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Category Archives: male vocal group

“The Rascals – It’s A Beautiful Morning”

“The Rascals – It’s A Beautiful Morning”

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“A Beautiful Morning” is a song written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and recorded by The Rascals. Coming out in early 1968, it was the group’s first single released under that name rather than The Young Rascals. The first album on which the song appeared was Time Peace: The Rascals’ Greatest Hits. It continued the theme of carefree optimism that had distinguished the previous year’s “Groovin'”. The song was a big hit in the United States, reaching number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also reaching number 36 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.[1] It was RIAA-certified as a Million Seller on June 28, 1968. The song had an introductory sound of mystical wind chimes and bells.

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“Parliament – Flashlight”

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Parliament was a funk band most prominent during the 1970s. Both Parliament and its sister act, Funkadelic, were led by George Clinton.

History

Parliament was originally The Parliaments, a doo-wop vocal group based at a Plainfield, New Jersey barbershop. The group was formed in the late 1950s and included George Clinton, Ray Davis, Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, and Grady Thomas. Clinton was the group leader and manager. The group finally had a hit single in 1967 with “(I Wanna) Testify” on Revilot Records. To capitalize, Clinton formed a backing band for a tour, featuring teenage barbershop employee Billy Bass Nelson on bass and his friend Eddie Hazel on guitar, with the lineup eventually rounded out by Tawl Ross on guitar, Tiki Fulwood on drums, and Mickey Atkins on organ.

During a contractual dispute with Revilot, Clinton temporarily lost the rights to the name “The Parliaments”, and signed the ensemble to Westbound Records as Funkadelic, which Clinton positioned as a funk-rock band featuring the five touring musicians with the five Parliaments singers as uncredited guests. With Funkadelic as a recording and touring entity in its own right, in 1970 Clinton relaunched the singing group, now known as Parliament, at first featuring the same ten members. Clinton was now the leader of two different acts, Parliament and Funkadelic, which featured the same members but were marketed as creating two different types of funk.

The Parliament album entitled Osmium was released on Invictus Records in 1970, and was later reissued on CD with non-album tracks as both Rhenium and First Thangs. Osmium featured a mostly psychedelic soul sound that was more similar to the Funkadelic albums of the period than to the later Parliament albums. The song “The Breakdown” was released separately as a single, and reached #30 on the R&B charts in 1971. Due to continuing contractual problems and the fact that Funkadelic releases were more successful at the time, Clinton abandoned the name Parliament until 1974.

Following Osmium, the lineup of Parliament-Funkadelic began going through many changes and was expanded significantly, with the addition of important members such as keyboardist Bernie Worrell in 1970, singer/guitarist Garry Shider in 1971, and bassist Bootsy Collins (recruited from the James Brown backing band) in 1972. Dozens of singers and musicians would contribute to future Parliament-Funkadelic releases. Clinton relaunched Parliament in 1974 and signed the act to Casablanca Records. Parliament, now augmented by the Horny Horns (also recruited from James Brown’s band) was positioned as a smoother R&B-based funk ensemble with intricate horn and vocal arrangements, and as a counterpoint to the guitar-based funk-rock of Funkadelic. By this point, Parliament and Funkadelic were touring as a combined entity known as Parliament-Funkadelic or simply P-Funk (which also became the catch-all term for George Clinton’s rapidly growing stable of funk artists).

The album Up for the Down Stroke was released in 1974, with Chocolate City following in 1975. Both performed strongly on the Billboard R&B charts and were moderately successful on the Pop charts. Parliament began its period of greatest mainstream success with the concept album Mothership Connection (1975), the lyrics of which launched much of the P-Funk mythology. The subsequent albums The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein (1976), Funkentelechy vs. the Placebo Syndrome (1977), and Motor Booty Affair (1978) all reached high on both the R&B and Pop charts, while Funkadelic was also experiencing significant mainstream success. Parliament scored the #1 R&B singles “Flash Light” in 1977 and “Aqua Boogie” in 1978.

The rapidly expanding ensemble of musicians and singers in the Parliament-Funkadelic enterprise, as well as Clinton’s problematic management practices, began to take their toll by the late 1970s. Original Parliaments members Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, and Grady Thomas, who had been with Clinton since the barbershop days in the late 1950s, felt marginalized by the continuous influx of new members and departed acrimoniously in 1977. Other important group members like singer/guitarist Glenn Goins and drummer Jerome Brailey left Parliament-Funkadelic in the late 1970s after disputes over Clinton’s management. Two further Parliament albums, Gloryhallastoopid (1979) and Trombipulation (1980) were less successful than the albums from the group’s prime 1975-1978 period.

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“LET IT BE” …..SONG by the Beatles

“LET IT BE” …..SONG by the Beatles

TOWER AND FLIGHTS

Let It Be is a song by The Beatles, released in March 6th 1970 as a single, and as the title track of their album Let It Be. Although credited to Lennon/McCartney it is generally accepted to be a Paul McCartney composition.
The single reached #1 in the U.S., Australia, Italy, Norway and Switzerland and #2 in the UK.

It was the final single released by the Beatles while the band was still active. The song was played in the ending of the song, “The Complete Beatles.”

LET IT BE – (Lyrics)

When I
find myself in times of trouble,
Mother Mary comes to me
Speaking words of wisdom,
let it be
And in my hour of darkness she
is standing right in front of me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be
Let it be, let it be, let it be, let it be
Whisper words of wisdom, let…

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“In The Summertime – Mungo Jerry (with lyrics)”

“In The Summertime – Mungo Jerry (with lyrics)”

The song most associated with MUNGO JERRY is the global hit IN THE SUMMERTIME, it sold over six million copies worldwide in the first six months of release and that total is now estimated to be over a staggering thirty million units, and it is now officially recognised as the most played summer song of all time. Winning for itself and its writer RAY DORSET, prestigious Sony / ATV and Ivor Novello awards.
In describing the music of MUNGO JERRY as pure pop would be an insult to the varying styles of rock, blues, boogie and skiffle that has graced the stages of concerts and festivals which have seen MUNGO JERRY sharing and indeed at times topping the bill with the likes of JIMI HENDRIX, ELTON JOHN, ROD STEWART & THE FACES, GENESIS, STATUS QUO, CANNED HEAT, FREE.

Just after the single’s release, the band turned in a breathtaking performance at the Hollywood Music Festival, near Newcastle Under-Lyme with acts including BLACK SABBATH, TRAFFIC, JOSE FELICIANO and making their first UK appearance, GRATEFUL DEAD…..

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“THREE DOG NIGHT – JOY TO THE WORLD”

“Joy to the World”is a song written by Hoyt Axton, and made famous by the band Three Dog Night. The song is also popularly known by its opening words, “Jeremiah was a bullfrog”. Three Dog Night originally released the song on their fourth studio album, Naturally in November 1970 and subsequently released an edited version of the song as a single in February 1971.[1]

The song, which has been described by members of Three Dog Night as a “kid’s song” and a “silly song”,[2] topped the main singles charts in North America, was certified gold by the RIAA, and has since been covered by multiple artists.

The song is featured prominently in the film The Big Chill. It is sung by a child character at the beginning and the Three Dog Night recording is played over the end credits. It is also featured in the end credits of the 2016 adult animated comedy film Sausage Party.

It is also played at the end of every Denver Broncos victory at Sports Authority Field at Mile High and, before it, Mile High Stadium. Notable playings of this song after Broncos victories included then-Chicago Bears head coach Abe Gibron’s singing along with the song in 1973, as immortalized by the Football Follies; and at the end of Super Bowl XXXII, played at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego.

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“The Hollies – He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother”

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He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother” is a popular music ballad written by Bobby Scott and Bob Russell. Originally recorded by Kelly Gordon in 1969, the song became a worldwide hit for The Hollies later that year and again for Neil Diamond in 1970. It has been covered by many artists in subsequent years. The Hollies’ and Rufus Wainwright’s versions of the song were featured in the film Zoolander.

Origin of the song

Scott and Russell had been introduced to each other by Johnny Mercer, at a California nightclub. Although Russell was dying of lymphoma and the pair met in person only three times, they managed to collaborate on the song.

Origin of the title

In 1884, James Wells, Moderator of the United Free Church of Scotland, in his book The Parables of Jesus tells the story of a little girl carrying a big baby boy. Seeing her struggling, someone asked if she wasn’t tired. With surprise she replied, “No, he’s not heavy; he’s my brother.”[3]

In a 1918 publication by Ralph Waldo Trine titled The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit, he relates the following anecdote: “Do you know that incident in connection with the little Scottish girl? She was trudging along, carrying as best she could a boy younger, but it seemed almost as big as she herself, when one remarked to her how heavy he must be for her to carry, when instantly came the reply: ‘He’s na heavy. He’s mi brither.'”[4]

The first editor of Kiwanis magazine, Roe Fulkerson, published a column in September 1924 carrying the title “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother”, the first use of the phrase exactly as it is rendered in the song title.

In the 1940s, the words, adapted as “He ain’t heavy, Father, he’s my brother”, were taken as a slogan for Boys Town children’s home by founder Father Edward Flanagan.[5]

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“Procol Harum ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale”

“Procol Harum ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale”

A Whiter Shade of Pale” is the debut single by the English rock band Procol Harum, released 12 May 1967. The record reached number one in the UK Singles Chart on 8 June 1967, and stayed there for six weeks. Without much promotion, it reached No. 5 on the US charts. One of the counterculture anthems of the 1967 Summer of Love, it is one of fewer than 30 singles to have sold over 10 million copies worldwide.
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