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“Phoebe Snow~Poetry Man”

“Phoebe Snow~Poetry Man”

Phoebe Snow (born Phoebe Ann Laub; July 17, 1950 – April 26, 2011 was an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist, best known for her 1975 song “Poetry Man”. She was described by The New York Times as a “contralto grounded in a bluesy growl and capable of sweeping over four octaves.”

Professional life

It was at The Bitter End club in 1972 that Denny Cordell, co-owner (with Leon Russell) of Shelter Records, was so taken by the singer that he signed her to the label and produced her first recording. She released an eponymous album, Phoebe Snow, in 1974. Featuring guest performances by The Persuasions, Zoot Sims, Teddy Wilson, David Bromberg, and Dave Mason, Snow’s album went on to sell over a million copies in the United States and became one of the most acclaimed recordings of the era.

This spawned a Top Five single on the Billboard Hot 100 with “Poetry Man” and was itself a Top Five album in Billboard, for which she received a nomination for the Grammy Award for Best New Artist. The cover of Rolling Stone magazine followed, while she performed as the opening act for tours by Jackson Browne and Paul Simon (with whom she recorded the hit single “Gone at Last” in 1975). 1975 also brought the first of several appearances as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live, on which Snow performed both solo and in duets with Paul Simon and Linda Ronstadt. During the 1975 appearance, she was seven months pregnant with her daughter, Valerie. Her backup vocal is heard on Paul Simon’s hit song “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” along with Valerie Simpson and Patti Austin, from 1975. She also duets with him on the song gospel-tinged “Gone At Last”. Both songs appear on Simon’s Grammy-winning 1975 album “Still Crazy After All These Years”.

Legal battles took place between Snow and Shelter Records. Snow ended up signed to Columbia Records. Her second album, Second Childhood, appeared in 1976, produced by Phil Ramone. It was jazzier and more introspective, and was an RIAA Certified Gold Album for Phoebe, with the Gold Album awarded on July 9, 1976.[13] She moved to a more rock-oriented sound for It Looks Like Snow, released later in 1976 with David Rubinson producing. 1977 saw Never Letting Go, again with Ramone, while 1978’s Against the Grain was helmed by Barry Beckett. After that Snow parted ways with Columbia; she would later say that the stress of her parental obligations degraded her ability to make music effectively. In 1979, she toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada with noted guitarist Arlen Roth as her lead guitarist and Musical Director. In 1981, Snow, now signed with Mirage Records, released Rock Away, recorded with members of Billy Joel’s band; it spun off the Top 50 hit “Games”.

The 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide summed up Snow’s career so far by saying: “One of the most gifted voices of her generation, Phoebe Snow can do just about anything stylistically as well as technically … The question that’s still unanswered is how best to channel such talent.” Snow spent long periods away from recording, often singing commercial jingles for AT&T and others in order to support herself and her daughter.Later, in the 1990s, Snow’s voice was featured on commercials for Cotton Incorporated and their The Fabric of Our Lives campaign. During the 1980s she also battled her own life-threatening illness.Snow sang the theme song for NBC’s A Different World during the show’s first season (1987–88).

Snow returned to recording with Something Real in 1989 and gathered a few more hits on the Adult Contemporary charts. Also, Snow composed the Detroit’s WDIV-TV Go 4 It! campaign in 1980. She sang Ancient Places, Sacred Lands composed by Steve Horelick on Reading Rainbow’s tenth episode The Gift of the Sacred Dog which was based on the book by Paul Goble and narrated by actor Michael Ansara. It was shot in Crow Agency, Montana in 1983.

Snow performed in 1989 on stage at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City as part of Our Common Future, a five-hour live television broadcast originating from several countries.

In 1990, she contributed a cover version of the Delaney & Bonnie song “Get Ourselves Together” to the Elektra compilation Rubáiyát which included Earth Wind & Fire guitarist Dick Smith. In 1992, she toured with Donald Fagen’s New York Rock and Soul Revue and was featured on the group’s album recorded live at the Beacon Theater in New York City. Throughout the 1990s she made numerous appearances on the Howard Stern radio show. She sang live for specials and birthday shows. In 1997, she sang the Roseanne theme song a cappella during the closing moments of the final episode.

In 1995, Snow participated in The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True at the Lincoln Center in New York City. In addition to Ms. Snow, the Concert featured performances by Jewel, Joel Grey, Roger Daltrey, Jackson Browne amongst others. Snow sang a very distinctive medley of “If I Only had a Brain; a Heart; the Nerve”. An album of the concert was released on Compact Disc on Rhino Records as catalog number R2 72405.

Snow joined the pop group, Zap Mama, who recorded its own version of “Poetry Man,” in an impromptu duet on the PBS series, “Sessions At West 54th.” Hawaiian girl group Na Leo also had a hit on the Adult Contemporary chart in 1999 with their cover version of “Poetry Man”.

In May 1998, Snow received the Cultural Achievement Award by New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. She was also the recipient of a Don Kirschner Rock Award, several Playboy Music Poll Awards, New York Music Awards and the Clio Award.

Snow performed for U.S. President Bill Clinton, First Lady Hillary Clinton, and his cabinet at Camp David in 1999.

In 2003, Snow released her album Natural Wonder on Eagle Records, containing ten original tracks, her first original material in fourteen years. Snow performed at Howard Stern’s wedding in 2008, and made a special appearance in the film Noah’s Arc: Jumping the Broom as herself. Some of her music was also featured on the soundtrack of the film. Her Live album (2008) featured many of her hits as well as a cover of “Piece of My Heart”.

Death

Phoebe Snow suffered a cerebral hemorrhage on January 19, 2010 and slipped into a coma,enduring bouts of blood clots, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure. Snow died on April 26, 2011 at age 60 in Edison, New Jersey.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-22T09:18:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 22 Sep 2018 09:18:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, black music artists, jazz

 

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“Zaz – Je veux/I want” 

Isabelle Geffroy[1] (born 1 May 1980 in Tours, France), better known by the nickname Zaz, is a French singer-songwriter who mixes jazzy stylesFrench varietysoul and acoustic. She is famous for her hit “Je veux”, from her first album, Zaz, released on 10 May 2010.[2]She has sold over 3.4 million albums worldwide and is currently one of the most successful French singers in the world.

In 2001, she started her singing career in the blues band “Fifty Fingers”. She sang in musical groups in Angoulême, especially in a jazz quintet.[4] She became one of the four singers of Izar-Adatz (Basque for “Shooting Star”), a variety band which consisted of sixteen people with whom she toured for two years, especially in the Midi-Pyrenees and the Basque Country. She worked in the studio as a backing singer in Toulouse and performed with many singers, including Maeso, Art Mengo, Vladimir Max, Jean-Pierre Mader, Eduardo Sanguinetti, the latinoamerican philosopher and land-artist,[5] and Serge Guerao.

In 2011, Zaz won an EBBA Award. Every year the European Border Breakers Awards EBBA recognize the success of ten emerging artists or groups who reached audiences outside their own countries with their first internationally released album in the past year.

In May 2010, French magazine Télérama announced: “Rumor has swelled in recent weeks: Zaz is an extraordinary voice, and she will be the revelation of the summer!”.[6] On 10 May 2010, Zaz released her first album. It contains songs she wrote (“Trop sensible”) and co-composed (“Les passants”, “Le long de la route”, “Prends garde à ta langue”, “J’aime à nouveau”, “Ni oui ni non”). Kerredine Soltani produced the album on the label “Play On” and wrote and composed the hit single “Je veux”. The pop singer Raphaël Haroche wrote her songs “Éblouie par la nuit”, “Port Coton” and “La fée”. In 2010, she signed a contract for her tours with Caramba and publisher Sony ATV. She was invited to make several television appearances (such as Taratata or Chabada) and was featured in several programs on the radio. On Sunday 6 October 2013, Zaz appeared on BBC One‘s The Andrew Marr Show in London and sang “Je veux” live.

Zaz then toured France (Paris, La Rochelle, MontaubanSaint-Ouen, Chateauroux, LanderneauFécamp…), performed at the Francofolies of Montreal (Canada), and sang in Monthey (Switzerland), Brussels, Berlin, and Milan. In autumn Zaz topped the charts in Belgium, Switzerland, and Austria. Matthieu Baligand, her manager and producer at Caramba Entertainment, explained to Libération: “We talk a lot of her right now and people are waiting her at the turn… Despite the demand, it seems preferable to do her first tour in fifty small places which will render her credible. Zaz is a popular, intuitive artist, who is familiar with music, who can sing, but doing a quality show is something else (…).” In November 2010, the debut album Zaz became double platinum and she was awarded “Revelation Song” by the Académie Charles Cros. Zaz also won the European Border Breakers Award: she was named the French artist most played abroad in 2010. According to a survey published by L’Internaute, Zaz was the most popular French singer in the 2010 ranking.[7]

She is also featured on the song “Coeur Volant” for the soundtrack of the 2011 film, Hugo. Her live CD and DVD Zaz live tour Sans Tsu Tsou was revealed.

Her song “Eblouie Par La Nuit” was featured in the 2013 American neo-noir crime thriller, “Dead Man Down”.

In 2012, Zaz went on tour and held concerts in various countries around the world including Japan, Canada, Germany, Poland, Switzerland, Slovenia, Czech Republic (Colours of Ostrava), Croatia, Bulgaria, Serbia, and Turkey, among other countries.[8]

With her album Paris she won the 2015 Echo award for best international female rock/pop artist.[9]

LYRICS IN ENGLISH


I want (Je veux)

Give me a suite at the Ritz hotel, I don’t want that

Chanel’s jewellery, I don’t want that

Give me a limo, what would I do with it?

Offer me staff, what would I do with it?

A mansion in Neufchatel, it’s not for me

Offer me the Eiffel tower, what would I do with it?

 

I want love, joy, good spirit

It’s not your money that will make me happy

I want to die with a hand on my heart

Let’s go together, let’s discover my freedom,

Forget all your prejudice, welcome to my reality

 

I’m fed up with your good manners, it’s too much for me

I eat with my hands, I’m like that

I speak loud and I’m direct, sorry

Let’s end the hypocrisy, I’m out of it

I’m tired of double-talks

Look at me, I’m not even mad at you, I’m just like that

 

I want love, joy, good spirit

It’s not your money that will make me happy

I want to die with a hand on my heart

Let’s go together, let’s discover my freedom,

Forget all your prejudice, welcome to my reality

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T09:47:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 09:47:00 +0000 31, in blues, FRENCH FRIDAYS, jazz

 

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“Gary B.B. Coleman – The Sky is Crying”

Gary B.B. Coleman (January 1, 1947 – February 14, 1994)was an American soul blues guitarist, singer, songwriter and record producer.

Originally a local musician turned bluespromoter and session musician, Coleman recorded his debut album in 1986, which was re-released by Ichiban Records. He issued several other albums and produced most of Ichiban’s blues catalogue until his death, in 1994. On many occasions, Coleman undertook multi-instrumentalist duties in the recording studio. He acknowledged both B.B. King, with his “B.B.” moniker, and a fellow Texan, Freddie King.

Coleman was born in Paris, Texas. He was working alongside Freddie King by the age of 15.He later supported Lightnin’ Hopkins in concert and went on to form his own group. At this time he started simultaneously booking acts into nightclubs across three states, Texas, Oklahoma, and Colorado. This dual lifestyle in the Southwest continued for nearly twenty years.In 1985, he created his own independent record label, Mr. B’s Records, and issued a single, “One Eyed Woman”, and his debut album, Nothin’ but the Blues, the following year. The album proved to be popular. Ichiban Records signed Coleman to a recording contract and duly re-released Nothin’ but the Blues on its label in 1987.

If You Can Beat Me Rockin’ (1988) followed, and in the same year Coleman’s duties with Ichiban expanded to include record production for other acts, songwriting, and acting as an A&R scout. He released six more albums up to 1992 and was responsible for production duties on albums by Blues Boy Willie, Chick Willis, Little Johnny Taylor, and Buster Benton (Money’s the Name of the Game, 1989).

He continued to write material for others and sometimes played guitar and keyboards on their records. His own albums featured Songs he wrote, such as “I Fell in Love on a One Night Stand” and “If You Can Beat Me Rockin’ (You Can Have My Chair)”.

Coleman continued to combine various roles successfully until his early death, in 1994.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-10T17:16:07+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 10 Aug 2018 17:16:07 +0000 31, in blues, jazz

 

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“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

Chameleon is the sixth album by American singing trio Labelle. Though Patti LaBelle’s autobiography Don’t Block The Blessings revealed that LaBelle planned a follow-up to Chameleon entitled Shaman, the album never materialized. The trio would not release another new recording until 2008’s Back to Now. The final album was moderately successful peaking at #94 at the Pop charts and #21 on the R&B charts. Only two singles made the charts which were “Get You Somebody New” which peaked at #50 on the Pop charts and their memorable song “Isn’t It A Shame” which debuted at #18 on the R&B charts. “Isn’t It A Shame” was later sampled by Nelly on his 2004 hit, “My Place”, which featured Jaheim.

Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patti LaBelle, is an American singer, author, actress, and entrepreneur. LaBelle began her career in the early 1960s as lead singer and front woman of the vocal group, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles. Following the group’s name change to Labelle in the early 1970s, she released the iconic disco song “Lady Marmalade” and the group later became the first African-American vocal group to land the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.[1] After the group split in 1976, LaBelle began a successful solo career, starting with her critically acclaimed debut album, which included the career-defining song, “You Are My Friend”. LaBelle became a mainstream solo star in 1984 following the success of the singles, “If Only You Knew”, “New Attitude” and “Stir It Up”, with the latter two crossing over to pop audiences becoming radio staples.[1]

Early life and career

Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles

Patti joined a local church choir at the Beulah Baptist Church at ten and performed her first solo two years later, while she also grew up listening to secular music styles such as R&B and jazz music. When she was fifteen, she won a talent competition at her high school. This success led to Patti forming her first singing group, the Ordettes, in 1960, with schoolmates Jean Brown, Yvonne Hogen and Johnnie Dawson.[7] The group, with Patti as front woman, became a local attraction until two of its members left to marry.[8] In 1962, the Ordettes included three new members, Cindy Birdsong, Sarah Dash and Nona Hendryx, the latter two girls having sung for another defunct vocal group.[8] That year, they auditioned for local record label owner Harold Robinson. Robinson agreed to work with the group after Patti began singing the song “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”. Initially Robinson was dismissive of Patti due to him feeling Patti was “too dark and too plain”.[8] Shortly after signing them, he had them record as the Blue Belles and they were selected to promote the recording of “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”, which had been recorded by The Starlets, but was assigned as a Blue Belles single due to label conflict.[8] The Starlets’ manager sued Harold Robinson after the Blue Belles were seen performing a lip-synching version of the song on American Bandstand.[8] After settling out of court, Robinson altered the group’s name to “Patti LaBelle and The Blue Belles”.[8] Initially, a Billboard ad cited the group as “Patti Bell and the Blue Bells”.[9] In 1963, the group scored their first hit single with the ballad “Down the Aisle (The Wedding Song)” which became a crossover top 40 hit on the Billboard pop and R&B charts after King Records issued it. Later in the year, they recorded their rendition of the standard “You’ll Never Walk Alone”; the single was later re-released on Cameo-Parkway Records where the group scored a second hit on the pop charts with the song in 1964. Another charted single, “Danny Boy”, was released that same year. In 1965, after Cameo-Parkway folded, the group moved to New York and signed with Atlantic Records where they recorded twelve singles for the label, including the mildly charted singles “All or Nothing” and “Take Me for a Little While”. The group’s Atlantic tenure included their rendition of “Over the Rainbow” and a version of the song “Groovy Kind of Love”. In 1967, Birdsong left the group to join The Supremes and by 1970 the group had been dropped from Atlantic Records as well as by their longtime manager Bernard Montague. That year, Vicki Wickham, producer of the UK music show, Ready, Steady, Go, agreed to manage the group after Dusty Springfield mentioned signing them. Wickham’s first direction for the group was for them to change their name to simply Labelle and advised the group to renew their act, going for a more homegrown look and sound that reflected psychedelic soul. In 1971, the group opened for The Who in several stops on the group’s U.S. tour.

Labelle signed with the Warner Music imprint, Track Records, and released their self-titled debut album in 1971. The record’s psychedelic soul sound and its blending of rock and soul rhythms was a departure from the group’s early sound. That same year, they sang background vocals on Laura Nyro’s album, Gonna Take a Miracle. A year later, in 1972, the group released Moon Shadow, which repeated the homegrown gritty sound of the previous album. In 1973, influenced by glam rockers David Bowie and Elton John, Wickham had the group dressed in silver space suits and luminescent makeup.[10] After their third successive album, Pressure Cookin’, failed to generate a hit, Labelle signed with Epic Records in 1974, releasing their most successful album to date, with Nightbirds, which blended soul, funk and rock music, thanks to the work of the album’s producer, Allen Toussaint. The single, “Lady Marmalade”, would become their biggest-selling single, going number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over a million copies, as did Nightbirds, which later earned a RIAA gold award, for sales of a million units. In October 1974, Labelle made pop history by becoming the first rock and roll vocal group to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House.[11] Riding high on the success of “Lady Marmalade” and the Nightbirds album, Labelle made the cover of Rolling Stone in 1975. Labelle released two more albums, Chameleon and Phoenix in 1975 and 1976 respectively. While both albums continued the group’s critical success, none of the singles issued on those albums ever crossed over to the pop charts.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-04T10:25:07+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 04 Aug 2018 10:25:07 +0000 31, in black music artists, jazz, music, pop music, r&b

 

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“Dr. John – Accentuate the positive”

Malcolm John Rebennack (born November 21, 1940), better known by his stage name Dr. John, is an American singer and songwriter. His music combines blues, pop, jazz, boogie woogie and rock and roll.

Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive” is a popularsong which was published in 1944. The music was written by Harold Arlen and the lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The song was nominated for the “Academy Award for Best Original Song” at the 18th Academy Awards in 1945 after being used in the film Here Come the Waves. It is sung in the style of a sermon, and explains that accentuating the positive is key to happiness. In describing his inspiration for the lyric, Mercer told the Pop Chronicles radio documentary “[my] publicity agent … went to hear Father Divine and he had a sermon and his subject was ‘you got to accentuate the positive and eliminate the negative.’ And I said ‘Wow, that’s a colorful phrase!'”

Mercer recorded the song, with The Pied Pipers and Paul Weston‘s orchestra, on October 4, 1944, and it was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 180. The record first reached the Billboard magazinecharts on January 4, 1945, and lasted 13 weeks on the chart, peaking at number 2. The song was number five on Billboard’s Annual High School Survey in 1945.

On March 25, 2015, it was announced that Mercer’s version would be inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for the song’s “cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy”.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-08-03T12:40:39+00:00America/Los_Angeles08bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 03 Aug 2018 12:40:39 +0000 31, in blues, jazz, pop music

 

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“New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Lineup”

Image:  Dreamtime.com

Jazz Fest takes place April 27-29 and May 3-6 at the Fair Grounds Race Track, 1751 Gentilly Blvd. Daily tickets to the event are $65 in advance or $80 at the gate. Advance sales end April 26 for the first weekend and May 2 for the second. Admission for children 2-10 is $5; younger kids are free. Special $50 admission at the gate for Louisiana residents on “locals Thursday,” May 3.

 

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ FEST

Aerosmith, Aretha Franklin, Sting, Jimmy Buffett, Beck, Jack White, David Byrne, Lionel Richie and Anita Baker are the brightest of the many stars at this year’s New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Are you jazzed by the lineup? Let us know what you think in the comment stream.

In addition to the stars above, here’s the complete list of 2018 Jazz Fest performers: Bonnie Raitt, Khalid, Sturgill Simpson, Jack Johnson, Sheryl Crow, Common, Cage the Elephant, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, The Revivalists, Steve Miller Band, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Smokey Robinson, Juanes, Lyle Lovett & His Large Band, Toots & The Maytals, Aaron Neville, George Benson, Charlie Wilson, Delbert McClinton, Irma Thomas, Steel Pulse, The Radiators @ 40,

Jon Batiste with The Dap-Kings, Big Freedia, Buddy Guy, Old Crow Medicine Show, Blind Boys of Alabama, John Mayall, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Savion Glover, Leslie Odom Jr., Charles Lloyd & The Marvels with special guest Lucinda Williams, Maze featuring Frankie Beverly, The Fabulous Thunderbirds featuring Kim Wilson, Tamela Mann, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk, Galactic, Better than Ezra, Tab Benoit, Dianne Reeves, Telmary y Habana Sana of Cuba, Los Silver Stars of Honduras, Hezekiah Walker, Ron Carter Trio, Rebirth Brass Band, Tank and the Bangas, The Dirty Dozen Brass Band, The Bounce featuring Cupid, 5th Ward Weebie, DJ Jubilee, Partners-N-Crime, and Ricky B, Archie Shepp Quartet

Anders Osborne, Sona Jobarteh of Gambia, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux & the Golden Eagles, Jupiter & Okwess of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kermit Ruffins’ Tribute to Louis Armstrong, Davell Crawford, Boyfriend, Chocolate Milk, Ruthie Foster, Big Sam’s Funky Nation, Samantha Fish, The Soul Rebels, Sonny Landreth, Sweet Crude,

Jazz Fest celebrates the New Orleans Tricentennial, Walter Trout, Jerron ‘Blind Boy’ Paxton, Pine Leaf Boys, Socks in the Frying Pan of Ireland, Jake Shimabukuro, Sidi Toure of Mali, James Andrews & the Crescent City Allstars, Walter Wolfman Washington & the Roadmasters, George Porter, Jr. & Runnin’ Pardners, Jon Cleary, Terence Blanchard & the E-Collective, Wayne Toups, GIVERS, Cowboy Mouth, Marcia Ball, Calexico, Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, The Last Bandoleros, Doug Kershaw & Friends, Bobby Rush, John Boutte, Hiss Golden Messenger, Zachary Richard, Tribute to Jelly Roll Morton featuring Henry Butler, Darcy Malone & the Tangle,

The Walls Group, Jermaine Landrum & Abundant Praise Revival Choir, Creole Wild West Mardi Gras Indians, Lakou Mizik of Haiti, Imagination Movers, Big Chief Donald Harrison, Kod Kreyol and the Creole Dance Ensemble of Haiti, Furious Five Social Aid & Pleasure Club, Nicholas Payton, Don Vappie’s Tribute to King Oliver, Lost Bayou Ramblers, Lena Prima, John Mooney, Lee Boys, The East Pointers of Canada, Royal Teeth, Roddie Romero & the Hub City All-Stars, Meschiya Lake Remembers Sweet Emma Barrett, Hot 8 Brass Band, Tribute to Fats Domino with special guest Jerry Lee Lewis.

 

Source:  http://www.nola.com/

http://www.frenchquarter.com/new-orleans-jazz-fest-lineup/

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-27T10:10:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 27 Jul 2018 10:10:00 +0000 31, in concerts and events, entertainment, FRENCH FRIDAYS, jazz

 

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Smooth Jazz [Najee – Brazilian Affair] | ♫ ♫

Smooth Jazz [Najee – Brazilian Affair] | ♫ ♫

Featured image: http://activerain.com/blogsview

Brazilian Jazz can refer to both a genre, largely influenced by Bossa Nova, that exists in many nations and the jazz music of Brazil itself.

Bossa Nova and Jazz 

Bossa’s relationship to jazz, and popularity with American jazz musicians, led to Brazilian musicians, such as Airto Moreira and Flora Purim, spending time in the United States and connecting to its jazz scene. Egberto Gismonti and Hermeto Pascoal also had a close association to jazz. This, combined with earlier collaborations between America jazz musicians and bossa nova]artists, also led to “Brazilian jazz” as a kind of genre American musicians, notably Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd played.  

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-20T11:30:52+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 20 Jul 2018 11:30:52 +0000 31, in jazz, latin music, music

 

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