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Hawaii Jazz and Blues Festival 

 

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“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

Armando Rehia Dante Castagnoli was born in Tahiti to an Italian father and Tahitian mother. The third of seven children, his father was a strict taskmaster when it came to his children’s music, and “Mando” and his brothers would march several miles every Sunday playing their instruments before they got to play in the ocean with their friends. That early discipline paid off and Armando’s obvious gifts as a saxophone player and musician were encouraged by Professors from the Music Conservatory of Paris. When his family moved to Powell River B.CAfter graduation Mando moved to Toronto and studied at Humber College with world famous teacher, Pat LaBarbera, who played with Buddy Rich, Woody Herman and the legendary Elvin Jones. In 1984 Armando won the highest award at the BC WOODWIND FINALS.
Mando recorded his first CD, THE BUBBLEHEADS, at the age of 20 and for the next six years was active in the Toronto music scene playing Jazz, Blues, and R&B and becoming proficient at alto, tenor, and soprano saxophone as well as flute and percussion.

In the 90′s Armando acted as the musical director and featured soloist at the famous CLUB NEW ORLEANS in Papeete, Tahiti, and had the opportunity to work with greats like Nathan East, Jimmie Earl, Freddie Ravel, and many more. His collaboration with jazz singer, Chris Bennett, took him to Berlin, Germany and live recordings and guest appearances at the A-TRANE, one of the world’s great jazz clubs. His soldout appearances in Berlin and Los Angeles hi-lite Mando’s unique and beautiful tone, sometimes compared to Stan Getz, as well as his incredible showmanship.

With homebase in his island paradise of Tahiti, Mando now occasionally tours the world with stars such as Otmaro Ruiz, Felix Vilchez,Chris Bennett and more. He has recorded with the legendary Leon Ware and has produced and written several of his own CDs including DANCE FOR PLANET EARTH, now available at CD Baby and I-Tunes. The title cut, AORI NO TE FENUA, is the theme song for the TAHITI MUSIC FESTIVAL. Produced by Armando Castagnoli and Chris Bennett, the 2012 festival will raise awareness of how we can save our oceans and islands such as Tahiti and will bring musicians from all over the world together in unity and celebration.
http://armandocastagnoli.com/bio/


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 “Bourbon Street Blues” 

Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an Italian-American singer, actor, songwriter, bandleader, and trumpeter. While rooted in New Orleans jazz, swing music, and jump blues, Prima touched on various genres throughout his career: he formed a seven-piece New Orleans-style jazz band in the late 1920s, fronted a swing combo in the 1930s and a big band group in the 1940s, helped to popularize jump blues in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s, and performed as a Vegaslounge act in the late 1950s and 1960s.

From the 1940s through the 1960s, his music further encompassed early R&B and rock’n’rollboogie-woogie, and even Italian folk music, such as the tarantella. Prima made prominent use of Italian music and language in his songs, blending elements of his Italian identity with jazz and swing music. At a time when “ethnic” musicians were often discouraged from openly stressing their ethnicity, Prima’s conspicuous embrace of his Italian ethnicity opened the doors for other Italian-American and “ethnic” American musicians to display their ethnic roots.[1][2]

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“Zaz – Je veux/I want  (Studio version, HD)” 

Isabelle Geffroy[1] (born 1 May 1980 in Tours, France), better known by the nickname Zaz, is a French singer-songwriter who mixes jazzy stylesFrench varietysoul and acoustic. She is famous for her hit “Je veux”, from her first album, Zaz, released on 10 May 2010.[2]She has sold over 3.4 million albums worldwide and is currently one of the most successful French singers in the world.

In 2001, she started her singing career in the blues band “Fifty Fingers”. She sang in musical groups in Angoulême, especially in a jazz quintet.[4] She became one of the four singers of Izar-Adatz (Basque for “Shooting Star”), a variety band which consisted of sixteen people with whom she toured for two years, especially in the Midi-Pyrenees and the Basque Country. She worked in the studio as a backing singer in Toulouse and performed with many singers, including Maeso, Art Mengo, Vladimir Max, Jean-Pierre Mader, Eduardo Sanguinetti, the latinoamerican philosopher and land-artist,[5] and Serge Guerao.

In 2011, Zaz won an EBBA Award. Every year the European Border Breakers Awards EBBA recognize the success of ten emerging artists or groups who reached audiences outside their own countries with their first internationally released album in the past year.

In May 2010, French magazine Télérama announced: “Rumor has swelled in recent weeks: Zaz is an extraordinary voice, and she will be the revelation of the summer!”.[6] On 10 May 2010, Zaz released her first album. It contains songs she wrote (“Trop sensible”) and co-composed (“Les passants”, “Le long de la route”, “Prends garde à ta langue”, “J’aime à nouveau”, “Ni oui ni non”). Kerredine Soltani produced the album on the label “Play On” and wrote and composed the hit single “Je veux”. The pop singer Raphaël Haroche wrote her songs “Éblouie par la nuit”, “Port Coton” and “La fée”. In 2010, she signed a contract for her tours with Caramba and publisher Sony ATV. She was invited to make several television appearances (such as Taratata or Chabada) and was featured in several programs on the radio. On Sunday 6 October 2013, Zaz appeared on BBC One‘s The Andrew Marr Show in London and sang “Je veux” live.

Zaz then toured France (Paris, La Rochelle, MontaubanSaint-Ouen, Chateauroux, LanderneauFécamp…), performed at the Francofolies of Montreal (Canada), and sang in Monthey (Switzerland), Brussels, Berlin, and Milan. In autumn Zaz topped the charts in Belgium, Switzerland, and Austria. Matthieu Baligand, her manager and producer at Caramba Entertainment, explained to Libération: “We talk a lot of her right now and people are waiting her at the turn… Despite the demand, it seems preferable to do her first tour in fifty small places which will render her credible. Zaz is a popular, intuitive artist, who is familiar with music, who can sing, but doing a quality show is something else (…).” In November 2010, the debut album Zaz became double platinum and she was awarded “Revelation Song” by the Académie Charles Cros. Zaz also won the European Border Breakers Award: she was named the French artist most played abroad in 2010. According to a survey published by L’Internaute, Zaz was the most popular French singer in the 2010 ranking.[7]

She is also featured on the song “Coeur Volant” for the soundtrack of the 2011 film, Hugo. Her live CD and DVD Zaz live tour Sans Tsu Tsou was revealed.

Her song “Eblouie Par La Nuit” was featured in the 2013 American neo-noir crime thriller, “Dead Man Down”.

In 2012, Zaz went on tour and held concerts in various countries around the world including Japan, Canada, Germany, Poland, Switzerland, Slovenia, Czech Republic (Colours of Ostrava), Croatia, Bulgaria, Serbia, and Turkey, among other countries.[8]

With her album Paris she won the 2015 Echo award for best international female rock/pop artist.[9]

LYRICS IN ENGLISH


I want (Je veux)

Give me a suite at the Ritz hotel, I don’t want that

Chanel’s jewellery, I don’t want that

Give me a limo, what would I do with it?

Offer me staff, what would I do with it?

A mansion in Neufchatel, it’s not for me

Offer me the Eiffel tower, what would I do with it?

 

I want love, joy, good spirit

It’s not your money that will make me happy

I want to die with a hand on my heart

Let’s go together, let’s discover my freedom,

Forget all your prejudice, welcome to my reality

 

I’m fed up with your good manners, it’s too much for me

I eat with my hands, I’m like that

I speak loud and I’m direct, sorry

Let’s end the hypocrisy, I’m out of it

I’m tired of double-talks

Look at me, I’m not even mad at you, I’m just like that

 

I want love, joy, good spirit

It’s not your money that will make me happy

I want to die with a hand on my heart

Let’s go together, let’s discover my freedom,

Forget all your prejudice, welcome to my reality

 
 

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“Charlie Musselwhite – Blue Steel” 

Charles Douglas “Charlie” Musselwhite (born January 31, 1944) is an American electric blues harmonica player and bandleader,[1] one of the non-black bluesmen who came to prominence in the early 1960s, along with Mike Bloomfield and Paul Butterfield, or bands such as Canned Heat. Though he has often been identified as a “white bluesman”,[2][3] he claims Native American heritage. Musselwhite was reportedly the inspiration for the character played by Dan Aykroyd in the Blues Brothers.[4]

Musselwhite was born in Kosciusko, Mississippi. He has said that he is of Choctaw descent, born in a region originally inhabited by the Choctaw. In a 2005 interview, he said his mother had told him he was actually Cherokee.[5] His family considered it natural to play music. His father played guitar and harmonica, his mother played piano, and a relative was a one-man band.

At the age of three, Musselwhite moved to Memphis, Tennessee. When he was a teenager, Memphis experienced the period when rockabillywestern swing, and electric blues and other forms of African-American music were combining to give birth to rock and roll. That period featured Elvis PresleyJerry Lee LewisJohnny Cash, and lesser-known musicians such as Gus CannonFurry LewisWill Shade, and Johnny Burnette. Musselwhite supported himself by digging ditches, laying concrete and running moonshine in a 1950 Lincoln automobile. This environment was a school for music as well as life for Musselwhite, who eventually acquired the nickname Memphis Charlie.[6]

In true bluesman fashion, Musselwhite then took off in search of the rumored “big-paying factory jobs” up the “Hillbilly Highway”, Highway 51 to Chicago, where he continued his education on the South Side, making the acquaintance of even more legends, including Lew SoloffMuddy WatersJunior WellsSonny Boy WilliamsonBuddy GuyHowlin’ WolfLittle Walter, and Big Walter Horton. Musselwhite immersed himself completely in the musical life, living in the basement of and occasionally working at Jazz Record Mart (the record store operated by Delmark Records founder Bob Koester) with Big Joe Williams and working as a driver for an exterminator, which allowed him to observe what was happening around the city’s clubs and bars. He spent his time hanging out at the Jazz Record Mart, at the corner of State and Grand, and a nearby bar, Mr. Joe’s, with the city’s blues musicians, and sitting in with Williams and others in the clubs, playing for tips. There he forged a lifelong friendship with John Lee Hooker; though Hooker lived in Detroit, Michigan, the two often visited each other, and Hooker served as best man at Musselwhite’s third marriage. Gradually Musselwhite became well known around town.

In time, Musselwhite led his own blues band, and after Elektra Records‘ success with Paul Butterfield, he released the legendary album Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Band in 1966 on Vanguard Records to immediate and great success.[3][7] He took advantage of the clout this album gave him to move to San Francisco, where, instead of being one of many competing blues acts, he held court as the king of the blues in the exploding countercultural music scene, an exotic and gritty figure to the flower children. Musselwhite even convinced Hooker to move to California.

Since then, Musselwhite has released over 20 albums and has been a guest performer on albums by many other musicians, such as Bonnie Raitt‘s Longing in Their Hearts and the Blind Boys of Alabama‘s Spirit of the Century, both winners of Grammy awards. He also performed on Tom Waits‘s Mule Variations and INXS‘s Suicide Blonde. He has won 14 W. C. Handy Awards, has been nominated for six Grammy awards. received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Monterey Blues Festival and the San Javier Jazz Festival, in San Javier, Spain, and received the Mississippi Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

In 1979, Musselwhite recorded The Harmonica According to Charlie Musselwhite in London for Kicking Mule Records, intended to accompany an instructional book; the album became so popular that it was released on CD. In June 2008, Blind Pig Records reissued the album on 180-gram vinyl with new cover art.[8]

 

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 “Miles Davis – Nuit Sur Les Champs-Elysees (Night On The Champs-Elysees)” 

Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. He is among the most influential and acclaimed figures in the history of jazz and 20th century music. Davis adopted a variety of musical directions in his five-decade career which kept him at the forefront of a number of major stylistic developments in jazz.[1]

Born and raised in Illinois, Davis left his studies at The Juilliard School in New York City and made his professional debut as a member of saxophonist Charlie Parker’s bebop quintet from 1944 to 1948. Shortly after, he recorded the Birth of the Cool sessions for Capitol Records, which were instrumental to the development of cool jazz. In the early 1950s, Davis recorded some of the earliest hard bop music while on Prestige Records but did so haphazardly due to a heroin addiction. After a widely acclaimed comeback performance at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1955, he signed a long-term contract with Columbia Records and recorded the 1957 album ‘Round About Midnight.[2] It was his first work with saxophonist John Coltrane and bassist Paul Chambers, key members of the sextet he led into the early 1960s. During this period, he alternated between orchestral jazz collaborations with arranger Gil Evans, such as the Spanish music-influenced Sketches of Spain (1960), and band recordings, such as Milestones (1958) and Kind of Blue (1959).[3] The latter recording remains one of the most popular jazz albums of all time,[4] selling over 4 million copies in the US.

Davis made several line-up changes while recording Someday My Prince Will Come (1961), his 1961 Blackhawk concerts, and Seven Steps to Heaven (1963), another mainstream success that introduced bassist Ron Carter, pianist Herbie Hancock, and drummer Tony Williams.[3] After adding saxophonist Wayne Shorter to his new quintet in 1964,[3] Davis led them on a series of more abstract recordings often composed by the band members, helping pioneer the post-bop genre with albums such as E.S.P (1965) and Miles Smiles (1967),[5] before transitioning into his electric period. During the 1970s, he radically experimented with rock, funk, African rhythms, emerging electronic music technology, and an ever-changing line-up of musicians, including keyboardist Joe Zawinul, drummer Al Foster, and guitarist John McLaughlin.[6] This period, beginning with Davis’ 1969 studio album In a Silent Way and concluding with the 1975 concert recording Agharta, was the most controversial in his career, alienating and challenging many in jazz.[7] His million-selling 1970 record Bitches Brew helped spark a resurgence in the genre’s commercial popularity with jazz fusion as the decade progressed.[8]

After a five-year retirement due to poor health, Davis resumed his career in the 1980s, employing younger musicians and pop music sounds on albums such as The Man with the Horn (1981) and Tutu (1986). Critics were generally unreceptive but the decade garnered the trumpeter his highest level of commercial recognition. He performed sold-out concerts worldwide while branching out into visual arts, film, and television work, before his death in 1991 from the combined effects of a stroke, pneumonia and respiratory failure.[9] In 2006, Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,[10] which recognized him as “one of the key figures in the history of jazz”.[10] Rolling Stone described him as “the most revered jazz trumpeter of all time, not to mention one of the most important musicians of the 20th century,”[9] while Gerald Early called him inarguably one of the most influential and innovative musicians of that period.[11]

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Posted by on April 28, 2017 in FRENCH FRIDAYS, jazz

 

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“Phoebe Snow~Poetry Man”

“Phoebe Snow~Poetry Man”

Phoebe Snow (born Phoebe Ann Laub; July 17, 1950 – April 26, 2011 was an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist, best known for her 1975 song “Poetry Man”. She was described by The New York Times as a “contralto grounded in a bluesy growl and capable of sweeping over four octaves.”

Professional life

It was at The Bitter End club in 1972 that Denny Cordell, co-owner (with Leon Russell) of Shelter Records, was so taken by the singer that he signed her to the label and produced her first recording. She released an eponymous album, Phoebe Snow, in 1974. Featuring guest performances by The Persuasions, Zoot Sims, Teddy Wilson, David Bromberg, and Dave Mason, Snow’s album went on to sell over a million copies in the United States and became one of the most acclaimed recordings of the era.

This spawned a Top Five single on the Billboard Hot 100 with “Poetry Man” and was itself a Top Five album in Billboard, for which she received a nomination for the Grammy Award for Best New Artist. The cover of Rolling Stone magazine followed, while she performed as the opening act for tours by Jackson Browne and Paul Simon (with whom she recorded the hit single “Gone at Last” in 1975). 1975 also brought the first of several appearances as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live, on which Snow performed both solo and in duets with Paul Simon and Linda Ronstadt. During the 1975 appearance, she was seven months pregnant with her daughter, Valerie. Her backup vocal is heard on Paul Simon’s hit song “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” along with Valerie Simpson and Patti Austin, from 1975. She also duets with him on the song gospel-tinged “Gone At Last”. Both songs appear on Simon’s Grammy-winning 1975 album “Still Crazy After All These Years”.

Legal battles took place between Snow and Shelter Records. Snow ended up signed to Columbia Records. Her second album, Second Childhood, appeared in 1976, produced by Phil Ramone. It was jazzier and more introspective, and was an RIAA Certified Gold Album for Phoebe, with the Gold Album awarded on July 9, 1976.[13] She moved to a more rock-oriented sound for It Looks Like Snow, released later in 1976 with David Rubinson producing. 1977 saw Never Letting Go, again with Ramone, while 1978’s Against the Grain was helmed by Barry Beckett. After that Snow parted ways with Columbia; she would later say that the stress of her parental obligations degraded her ability to make music effectively. In 1979, she toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada with noted guitarist Arlen Roth as her lead guitarist and Musical Director. In 1981, Snow, now signed with Mirage Records, released Rock Away, recorded with members of Billy Joel’s band; it spun off the Top 50 hit “Games”.

The 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide summed up Snow’s career so far by saying: “One of the most gifted voices of her generation, Phoebe Snow can do just about anything stylistically as well as technically … The question that’s still unanswered is how best to channel such talent.” Snow spent long periods away from recording, often singing commercial jingles for AT&T and others in order to support herself and her daughter.Later, in the 1990s, Snow’s voice was featured on commercials for Cotton Incorporated and their The Fabric of Our Lives campaign. During the 1980s she also battled her own life-threatening illness.Snow sang the theme song for NBC’s A Different World during the show’s first season (1987–88).

Snow returned to recording with Something Real in 1989 and gathered a few more hits on the Adult Contemporary charts. Also, Snow composed the Detroit’s WDIV-TV Go 4 It! campaign in 1980. She sang Ancient Places, Sacred Lands composed by Steve Horelick on Reading Rainbow’s tenth episode The Gift of the Sacred Dog which was based on the book by Paul Goble and narrated by actor Michael Ansara. It was shot in Crow Agency, Montana in 1983.

Snow performed in 1989 on stage at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City as part of Our Common Future, a five-hour live television broadcast originating from several countries.

In 1990, she contributed a cover version of the Delaney & Bonnie song “Get Ourselves Together” to the Elektra compilation Rubáiyát which included Earth Wind & Fire guitarist Dick Smith. In 1992, she toured with Donald Fagen’s New York Rock and Soul Revue and was featured on the group’s album recorded live at the Beacon Theater in New York City. Throughout the 1990s she made numerous appearances on the Howard Stern radio show. She sang live for specials and birthday shows. In 1997, she sang the Roseanne theme song a cappella during the closing moments of the final episode.

In 1995, Snow participated in The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True at the Lincoln Center in New York City. In addition to Ms. Snow, the Concert featured performances by Jewel, Joel Grey, Roger Daltrey, Jackson Browne amongst others. Snow sang a very distinctive medley of “If I Only had a Brain; a Heart; the Nerve”. An album of the concert was released on Compact Disc on Rhino Records as catalog number R2 72405.

Snow joined the pop group, Zap Mama, who recorded its own version of “Poetry Man,” in an impromptu duet on the PBS series, “Sessions At West 54th.” Hawaiian girl group Na Leo also had a hit on the Adult Contemporary chart in 1999 with their cover version of “Poetry Man”.

In May 1998, Snow received the Cultural Achievement Award by New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. She was also the recipient of a Don Kirschner Rock Award, several Playboy Music Poll Awards, New York Music Awards and the Clio Award.

Snow performed for U.S. President Bill Clinton, First Lady Hillary Clinton, and his cabinet at Camp David in 1999.

In 2003, Snow released her album Natural Wonder on Eagle Records, containing ten original tracks, her first original material in fourteen years. Snow performed at Howard Stern’s wedding in 2008, and made a special appearance in the film Noah’s Arc: Jumping the Broom as herself. Some of her music was also featured on the soundtrack of the film. Her Live album (2008) featured many of her hits as well as a cover of “Piece of My Heart”.

Death

Phoebe Snow suffered a cerebral hemorrhage on January 19, 2010 and slipped into a coma,enduring bouts of blood clots, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure. Snow died on April 26, 2011 at age 60 in Edison, New Jersey.

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