Category Archives: male vocal group

Blue Magic – Sideshow


Blue Magic is an American R&B/soul music group, and one of the most popular Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. Founded in 1972, the group’s original members included lead singer Ted Mills with Vernon Sawyer, Wendell Sawyer, Keith Beaton, and Richard Pratt. Their most notable songs included smooth soul ballads such as “Sideshow”, “Spell”, “What’s Come Over Me”, “Three Ring Circus” and “Stop to Start.”


Blue Magic was formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1972 when former member of The Delfonics Randy Cain brought in singer-songwriter Ted Mills to do some writing with the Philly-based WMOT production company to create a new band. A short time later the group Shades of Love, featuring Keith Beaton, Richard Pratt, Vernon Sawyer and his brother Wendell, came in to audition. (According to Marc Taylor in his book ‘A Touch of Classic Soul of the Early 1970s’,[1] “although the group performed admirably, they lacked a standout lead singer”.) The execs decided to replace the Toppicks, the act Mills recorded with. They inserted Shades of Love (which they owned contractually) with Ted Mills and retitled the group Blue Magic. They were signed with Atco Records through WMOT in the same year.


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What Does It Take – Junior Walker- 1969


Autry DeWalt Mixon, Jr. (June 14, 1931 – November 23, 1995),[1] known by the stage name Junior Walker, styled as Jr. Walker, was an American musician. His group, Jr. Walker & the All Stars, were signed to Motown’s Soul label in the 1960s, and became one of the company’s signature acts.

Life and career
Walker was born Autry DeWalt Mixon, Jr. in Blytheville, Arkansas,[1] and grew up in South Bend, Indiana. His saxophone style was the anchor for the band’s overall sound. The other original members of the group were drummer Tony Washington, guitarist Willie Woods, and keyboardist Vic Thomas.

The 1950s
His career started when he developed his own band in the mid-1950s as the “Jumping Jacks.”[1] His longtime friend Billy Nicks (drummer) formed his own team, the “Rhythm Rockers.” Periodically, Nicks would sit in on Jumping Jack’s shows, and Walker would sit in on the Rhythm Rockers shows.

Nicks obtained a permanent gig at a local TV station in South Bend, Indiana, and asked Walker to join him and his keyboard player (Fred Patton) permanently. Shortly after, Nicks asked Willie Woods, a local singer, to perform with the group; shortly after Woods would learn how to play guitar also. When Nicks got drafted into the United States Army, Walker convinced the band to move from South Bend to Battle Creek, Michigan.[1] While performing in Benton Harbor, Walker found a drummer, Tony Washington, to replace Nicks.[1] Eventually, Fred Patton (piano player) left the group, and Victor Thomas stepped in.[1] The original name, “The Rhythm Rockers,” was changed to “The All Stars”. Walker’s squealing gutbucket style was inspired by jump blues and early R&B, particularly players like Louis Jordan, Earl Bostic, and Illinois Jacquet.[1]

The 1960s and the 1970s
The group was spotted by Johnny Bristol, and he recommended them to Harvey Fuqua, in 1961, who had his own record labels.[1] Once the group started recording on the Harvey label, their name was changed to Jr. Walker All Stars. The name was modified again when Fuqua’s labels were taken over by Motown’s Berry Gordy, and Jr. Walker & the All Stars became members of the Motown family, recording for their Soul imprint in 1964.[1]

The members of the band changed after the acquisition of the Harvey label. Tony Washington, the drummer, quit the group, and James Graves joined. Their first and signature hit was “Shotgun,” written and composed by Walker and produced by Berry Gordy, which featured the Funk Brothers’ James Jamerson on bass and Benny Benjamin on drums. “Shotgun” reached No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 1 on the R&B chart in 1965, and was followed by many other hits, such as “(I’m A) Road Runner,” “Shake and Fingerpop” and covers of the Motown songs “Come See About Me” and “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You)”. In 1966, Graves left and was replaced by old cohort Billy “Stix” Nicks, and Walker’s hits continued apace with tunes such as “I’m a Road Runner” and “Pucker Up Buttercup”.[1]

In 1969, the group had another hit enter the top 5, “What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)”.[1] A Motown quality control meeting rejected this song for single release, but radio station DJs made the track popular, resulting in Motown releasing it as a single, whereupon it reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on the R&B chart. From that time on Walker sang more on the records than earlier in their career. He landed several more R&B Top Ten hits over the next few years, with the last coming in 1972.[1] In 1979, Walker went solo, disbanding the All Stars, and was signed to Norman Whitfield’s Whitfield Records label,[1] but he was not as successful on his own as he had been with the All Stars in his Motown period.



In the Rain – The Dramatics

In the Rain – The Dramatics

In the Rain” is a 1972 soul single by American vocal group The Dramatics. Released from their debut album Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get it reached number five on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and spent four weeks at number one on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart.
It sold over one million copies, and is the group’s biggest hit.
Billboard ranked it as the No. 53 song for 1972.

The song was written by Tony Hester and was released in February 1972.

The song is noted for the use of the sound of rain and thunder, first heard before the song’s introduction, as well as throughout the instrumental and chorus sections of the song.

The song’s lyrics stated that the singer wants to go out and stand in the rain, because of a broken love relationship, though he stated that it may sound crazy,

Keith Sweat covered the song on his 1987 album Make It Last Forever.

R&B group Xscape also covered the song in 1997 from the soundtrack, Love Jonesstarring Larenz Tate and Nia Long.

Smooth Jazz artist Boney James covered the song featuring Dwele on the Shine album in 2006.


Posted by on March 21, 2018 in male vocal group, r&b, soul oldies



“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

In 1962, while playing a gig at the Pypo Club in Seaside, Oregon, then managed by Al Dardis, the band noticed Rockin’ Robin Roberts’s version of

“Louie Louie”

being played on the jukebox for hours on end. The entire club would get up and dance.Ely convinced the Kingsmen to learn the song, which they played at dances to a great crowd response. Unknown to him, he changed the beat because he misheard it on a jukebox. Ken Chase, host of radio station KISN, formed his own club to capitalize on these dance crazes. Dubbed the “Chase”, the Kingsmen became the club’s house band and Ken Chase became the band’s manager. On April 5, 1963, Chase booked the band an hour-long session at the local Northwestern Inc. studio for the following day. The band had just played a 90-minute

“Louie Louie”


Despite the band’s annoyance at having so little time to prepare, on April 6 at 10 am the Kingsmen walked into the three-microphone recording studio. In order to sound like a live performance, Ely was forced to lean back and sing to a microphone suspended from the ceiling. “It was more yelling than singing,” Ely said, “’cause I was trying to be heard over all the instruments.” In addition, he was wearing braces at the time of the performance, further compounding his infamously slurred words. Ely sang the beginning of the third verse several bars too early, but realized his mistake and waited for the rest of the band to catch up. In what was thought to be a warm-up, the song was recorded in its first and only take. The Kingsmen were not proud of the version, but their manager liked the rawness of their cover. The B-side was “Haunted Castle”, composed by Ely and Don Gallucci, the new keyboardist. However, Lynn Easton was credited on both the Jerden and Wand releases. The entire session cost $50, and the band split the cost.

“Louie Louie” was kept from the top spot on the charts in late 1963 and early 1964 by the Singing Nun and Bobby Vinton, who monopolized the No.1 slot for four weeks apiece. The Kingsmen single reached No. 1 on the Cashbox chart and No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Additionally in the UK it reached No. 26 on the Record Retailer chart. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

The band attracted nationwide attention when “Louie Louie” was banned by the governor of Indiana, Matthew E. Welsh, also attracting the attention of the FBI because of alleged indecent lyrics in their version of the song. The lyrics were, in fact, innocent, but Ely’s baffling enunciation permitted teenage fans and concerned parents alike to imagine the most scandalous obscenities. All of this attention only made the song more popular. In April 1966 “Louie Louie” was reissued and once again hit the music charts, reaching No. 65 on the Cashbox chart and No. 97 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.


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Brown Sugar – The Rolling Stones


The Rolling Stones are an English rock band formed in London in 1962. The first settled line-up consisted of Brian Jones (guitar, harmonica), Ian Stewart (piano), Mick Jagger (lead vocals, harmonica), Keith Richards (guitar), Bill Wyman (bass) and Charlie Watts (drums). Stewart was removed from the official line-up in 1963 but continued as occasional pianist until his death in 1985. Jones departed the band less than a month prior to his death in 1969, having already been replaced by Mick Taylor, who remained until 1975. Subsequently, Ronnie Wood has been on guitar in tandem with Richards. Following Wyman’s departure in 1993, Darryl Jones has been the main bassist. Other notable keyboardists for the band have included Nicky Hopkins, active from 1967 to 1982; Billy Preston through the mid 1970s (most prominent on Black and Blue) and Chuck Leavell, active since 1982. The band was first led by Jones but after teaming as the band’s songwriters, Jagger and Richards assumed de facto leadership.

The Rolling Stones were in the vanguard of the British Invasion of bands that became popular in the US in 1964–65. At first noted for their longish hair as much as their music, the band are identified with the youthful and rebellious counterculture of the 1960s. Critic Sean Egan states that within a year of the release of their 1964 debut album, they “were being perceived by the youth of Britain and then the world as representatives of opposition to an old, cruel order—the antidote to a class-bound, authoritarian culture.”[1] They were instrumental in making blues a major part of rock and roll and of changing the international focus of blues culture to the less sophisticated blues typified by Chess Records artists such as Muddy Waters — writer of “Rollin’ Stone”, after which the band is named. After a short period of musical experimentation that culminated with the poorly received and largely psychedelic album Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967), the group returned to its bluesy roots with Beggars Banquet (1968) which—along with its follow-ups, Let It Bleed (1969), Sticky Fingers (1971) and Exile on Main St (1972)—is generally considered to be the band’s best work and are considered the Rolling Stones’ “Golden Age”. It was during this period the band were first introduced on stage as “The World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band”.[2][3] Musicologist Robert Palmer attributed the “remarkable endurance” of the Rolling Stones to being “rooted in traditional verities, in rhythm-and-blues and soul music”, while “more ephemeral pop fashions have come and gone”.[4]

The band continued to release commercially successful records in the 1970s and sold many albums, with Some Girls (1978) and Tattoo You (1981) being their two most sold albums worldwide. In the 1980s, a feud between Jagger and Richards about the band’s musical direction almost caused the band to split but they managed to patch their relationship up and had a big comeback with Steel Wheels (1989), which was followed by a big stadium and arena tour. Since the 1990s, new recorded material from the group has been increasingly less well-received and less frequent. Despite this, the Rolling Stones have continued to be a huge attraction on the live circuit, with big stadium tours in the 1990s and 2000s. By 2007, the band had made what were then four of the top five highest-grossing concert tours of all time (Voodoo Lounge Tour (1994–95), Bridges to Babylon Tour (1997–99), Licks Tour (2002–03) and A Bigger Bang Tour (2005–07).[5]


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“Chicago – Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”

“Chicago – Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”


Chicago is an American rock band formed in 1967 in Chicago, Illinois. The self-described “rock and roll band with horns” began as a politically charged, sometimes experimental, rock band and later moved to a predominantly softer sound, generating several hit ballads. The group had a steady stream of hits throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Second only to The Beach Boys in Billboard singles and albums chart success among American bands, Chicago is one of the longest-running and most successful rock groups, and one of the world’s best-selling groups of all time, having sold more than 100 million records.[1][2]

According to Billboard, Chicago was the leading US singles charting group during the 1970s. They have sold over 40 million units in the US, with 23 gold, 18 platinum, and 8 multi-platinum albums.[3][4] Over the course of their career they have had five number-one albums and 21 top-ten singles.

Group history

Chicago Transit Authority and early success

The original band membership consisted of saxophonist Walter Parazaider, guitarist Terry Kath, drummer Danny Seraphine, trombonist James Pankow, trumpet player Lee Loughnane, and keyboardist/singer Robert Lamm. Parazaider, Kath, Seraphine, Pankow and Loughnane met in 1967 while students at DePaul University. Lamm was recruited from Roosevelt University. The group of six called themselves “The Big Thing”, and continued playing top 40 hits. Realizing the need for a tenor to complement baritone Lamm and Kath, they added local tenor and bassist Peter Cetera.[5]

Jimi Hendrix once told Parazaider, “Jeez, your horn players are like one set of lungs and your guitar player is better than me.”[6]

While gaining some success as a cover band, the group began working on original songs. In June 1968, they moved to Los Angeles, California under the leadership of their manager James William Guercio, and signed with Columbia Records. After signing with Guercio, The Big Thing changed their name to “Chicago Transit Authority”.[1]

Their first record (April 1969), the eponymous Chicago Transit Authority, is a double album, which is rare for a band’s first release. It sold over one million copies by 1970, and was awarded a platinum disc.[7] The album included a number of pop-rock songs – “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”, “Beginnings”, “Questions 67 and 68”, and “I’m a Man” – which were later released as singles.

When the actual Chicago Transit Authority threatened legal action soon after the album’s release, the band’s name was shortened to Chicago.[8][9]

The 1970s: Chicago

The band released a second album, titled Chicago (retroactively known as Chicago II), which is another double-LP. The album’s centerpiece track is a seven-part, 13-minute suite composed by Pankow called “Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon”. The suite yielded two top ten hits: “Make Me Smile” (No. 9 U.S.) and “Colour My World”, both sung by Kath. Among the other tracks on the album: Lamm’s dynamic but cryptic “25 or 6 to 4” (Chicago’s first Top 5 hit), which is a reference to a songwriter trying to write at 25 or 26 minutes before 4 o’clock in the morning, and was sung by Cetera with Terry Kath on guitar, the lengthy war-protest song “It Better End Soon”; and, at the end, Cetera’s 1969 moon landing-inspired “Where Do We Go from Here?”. The double-LP album’s inner cover includes the playlist, the entire lyrics to “It Better End Soon”, and two declarations: “This endeavor should be experienced sequentially”, and, “With this album, we dedicate ourselves, our futures and our energies to the people of the revolution. And the revolution in all of its forms.”

Chicago III would contain two hit singles. “Free” from Lamm’s “Travel Suite” would become the album’s biggest hit. The band would release LPs at a rate of at least one album per year from their third album in 1971 on through the 1970s. During this period, the group’s album titles invariably consisted of the band’s name followed by a Roman numeral, indicating the album’s sequence in their canon. The exceptions to this scheme were the band’s fourth album, a live boxed set entitled Chicago at Carnegie Hall, their twelfth album Hot Streets, and the Arabic-numbered Chicago 13. While the live album itself did not bear a number, each of the four discs within the set was numbered Volumes I through IV.

In 1971, the band released Chicago at Carnegie Hall Volumes I, II, III, and IV, consisting of live performances, mostly of music from their first three albums, from a week-long run at the famous venue. The packaging of the album also contained some rather strident political messaging about how “We [youth] can change The System”, including massive wall posters and voter registration information. Nevertheless, Chicago at Carnegie Hall went on to become the best-selling box set by a rock act, and held that record for 15 years. The fact that none of the first four titles were issued on single LPs was due to the productive creativity of this period and the length of the jazz-rock pieces.[10]

In 1972 the band released its first single-disc release, Chicago V, which reached number one on both the Billboard pop and jazz album charts. It features “Saturday in the Park”, which mixes everyday life and political yearning in a more subtle way. It peaked at No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in early 1972. Chicago would long open their concerts with the hit song. Another Lamm-composed hit song therein was “Dialogue (Part I & II)”, which featured a musical “debate” between a political activist (sung by Kath) and a blasé college student (sung by Cetera).

In 1973, Guercio produced and directed Electra Glide in Blue, a film about an Arizona motorcycle policeman. The film stars Robert Blake and features Cetera, Kath, Loughnane, and Parazaider in supporting roles. The group also appears prominently on the film’s soundtrack.

Other albums and singles followed in each of the succeeding years. 1973’s Chicago VI was the first of several albums to include Brazilian jazz percussionist Laudir de Oliveira and saw Cetera emerge as the main lead singer. Chicago VII, the band’s double-disc 1974 release, their 1975 release, Chicago VIII, featured the political allegory “Harry Truman” (#13) and the nostalgic Pankow-composed “Old Days” (#5). That summer also saw a joint tour across America with the Beach Boys, with both acts performing separately, then coming together for a finale.

1976’s Chicago X features Cetera’s ballad “If You Leave Me Now”, which held the top spot in the US charts (for two weeks) and the UK charts (for three weeks.) The song also won Chicago their only Grammy award, for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group in 1977. The tune almost did not make the cut for the album. “If You Leave Me Now” was recorded at the very last minute. The success of the song foreshadowed a later reliance on ballads.

The group’s 1977 release, Chicago XI, includes Cetera’s ballad “Baby, What a Big Surprise”, a No. 4 U.S. hit which became the group’s last top 10 hit of the decade.

Death of Terry Kath and transition Edit
1978 began with a split with Guercio. On January 23 of that same year, Kath died of an accidental, self-inflicted gunshot wound.[11]

After auditioning over 30 potential replacements for Kath, Chicago decided upon guitarist/singer/songwriter Donnie Dacus. While filming for the musical Hair, he joined the band in April 1978 just in time for the Hot Streets album. Its energetic lead-off single, “Alive Again”, brought Chicago back to the Top 15; Pankow wrote it “originally as a love song but ultimately as recognition of Kath’s guiding spirit shining down from above.”[12]

The 1978 album Hot Streets had producer Phil Ramone at the helm. It was Chicago’s first album with a title rather than a number; and was the band’s first LP to have a picture of the band (shot by photographer Norman Seeff) featured prominently on the cover (with the ubiquitous logo downsized). These two moves were seen by many as indications that the band had changed following Kath’s death. To a degree, the band returned to the old naming scheme on its subsequent releases, although most titles would now bear Arabic numerals rather than Roman numerals. Hot Streets, the band’s 12th album, peaked at No. 12 on the Billboard charts; it was Chicago’s first release since their debut to fail to make the Top 10. The release also marked a move somewhat away from the jazz-rock direction favored by Kath and towards more pop songs and ballads. Dacus stayed with the band through the 1979 album Chicago 13, and is also featured in a promotional video on the DVD included in the Rhino Records Chicago box set from 2003. Again produced by Ramone, it was the group’s first studio album not to contain a Top 40 hit. Dacus departed from the band shortly after the album’s release.

The 1980s: changing sound, and the ballads

Chicago XIV (1980), produced by Tom Dowd, relegated the horn section to the background on a number of tracks, and the album’s two singles failed to make the Top 40. Chris Pinnick joined the band to handle the guitar duties and would remain through 1985, and the band were also augmented by saxophone player Marty Grebb on the subsequent tour. Believing the band to no longer be commercially viable, Columbia Records dropped them from its roster in 1981 and released a second “Greatest Hits” volume (also known as Chicago XV) later that year to fulfill its contractual obligation.

In late 1981, the band had a new producer (David Foster), a new label (Warner Brothers), and the addition of keyboardist, guitarist, and singer Bill Champlin (Sons of Champlin). Percussionist Laudir de Oliveira and Marty Grebb departed from the band. During Foster’s stewardship, less of an emphasis was placed on the band’s horn-based sound, being replaced by lush power ballads, which became Chicago’s style during the 1980s. The new sound brought more singles success to the band than they had ever had prior to that point, but it reportedly caused internal friction within the band members, which in turn reportedly led to Cetera’s departure in 1985.[citation needed]

For the 1982 album Chicago 16, Foster brought in studio musicians for some tracks (including the core members of Toto), and used new technology (such as synthesizers) to “update” and streamline the sound, further pushing back the horn section, and in some cases not even using them at all. The band did return to the charts with the Cetera-sung ballad “Hard to Say I’m Sorry/Get Away”, which is featured in the soundtrack of the Daryl Hannah film Summer Lovers.

1984’s Chicago 17 became the biggest selling album of the band’s history, producing two more Top Ten (both No. 3) singles, “You’re the Inspiration” and “Hard Habit to Break”. The album included two other singles: “Stay the Night” (No. 16) and “Along Comes a Woman” (No. 14). Peter’s brother, Kenny Cetera, was brought into the group for the 17 tour to add percussion and high harmony vocals.


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“You Really Got Me” is a song written by Ray Davies for English rock band the Kinks. The song, originally performed in a more blues-oriented style, was inspired by artists such as Lead Belly and Big Bill Broonzy. Two versions of the song were recorded, with the second performance being used for the final single. Although it was rumoured that future Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page had performed the song’s guitar solo, the myth has since been proven false.

“You Really Got Me” was built around power chords (perfect fifths and octaves) and heavily influenced later rock musicians, particularly in the genres of heavy metal and punk rock. Built around a guitar riff played by Dave Davies, the song’s lyrics were described by Dave as “a love song for street kids.”[3]

“You Really Got Me” was released on 4 August 1964 as the group’s third single, and reached number one on the UK singles chart the next month, remaining for two weeks. The song became the group’s breakthrough hit; it established them as one of the top British Invasion acts in the United States, reaching number seven there later in the year. “You Really Got Me” was later included on the Kinks’ debut album, Kinks. The song was covered by American rock band Van Halen in 1978, reaching the Billboard Top 40.


[The original demo version of ‘You Really Got Me’] had very way-out words and a funny sort of ending that didn’t. We did it differently on the record because [this original version] was really rather uncommercial.

– Ray Davies[4]
“You Really Got Me” was written by Ray Davies, the Kinks’ vocalist and main songwriter, sometime between 9 and 12 March 1964.[4] Created on the piano in the front room of the Davies’ home, the song was stylistically very different from the finished product, being much lighter and somewhat jazz-oriented.[4] Ray said of the song’s writing, “When I came up with [‘You Really Got Me’] I hadn’t been writing songs very long at all. It was one of the first five I ever came up with.”[4]

During the spring of 1964, Ray Davies played an early version of “You Really Got Me” on piano to rock photographer Allan Ballard during a photo shoot. Ballard later remembered, “It was quite a small, pokey, Victorian Terrace, a bit scruffy, and in the hallway they had an upright piano. Ray sat down and plonked out, ‘Der-der, der, Der-der!’ He said, ‘What do you reckon to this?’ It meant nothing to me at the time, but it ended up as ‘You Really Got Me’.”[5]

Ray, initially planning for the song to be a “more laid-back number”, later played the chords of the song to brother Dave Davies, the Kinks’ lead guitarist. However, upon hearing the track, Dave decided that the riff would be much more powerful on a guitar.[5] Ray said of the track’s change to a guitar-centred track, “I wanted it to be a jazz-type tune, because that’s what I liked at the time. It’s written originally around a sax line … Dave ended up playing the sax line in fuzz guitar and it took the song a step further.”[4] The band then began to perform the new track in some of their live shows, where it was well received.[6]

In 1998, Ray said, “I’d written ‘You Really Got Me’ as tribute to all those great blues people I love: Lead Belly and Big Bill Broonzy.”[7] Dave cited Gerry Mulligan as an inspiration, saying, “Ray was a great fan of Gerry Mulligan, who was in [the Jazz on a Summer’s Day movie], and as he sat at the piano at home, he sort of messed around in a vein similar to Mulligan and came up with this figure based on a 12-bar blues”.[4] Dave has also said that song had been inspired by Jimmy Giuffre’s song “The Train and the River”.[8] According to the band’s manager, Larry Page, the song’s characteristic riff came about while working out the chords of the Kingsmen’s “Louie Louie”.[3] Lyrically, the song was said to be influenced by an encounter with one of the band’s “first serious female fans.”[4][9]


When I first heard [“You Really Got Me”], I said, “Shit, it doesn’t matter what you do with this, it’s a number one song”. It could have been done in waltz time and it would have been a hit.[6]

– Shel Talmy, producer of “You Really Got Me”
The song was recorded by the Kinks at least twice in the summer of 1964. The band’s demo was in a “bluesy” style, while a full studio version recorded in June was slower and less emphatic than the final single.[10] Although the band wanted to rerecord the song, their record company Pye refused to fund another session on the ground that the band’s first two singles had failed to chart.[6] Ray Davies, however, hated the original recording of the track, threatening that he would refuse to perform or promote the single unless it was rerecorded.[6] Manager Larry Page also refused to publish the original recording.[6] When Pye stood its ground, the band’s own management broke the stalemate by funding the session themselves.[11] Ray Davies’ adamant attitude on behalf of the career-making song effectively established him as the leader and chief songwriter of the Kinks. Davies later said, “I was floundering around trying to find an identity. It was in 1964 that I managed to do that, to be able to justify myself and say, ‘I exist, I’m here.’ I was literally born when that song hit.”[12]

The influential distortion sound of the guitar track was created after guitarist Dave Davies sliced the speaker cone of his guitar amplifier with a razor blade and poked it with a pin.[13] The amplifier was affectionately called “little green”, after the name of the amplifier made by the Elpico company, and purchased in Davies’ neighbourhood music shop, linked to a Vox AC-30.[8] In 2014, Dave Davies accused brother Ray of lying about participating in Dave’s guitar distortion sound. Dave wrote on his Facebook page, “My brother is lying. I don’t know why he does this but it was my Elpico amp that I bought and out of frustration I cut the speaker cone up with a razor blade and I was so shocked and surprised and excited that it worked that I demonstrated the sound to Ray and [Kinks bassist] Pete [Quaife] … Ray liked the sound and he had written a riff on the piano which formed the basis of the song ‘You Really Got Me’ and I played the riff on my guitar with my new sound. I alone created this sound.”[14]

According to recent Kinks’ releases that give full official performance credits of the track, group members Ray Davies (vocals and rhythm guitar), Dave Davies (lead guitar), Pete Quaife (bass) are joined by session men Bobby Graham (drums), and Arthur Greenslade (piano).[15][16] Regular Kinks drummer Mick Avory plays the tambourine.



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