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“Eartha Kitt – Santa Baby (Original) HQ

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“Santa Baby” is a 1953 Christmas song written by Joan Javits (the niece of Senator Jacob K. Javits) and Philip Springer.

The song is a tongue-in-cheek look at a Christmas list addressed to Santa Claus by a woman who wants extravagant gifts such as sables, yachts, and decorations from Tiffany’s.

Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa Baby

 

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“Phoebe Snow~Poetry Man”

“Phoebe Snow~Poetry Man”

Phoebe Snow (born Phoebe Ann Laub; July 17, 1950 – April 26, 2011 was an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist, best known for her 1975 song “Poetry Man”. She was described by The New York Times as a “contralto grounded in a bluesy growl and capable of sweeping over four octaves.”

Professional life

It was at The Bitter End club in 1972 that Denny Cordell, co-owner (with Leon Russell) of Shelter Records, was so taken by the singer that he signed her to the label and produced her first recording. She released an eponymous album, Phoebe Snow, in 1974. Featuring guest performances by The Persuasions, Zoot Sims, Teddy Wilson, David Bromberg, and Dave Mason, Snow’s album went on to sell over a million copies in the United States and became one of the most acclaimed recordings of the era.

This spawned a Top Five single on the Billboard Hot 100 with “Poetry Man” and was itself a Top Five album in Billboard, for which she received a nomination for the Grammy Award for Best New Artist. The cover of Rolling Stone magazine followed, while she performed as the opening act for tours by Jackson Browne and Paul Simon (with whom she recorded the hit single “Gone at Last” in 1975). 1975 also brought the first of several appearances as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live, on which Snow performed both solo and in duets with Paul Simon and Linda Ronstadt. During the 1975 appearance, she was seven months pregnant with her daughter, Valerie. Her backup vocal is heard on Paul Simon’s hit song “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” along with Valerie Simpson and Patti Austin, from 1975. She also duets with him on the song gospel-tinged “Gone At Last”. Both songs appear on Simon’s Grammy-winning 1975 album “Still Crazy After All These Years”.

Legal battles took place between Snow and Shelter Records. Snow ended up signed to Columbia Records. Her second album, Second Childhood, appeared in 1976, produced by Phil Ramone. It was jazzier and more introspective, and was an RIAA Certified Gold Album for Phoebe, with the Gold Album awarded on July 9, 1976.[13] She moved to a more rock-oriented sound for It Looks Like Snow, released later in 1976 with David Rubinson producing. 1977 saw Never Letting Go, again with Ramone, while 1978’s Against the Grain was helmed by Barry Beckett. After that Snow parted ways with Columbia; she would later say that the stress of her parental obligations degraded her ability to make music effectively. In 1979, she toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada with noted guitarist Arlen Roth as her lead guitarist and Musical Director. In 1981, Snow, now signed with Mirage Records, released Rock Away, recorded with members of Billy Joel’s band; it spun off the Top 50 hit “Games”.

The 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide summed up Snow’s career so far by saying: “One of the most gifted voices of her generation, Phoebe Snow can do just about anything stylistically as well as technically … The question that’s still unanswered is how best to channel such talent.” Snow spent long periods away from recording, often singing commercial jingles for AT&T and others in order to support herself and her daughter.Later, in the 1990s, Snow’s voice was featured on commercials for Cotton Incorporated and their The Fabric of Our Lives campaign. During the 1980s she also battled her own life-threatening illness.Snow sang the theme song for NBC’s A Different World during the show’s first season (1987–88).

Snow returned to recording with Something Real in 1989 and gathered a few more hits on the Adult Contemporary charts. Also, Snow composed the Detroit’s WDIV-TV Go 4 It! campaign in 1980. She sang Ancient Places, Sacred Lands composed by Steve Horelick on Reading Rainbow’s tenth episode The Gift of the Sacred Dog which was based on the book by Paul Goble and narrated by actor Michael Ansara. It was shot in Crow Agency, Montana in 1983.

Snow performed in 1989 on stage at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City as part of Our Common Future, a five-hour live television broadcast originating from several countries.

In 1990, she contributed a cover version of the Delaney & Bonnie song “Get Ourselves Together” to the Elektra compilation Rubáiyát which included Earth Wind & Fire guitarist Dick Smith. In 1992, she toured with Donald Fagen’s New York Rock and Soul Revue and was featured on the group’s album recorded live at the Beacon Theater in New York City. Throughout the 1990s she made numerous appearances on the Howard Stern radio show. She sang live for specials and birthday shows. In 1997, she sang the Roseanne theme song a cappella during the closing moments of the final episode.

In 1995, Snow participated in The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True at the Lincoln Center in New York City. In addition to Ms. Snow, the Concert featured performances by Jewel, Joel Grey, Roger Daltrey, Jackson Browne amongst others. Snow sang a very distinctive medley of “If I Only had a Brain; a Heart; the Nerve”. An album of the concert was released on Compact Disc on Rhino Records as catalog number R2 72405.

Snow joined the pop group, Zap Mama, who recorded its own version of “Poetry Man,” in an impromptu duet on the PBS series, “Sessions At West 54th.” Hawaiian girl group Na Leo also had a hit on the Adult Contemporary chart in 1999 with their cover version of “Poetry Man”.

In May 1998, Snow received the Cultural Achievement Award by New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. She was also the recipient of a Don Kirschner Rock Award, several Playboy Music Poll Awards, New York Music Awards and the Clio Award.

Snow performed for U.S. President Bill Clinton, First Lady Hillary Clinton, and his cabinet at Camp David in 1999.

In 2003, Snow released her album Natural Wonder on Eagle Records, containing ten original tracks, her first original material in fourteen years. Snow performed at Howard Stern’s wedding in 2008, and made a special appearance in the film Noah’s Arc: Jumping the Broom as herself. Some of her music was also featured on the soundtrack of the film. Her Live album (2008) featured many of her hits as well as a cover of “Piece of My Heart”.

Death

Phoebe Snow suffered a cerebral hemorrhage on January 19, 2010 and slipped into a coma,enduring bouts of blood clots, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure. Snow died on April 26, 2011 at age 60 in Edison, New Jersey.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

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“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

Chameleon is the sixth album by American singing trio Labelle. Though Patti LaBelle’s autobiography Don’t Block The Blessings revealed that LaBelle planned a follow-up to Chameleon entitled Shaman, the album never materialized. The trio would not release another new recording until 2008’s Back to Now. The final album was moderately successful peaking at #94 at the Pop charts and #21 on the R&B charts. Only two singles made the charts which were “Get You Somebody New” which peaked at #50 on the Pop charts and their memorable song “Isn’t It A Shame” which debuted at #18 on the R&B charts. “Isn’t It A Shame” was later sampled by Nelly on his 2004 hit, “My Place”, which featured Jaheim.

Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patti LaBelle, is an American singer, author, actress, and entrepreneur. LaBelle began her career in the early 1960s as lead singer and front woman of the vocal group, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles. Following the group’s name change to Labelle in the early 1970s, she released the iconic disco song “Lady Marmalade” and the group later became the first African-American vocal group to land the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.[1] After the group split in 1976, LaBelle began a successful solo career, starting with her critically acclaimed debut album, which included the career-defining song, “You Are My Friend”. LaBelle became a mainstream solo star in 1984 following the success of the singles, “If Only You Knew”, “New Attitude” and “Stir It Up”, with the latter two crossing over to pop audiences becoming radio staples.[1]

Early life and career

Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles

Patti joined a local church choir at the Beulah Baptist Church at ten and performed her first solo two years later, while she also grew up listening to secular music styles such as R&B and jazz music. When she was fifteen, she won a talent competition at her high school. This success led to Patti forming her first singing group, the Ordettes, in 1960, with schoolmates Jean Brown, Yvonne Hogen and Johnnie Dawson.[7] The group, with Patti as front woman, became a local attraction until two of its members left to marry.[8] In 1962, the Ordettes included three new members, Cindy Birdsong, Sarah Dash and Nona Hendryx, the latter two girls having sung for another defunct vocal group.[8] That year, they auditioned for local record label owner Harold Robinson. Robinson agreed to work with the group after Patti began singing the song “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”. Initially Robinson was dismissive of Patti due to him feeling Patti was “too dark and too plain”.[8] Shortly after signing them, he had them record as the Blue Belles and they were selected to promote the recording of “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”, which had been recorded by The Starlets, but was assigned as a Blue Belles single due to label conflict.[8] The Starlets’ manager sued Harold Robinson after the Blue Belles were seen performing a lip-synching version of the song on American Bandstand.[8] After settling out of court, Robinson altered the group’s name to “Patti LaBelle and The Blue Belles”.[8] Initially, a Billboard ad cited the group as “Patti Bell and the Blue Bells”.[9] In 1963, the group scored their first hit single with the ballad “Down the Aisle (The Wedding Song)” which became a crossover top 40 hit on the Billboard pop and R&B charts after King Records issued it. Later in the year, they recorded their rendition of the standard “You’ll Never Walk Alone”; the single was later re-released on Cameo-Parkway Records where the group scored a second hit on the pop charts with the song in 1964. Another charted single, “Danny Boy”, was released that same year. In 1965, after Cameo-Parkway folded, the group moved to New York and signed with Atlantic Records where they recorded twelve singles for the label, including the mildly charted singles “All or Nothing” and “Take Me for a Little While”. The group’s Atlantic tenure included their rendition of “Over the Rainbow” and a version of the song “Groovy Kind of Love”. In 1967, Birdsong left the group to join The Supremes and by 1970 the group had been dropped from Atlantic Records as well as by their longtime manager Bernard Montague. That year, Vicki Wickham, producer of the UK music show, Ready, Steady, Go, agreed to manage the group after Dusty Springfield mentioned signing them. Wickham’s first direction for the group was for them to change their name to simply Labelle and advised the group to renew their act, going for a more homegrown look and sound that reflected psychedelic soul. In 1971, the group opened for The Who in several stops on the group’s U.S. tour.

Labelle signed with the Warner Music imprint, Track Records, and released their self-titled debut album in 1971. The record’s psychedelic soul sound and its blending of rock and soul rhythms was a departure from the group’s early sound. That same year, they sang background vocals on Laura Nyro’s album, Gonna Take a Miracle. A year later, in 1972, the group released Moon Shadow, which repeated the homegrown gritty sound of the previous album. In 1973, influenced by glam rockers David Bowie and Elton John, Wickham had the group dressed in silver space suits and luminescent makeup.[10] After their third successive album, Pressure Cookin’, failed to generate a hit, Labelle signed with Epic Records in 1974, releasing their most successful album to date, with Nightbirds, which blended soul, funk and rock music, thanks to the work of the album’s producer, Allen Toussaint. The single, “Lady Marmalade”, would become their biggest-selling single, going number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over a million copies, as did Nightbirds, which later earned a RIAA gold award, for sales of a million units. In October 1974, Labelle made pop history by becoming the first rock and roll vocal group to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House.[11] Riding high on the success of “Lady Marmalade” and the Nightbirds album, Labelle made the cover of Rolling Stone in 1975. Labelle released two more albums, Chameleon and Phoenix in 1975 and 1976 respectively. While both albums continued the group’s critical success, none of the singles issued on those albums ever crossed over to the pop charts.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2017 in black music artists, jazz, music, pop music, r&b

 

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Maria MULDAUR – (bluegrass) Don’t You Feel My Leg

Maria MULDAUR – (bluegrass) Don’t You Feel My Leg

From her early 1960s jug band recordings to the present day, Maria Muldaur stands unique in her ability to transcend categorization. For over forty years, Muldaur has shared her deep love of roots music. By carefully selecting her repertoire from the best North American songwriters, she has encompassed the blues of the Mississippi Delta, New Orleans gospel and jazz, Western Swing, Appalachian bluegrass/country and everything in between. Best known for her 1973 hit, “Midnight At The Oasis,” Muldaur has always been much more than a sexy one-hit wonder. Blessed with a voice that remains convincing regardless of the genre she chooses to tackle, her performances are a study in American musicology.

This performance, recorded at the legendary Trobadour in Los Angeles, followed the release of Maria Muldaur’s second solo album, Waitress In A Donut Shop. Unlike the majority of her live performances from this classic era, it captures one of the handful of concerts where she was not backed by her usual band of hippie renegades. Instead, this rare performance features Muldaur accompanied by seasoned jazz musicians, who provide an infectious big band feel that swings in all the right places.

None other than the legendary Benny Carter directed Muldaur’s band on this run. Admired as virtually any jazz musician ever, Carter was a contemporary of Duke Ellington (who he played with early in his career) and Count Basie and was universally respected for his abilities as a composer, musician and bandleader. Muldaur’s ensemble on this night featured the likes of Harry “Sweets” Edison and Snooky Young on trumpets and trombonist extraordinaire, J. J. Johnson. This set also captures Muldaur at her commercial peak, performing genre-breaking music with a stellar big band before a very appreciative audience.

Right from the start, Muldaur sets a swinging mood, opening with her take on Fats Waller’s “Squeeze Me,” followed by Jimmy Rogers’ classic “Any Old Time,” a song she recorded on her self-titled first album. The bluesy “Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You,” follows. Here Muldaur finds the perfect balance between sweet and sexy, with the musicians providing the perfect backdrop. Up next is “Sweetheart,” the song that contained the lyric that provided the title of her album, Waitress In A Donut Shop. This was one of two songs that Benny Carter and his band actually recorded on that album. Hearing a live rendition, featuring virtually the same musicians as the studio session, is quite the treat. Following this, Muldaur takes a break and encourages the band to do their own thing on Benny Carter’s original composition, “Doozy.”

By this point, everyone is well warmed up and the set kicks into high gear. The classic “It Don’t Mean A Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” is a perfect vehicle for Muldaur, taking the performance to the next level. This is such an obvious match, that one can only wonder why she didn’t record it for the album. Her smoldering take on Billy Holliday’s “Lover Man (Where Can You Be)” slows things down, while digging deeper into the emotional nuances of her voice. Her charm is undeniable and the performance is thoroughly engaging. Muldaur wouldn’t get around to releasing this song until almost a decade later. This performance easily stands up to her finest material from this era.

https://tinyurl.com/y98kz8eq



 
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Posted by on November 17, 2017 in 1960s, blues, folk music, jazz, other

 

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Yael Naim – “Dream In My Head” 

Yael Naïm (Hebrewיעל נעים‎‎, born 6 February 1978 in Paris, France), is an IsraeliFrench singer-songwriter. She rose to fame in 2008 in the US after her hit single “New Soul” was used by Apple in an advertising campaign for its MacBook Air. The song peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100.

BiographyEdit

Yael Naïm was born in ParisFrance to Sephardic Jewish immigrants from Tunisia. At the age of four, she moved with her family to Ramat HaSharon, Israel, where she spent the rest of her childhood. She served in the Israel Defense Forces as a soloist in the Israeli Air Force Orchestra.[1]

She began her singing career with a part in the musical Les Dix Commandements[2] and her first solo album, In a Man’s Womb (recorded in Los Angeles with Kamil Rustam), was released in 2001. She also sang the song “You Disappear” by Bruno Coulais for the film Harrison’s Flowers. In her early work, she was credited simply as Yaël. She also performed a duet with Din Din Aviv titled “Mashmauyot”.[3]

Naïm joined with percussionist David Donatien and, over a period of two years, they arranged and recorded thirteen of Naïm’s songs in a studio in her apartment in Paris.[4] These were released as her second album, Yael Naïm, on 22 October 2007, on the Tôt ou tard label. The songs are in French, English and Hebrew and received critical acclaim.[2] The album entered the French album chart at No. 11 the week after its release. Her style has been described as having a touch of folk and a touch of jazz, with mysterious and evocative words sung with a delicate and intentionally husky voice.[5]

In January 2008, Apple featured her song “New Soul” in its debut commercial for the MacBook Air laptop. Steve Jobs himself picked the song for the launch of the laptop line.[6][7][8] Owing to high U.S. digital sales, the song debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 for the chart week of 16 February 2008, at No. 9, becoming Naïm’s first U.S. top ten single, and making her the first Israeli solo artist to ever have a top ten hit in the United States. “New Soul” moved up to No. 7 the following week. The song was also featured on the soundtrack of the movies The House Bunny and Wild Target.

Her third album was released in November 2010. The first single from this new record was “Go to the River”.

 
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Posted by on October 27, 2017 in jazz, music

 

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“Dedication – Noora Noor” 



Noora Noor aka Noora (born 8 July 1979) is a Somalian-Norwegian neo soul singer.[1]

Noor started early on her musical journey, performing locally from the age of 8. She got a recording contract with Warner Music at only 15. She then began working with Stargate (production team) to make her first album. The success of the album launched Stargate’s international career as R&B/Soul producers.

Noor’s debut album, Curious, was released in 1999 and became one of the first notable Scandinavian R&B albums. The single “Need You” was also played constantly on “The Lick” on MTVCurious became a success also in Japan with more than 40,000 sales. It took five years until the release of her second album, All I Am, in 2004, as Noor became seriously ill. The album included more self-penned songs, written in collaboration with US and UK songwriters. She is also featured on Madcon‘s 2007 album So Dark the Con of Man and some Tommy Tee releases. In addition, Noor played Maria Magdalen in a big outdoor version of Jesus Christ Superstar.

Her most recent album, Soul Deep, was released in Norway in March 2009 to rave reviews (6 on the dice in Norway’s major daily VG). Recorded in San Jose, California, with local blues and soul musicians, it also features members of Little Charlie & The Nightcats. The producer was Kid Andersen, the Norwegian band’s guitar virtuoso. The album was released outside Norway during 2010, with the first single, in Benelux, made available in April/May 2010.

In March 2011, Noor participated in the Norwegian national selection for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011, the Melodi Grand Prix, with the song “Gone with the wind”

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on October 19, 2017 in blues, jazz

 

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Enjoy the music and work of “Jazz blues artist and painter Karen Hollowell” 

Enjoy the music and work of “Jazz blues artist and painter Karen Hollowell” 

Image: bluesbetty.com/jukejoint

“Music is my passion, and I am deeply motivated to shining a light on the power of blues and jazz— both which have influenced so many other styles of popular music.  My paintings strive to capture a moment within a tune: a wailing guitar solo, a haunting trumpet or a quiet moment after a big crescendo.”

Karen Hollowell graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. She spent a year in London, England studying with Edward Booth-Clibborn, Pentagram Design and various artists-in-residence.

Focusing on a commercial art career, Karen became an award-winning Designer and Art Director, working with a diverse range of clients including: Rhino Video, Educational Insights, Disney Publishing and The Smithsonian Institute. 

Karen’s works have been exhibited in both Canada and the U.S., including Vancouver, New Orleans and Memphis.

bluesbetty.com

 

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