pieces – Average White Band (1974)”

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Average White Band (also AWB) are a Scottish funk and R&B band that had a series of soul and disco hits between 1974 and 1980. They are best known for their million-selling instrumental track “Pick Up the Pieces”, and their albums AWB and Cut the Cake. The band name was initially proposed by Bonnie Bramlett. They have influenced others such as the Brand New Heavies, and been sampled by various musicians including the Beastie Boys, TLC, The Beatnuts, Too Short, Ice Cube, Eric B. & Rakim, Nas, and A Tribe Called Quest, as well as Arrested Development[1] – making them the fifteenth most sampled act in history.[2] As of 2012, forty years after their formation, they continue to perform.

Career

AWB was formed in early 1972[3] by Alan Gorrie,[4] and Malcolm “Molly” Duncan, with Onnie McIntyre,[5] Michael Rosen (trumpet), Roger Ball, and Robbie McIntosh[6] joining them in the original line-up. Hamish Stuart[7] quickly replaced Rosen. Duncan and Ball, affectionately known as the Dundee Horns, studied at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art (now part of the University of Dundee, but which at the time was part of the Dundee Institute of Art & Technology, now known as Abertay University), and were previously members of Mogul Thrash. Gorrie and McIntyre had been members of Forever More. McIntyre and McIntosh were used as session musicians on Chuck Berry’s recording of “My Ding-a-Ling”.[3]

The band’s breakthrough was a support slot at Eric Clapton’s comeback concert in 1973. MCA Records released their debut album, Show Your Hand (1973), which sold poorly.[8] Bruce McCaskill, who was Clapton’s tour manager, liked the band’s music and agreed to manage them. He borrowed money to take them to the US and to promote them. McCaskill had many contacts from his days with Clapton and managed to get Atlantic Records to sign them. The band relocated to Los Angeles and released the follow-up, AWB, better known as The White Album. It reached #1 and was the first of many with renowned producer Arif Mardin.[8]

McIntosh died of a heroin overdose at a Los Angeles party on 23 September 1974.[1][8] Gorrie also overdosed, but Cher kept him conscious until medical help arrived.[9] The NME reported in January 1975 that AWB played a benefit show for McIntosh’s widow at the Marquee Club in London.[10] McIntosh was replaced by Steve Ferrone (previously of Bloodstone), and, like McIntosh, previously with Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express.[1]

In 1975, the single “Pick Up the Pieces” – taken from the No. 1 AWB album – reached No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song knocked Linda Ronstadt’s “You’re No Good” out of No. 1 and sold over one million copies. It was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in March 1975.[11] It also prompted The J.B.’s, the backup band of the “Godfather of Soul”, James Brown, to record and release a song in reply, “Pick Up the Pieces, One by One”, under the name AABB (Above Average Black Band). It was both a tribute to AWB’s knowledge of funk and a tongue-in-cheek play on the Scottish band’s name.

AWB followed up with the LPs Cut the Cake (1975) and Soul Searching (1976), both big sellers and yielding further Top 40 singles. Cut the Cake was dedicated by the surviving band members to McIntosh’s memory. Their next LP, Benny & Us, was a collaboration with Ben E. King.[8]

After several more albums, AWB’s audience and sales dwindled. Their 1980 disco hit “Let’s Go Round Again” (UK #12),[12] was covered in the late 1990s by Louise. The group initially disbanded by 1983.

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 “Ace – How Long” 

 “Ace –  How Long” 

How Long” is a 1974 song by the British group Ace from their album Five-A-Side. It reached No. 3 in the US and Canadian charts, and No. 20 in the UK Singles Chart.[3]

Although widely interpreted as being about adultery, the song was in fact composed by lead singer Paul Carrackupon discovering that bassist Terry Comer had been secretly working with the Sutherland Brothers and Quiver.[4]Comer returned to Ace in time to play on the song.[5]

The guitar solo is by Alan “Bam” King.[6]

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Posted by on May 26, 2018 in 1970s, male vocal group, uk

 

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“Lovin’ Spoonful – Daydream”

“Lovin’ Spoonful – Daydream”

The Lovin’ Spoonful is an American rock band, inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000 and well known for a number of hit songs in the 1960s including “Summer in the City”, “Do You Believe In Magic”, “Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind?”, and “Daydream”.

Career

Formation and early years (1964–1965)

The band had its roots in the folk music scene based in the Greenwich Village section of lower Manhattan during the early 1960s. John Sebastian grew up in contact with music and musicians, the son of a much-recorded and technically accomplished classical harmonica player (also named John Sebastian). He had reached maturity toward the end of the American folk music revival that spanned from the 1950s to the early 1960s. Sebastian was joined in the Spoonful by guitarist Zal Yanovsky from a bohemian folk group called The Mugwumps (two other members, Cass Elliot and Denny Doherty, would later form half of the Mamas & the Papas), playing local coffee houses and small clubs. The formation of the Lovin’ Spoonful during this period was later described in the lyrics of the Mamas & the Papas’ 1967 top ten hit, “Creeque Alley”.

Drummer Jan Carl and bassist Steve Boone rounded out the group, but Carl was replaced by drummer-vocalist Joe Butler after the group’s first gig at The Night Owl in Greenwich Village. Butler had previously played with Boone in a group called The Kingsmen (not the hit group of “Louie Louie” fame). The group’s first Night Owl performances were reportedly so bad that the club owner told them to go away and practice, so they practiced in the basement of the nearby Hotel Albert until they had improved enough to draw audience attention.

The group made its first recordings for Elektra Records in early 1965, and agreed in principle to sign a long-term deal with Elektra in exchange for a $10,000 advance. However, Kama Sutra Records had an option to sign the Lovin’ Spoonful as recording artists as part of a previously signed production deal, and Kama Sutra exercised the option upon learning of Elektra’s intent to sign the band. The four tracks recorded for Elektra were released on the 1966 various artists compilation LP What’s Shakin’ after the band’s success on Kama Sutra.

Pop success (1965–1966)
The band worked with producer Erik Jacobsen to release their first single on July 20, 1965, “Do You Believe in Magic”, written by Sebastian. Additionally, they wrote all their own material (aside from a few covers, mostly on their first album),[5][6] including “Younger Girl” (which missed the Hot 100), which was a hit for The Critters in mid-1966.

“Do You Believe in Magic” reached #9 on the Hot 100, and the band followed it up with a series of hit singles and albums throughout 1965 and 1966, all produced by Jacobsen. The Lovin’ Spoonful became known for such folk-flavored pop hits as “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice”, which reached #10, and “Daydream”, which went to #2.[5][7] Other hits included “Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind?” (another #2 hit) and their only song to reach #1 on the Hot 100, “Summer in the City” (13–27 August 1966). Later that year, the #10 hit “Rain on the Roof” and the #8 hit “Nashville Cats” completed the group’s first seven consecutive Hot 100 hits to reach that chart’s top 10. The only other 1960s act to achieve that feat is Gary Lewis & The Playboys.

The Lovin’ Spoonful was one of the most successful pop/rock groups to have jug band and folk roots, and nearly half the songs on their first album were modernized versions of blues standards. Their popularity revived interest in the form, and many subsequent jug bands cite them as an inspiration. The rest of their albums featured mostly original songs, but their jug band roots showed up again and again, particularly in “Daydream” and the lesser-known “Money” (which only reached #48, in 1968), featuring a typewriter as percussion.

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“Bring Me Your Cup – UB 40”

“Bring Me Your Cup – UB 40”

Love Songs is a compilation album by British reggae band UB40. … “I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight” (Robert Palmer Featuring UB40) and, “Bring Me Your Cup(1993).

It was released in 2009 and includes all the love songs from by the band. The album includes 17 solo tracks as well as the 2 tracks that the band performed with Chrissie Hynde from The Pretenders and the Robert Palmer
track.

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2018 in male vocal group, uk

 

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“Led Zeppelin Stairway To Heaven STUDIO VERSION HQ”

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“So Happy Together – The Turtles”

“So Happy Together – The Turtles”

“Happy Together” is a 1967 song from The Turtles’ album of the same name. Released in February 1967, the song knocked The Beatles’ “Penny Lane” out of the number one slot for three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100.[1] It was the group’s only chart-topper. “Happy Together” reached number 12 on the UK Singles Chart in April 1967.[2] The song was written by Garry Bonner and Alan Gordon, former members of a band known as The Magicians.[1] The song had been rejected a dozen times before it was offered to The Turtles, and the demo acetate was worn out.[3]

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“America – A Horse With No Name+Lyrics”

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America is a rock band, formed in England in 1970 by multi-instrumentalists Dewey Bunnell, Dan Peek, and Gerry Beckley. The trio first met as sons of U.S. Air Force personnel stationed in London, where they began performing live. America achieved significant popularity in the 1970s, and was famous for the trio’s close vocal harmonies and light acoustic folk sound. This popularity was confirmed by a string of hit albums and singles, many of which found airplay on pop/soft rock stations.

The band came together shortly after the members’ graduation from high school, and a record deal with Warner Bros. Records followed. Their debut, a 1971 self-titled album, produced the transatlantic hits “A Horse with No Name” and “I Need You”; Homecoming (1972) produced the single “Ventura Highway”; and Hat Trick (1973), a modest success on the charts which fared poorly in sales, produced one minor hit song. 1974’s Holiday featured the hits “Tin Man” and “Lonely People”; and 1975’s Hearts generated the number one single “Sister Golden Hair” alongside “Daisy Jane”. History: America’s Greatest Hits, a compilation of hit singles, was released the same year and was certified multi-platinum in the United States and Australia. Peek left the group in 1977 and their commercial fortunes declined, despite a brief return to the top in 1982 with the single “You Can Do Magic”.

Four decades into their career, the group continues to record material and tour with regularity. Their 2007 album Here & Now was a collaboration with a new generation of musicians who credited the band as an influence. America has been inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame and has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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