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Category Archives: jazz

“Morning Coffee” Jesper Munk

Jesper was born in Munich as the son of Dane Helle Munk and the musician Rainer Germann (Marionetz, Cat Sun Flower). He started playing the guitar at the age of 15 and since 2010 plays in the band Lila’s Riot. After graduating from the Städtische Luisengymnasium Munich, he also began a solo career, performed on the street and regularly at the Fish’n Blues events of the Munich Glockenbach workshop in the Glockenbachviertel. The original street musician was discovered by music editors of Bayerischer Rundfunk.

On June 14, 2013, his debut album For My Way appeared. The album was played by Jesper Munk together with Lila’s Riot bandmate and drummer Clemens Finck von Finckenstein and his as advisor, bassist and co-producer Jesper Munk as Band also on stage performances. [6]

The ZDF called Jesper Munk in the context of a television appearance as “Germany’s hyped blues act” and the youth magazine Bravo saw him as the “only rediscovery” and added: In autumn 2013, Jesper Munk went on tour and to hear war on the show by Harald Schmidt, from now on more TV appearances in well-known shows. At the end of 2013 Jesper Munk toured as an opening act on Eric Burdon’s tour of Germany. [8th]

Jon Spencer, Mocky and Sepalot involved.

End of April 2018, the third studio album Munks came out at Warner Music Germany.

 
 

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“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

“BORA BORA Feat Armando & Memphis – “MANDO SAX” 

Armando Rehia Dante Castagnoli was born in Tahiti to an Italian father and Tahitian mother. The third of seven children, his father was a strict taskmaster when it came to his children’s music, and “Mando” and his brothers would march several miles every Sunday playing their instruments before they got to play in the ocean with their friends. That early discipline paid off and Armando’s obvious gifts as a saxophone player and musician were encouraged by Professors from the Music Conservatory of Paris. When his family moved to Powell River B.CAfter graduation Mando moved to Toronto and studied at Humber College with world famous teacher, Pat LaBarbera, who played with Buddy Rich, Woody Herman and the legendary Elvin Jones. In 1984 Armando won the highest award at the BC WOODWIND FINALS.
Mando recorded his first CD, THE BUBBLEHEADS, at the age of 20 and for the next six years was active in the Toronto music scene playing Jazz, Blues, and R&B and becoming proficient at alto, tenor, and soprano saxophone as well as flute and percussion.

In the 90′s Armando acted as the musical director and featured soloist at the famous CLUB NEW ORLEANS in Papeete, Tahiti, and had the opportunity to work with greats like Nathan East, Jimmie Earl, Freddie Ravel, and many more. His collaboration with jazz singer, Chris Bennett, took him to Berlin, Germany and live recordings and guest appearances at the A-TRANE, one of the world’s great jazz clubs. His soldout appearances in Berlin and Los Angeles hi-lite Mando’s unique and beautiful tone, sometimes compared to Stan Getz, as well as his incredible showmanship.

With homebase in his island paradise of Tahiti, Mando now occasionally tours the world with stars such as Otmaro Ruiz, Felix Vilchez,Chris Bennett and more. He has recorded with the legendary Leon Ware and has produced and written several of his own CDs including DANCE FOR PLANET EARTH, now available at CD Baby and I-Tunes. The title cut, AORI NO TE FENUA, is the theme song for the TAHITI MUSIC FESTIVAL. Produced by Armando Castagnoli and Chris Bennett, the 2012 festival will raise awareness of how we can save our oceans and islands such as Tahiti and will bring musicians from all over the world together in unity and celebration.
http://armandocastagnoli.com/bio/


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“Hugh Masekela – Grazing In The Grass”

“Hugh Masekela – Grazing In The Grass”

Grazing In The Grass is an African instrumental song, originally recorded by Hugh Masekala. The song can be attributed to the extraordinary, beautiful, vibrant landscapes throughout Africa where animals are known to comfortably graze. The song was introduced in the USA and became more popular through cultural influences, and added lyrics. ~AOC~
A vocal version of the song by The Friends of Distinction, with lyrics by band member Harry Elston, was a US chart hit in 1969. The song has been recorded by many other musicians.

The jazz scene in South Africa grew much as it did in the United States. Through performances in nightclubs, dances, and other venues, musicians had the opportunity to play music often. Musicians such as singer Sathima Bea Benjamin learned by going to nightclubs and jam sessions and waiting for opportunities to offer their talents. One unique aspect of the South African jazz scene was the appearance of individuals imitating popular artists as closely as possible because the real musician wasn’t there to perform in the area. For instance, one could find a “Cape Town Dizzy Gillespie” who would imitate not only the music, but the look and style of Dizzy. This practice created a strong environment to nurture some artists who would eventually leave South Africa and become legitimate contributors to the international jazz scene.

One of the first major bebop groups in South Africa in the 1950s was the Jazz Epistles. This group consisted of trombonist Jonas Gwangwa, trumpeter Hugh Masekela, saxophonist Kippie Moeketsi, and pianist Abdullah Ibrahim (then known as Dollar Brand). This group brought the sounds of United States bebop, created by artists such as Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, and Thelonious Monk, to Cape Town with Moeketsi modeling his sound and style on Parker’s. This group was the first in South Africa to cut a record in the bebop style, but their contemporaries, the Blue Notes, led by pianist Chris McGregor, were no less involved in the local jazz scene. Together, these two groups formed the backbone of South African bebop.

An early use of jazz as an anti-apartheid tool was the production of a musical entitled King Kong. Written as a social commentary on young black South Africans, much of the music was arranged and performed by famous South African jazz musicians, including all the members of the Jazz Epistles, minus bandleader Abdullah Ibrahim. The musical was premiered to an integrated audience at the University of Witwatersranddespite efforts of the government to prevent its opening. The university had legal jurisdiction over its property and was able to allow the gathering of an integrated audience. From this point on, as the play toured South Africa, it carried this undertone of defiance with it. The success of the play eventually took it to premiere in London, and while failing financially outside of South Africa, allowed many local jazz musicians an opportunity to obtain passports and leave the country.

In March 1960, the first in a series of small uprisings occurred, in an event that is now known as the Sharpeville Massacre. Censorship was dramatically increased by the apartheid government, which led to the shutting down of all venues and events that catered to or employed both black and white individuals. Gatherings of more than ten people were also declared illegal. As a result, a mass exodus was created of jazz musicians leaving South Africa seeking work. Among these were pianist Abdullah Ibrahim, his wife and jazz vocalist Sathima Bea Benjamin, trumpeter Hugh Masekela, and vocalist Miriam Makeba.

For some, the move proved to be fortuitous. Ibrahim and Benjamin found themselves in the company of US jazz great Duke Ellingtonin a night club in Paris in early 1963. The meet resulted in a recording of Ibrahim’s trio, Duke Ellington presents the Dollar Brand Trio, and a recording of Benjamin, accompanied by Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, Ibrahim, and Svend Asmussen, called A Morning in Paris. Artists such as Masekela traveled to the United States and were exposed first hand to the American jazz scene.

One of the most important subgenres of jazz in the region is Cape Jazz. The music originates from Cape Town and surrounding towns and is inspired by the carnival music of the area, sometimes referred to as Goema.

The end of apartheid has brought a revival of jazz music.

Hugh Masekela died at age 78.

Date of death: January 23, 2018

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on 04/10 in jazz, music

 

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Hooverphonics – “Mad About You..”

Hooverphonics – “Mad About You..”

The song features a sweeping string arrangement that typifies the trip hopgenre. It is also similar in style to a Bond-style film theme, with its dramatic orchestration and lyrics.

“Mad About You” was used in the soundtrack for the films Driven (2001),New Best Friend (2002), A Lot Like Love(2005) and Ma première fois [fr] (2012).

It was used in an episode of a TV show Cold Case (season 3, episode 5).

The song is also played in the Netflix show The Umbrella Academy (season 1, episode 8).

Cantonese pop singer Joey Yung covered the song in Cantonese on her 2002 album Something About You.

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Posted by on 04/10 in jazz, other

 

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“Montreux Jazz Festival | 2019

“Montreux Jazz Festival | 2019

THE UPCOMING, SPECTACULAR MONTREUX JAZZ FESTIVAL

28 June – 13 July 2019. Get Ready….

Montreux Jazz festival, one of the best jazz festivals in Europe. It has implemented other styles of music too.

53e Montreux Jazz Festival – Programme announcement…

More info on 2019 lineup: source

 

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“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

“Patti Labelle – Isn’t it a shame”

Chameleon is the sixth album by American singing trio Labelle. Though Patti LaBelle’s autobiography Don’t Block The Blessings revealed that LaBelle planned a follow-up to Chameleon entitled Shaman, the album never materialized. The trio would not release another new recording until 2008’s Back to Now. The final album was moderately successful peaking at #94 at the Pop charts and #21 on the R&B charts. Only two singles made the charts which were “Get You Somebody New” which peaked at #50 on the Pop charts and their memorable song “Isn’t It A Shame” which debuted at #18 on the R&B charts. “Isn’t It A Shame” was later sampled by Nelly on his 2004 hit, “My Place”, which featured Jaheim.

Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patricia Louise Holt-Edwards (born May 24, 1944),[1] better known under the stage name Patti LaBelle, is an American singer, author, actress, and entrepreneur. LaBelle began her career in the early 1960s as lead singer and front woman of the vocal group, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles. Following the group’s name change to Labelle in the early 1970s, she released the iconic disco song “Lady Marmalade” and the group later became the first African-American vocal group to land the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.[1] After the group split in 1976, LaBelle began a successful solo career, starting with her critically acclaimed debut album, which included the career-defining song, “You Are My Friend”. LaBelle became a mainstream solo star in 1984 following the success of the singles, “If Only You Knew”, “New Attitude” and “Stir It Up”, with the latter two crossing over to pop audiences becoming radio staples.[1]

Early life and career

Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles

Patti joined a local church choir at the Beulah Baptist Church at ten and performed her first solo two years later, while she also grew up listening to secular music styles such as R&B and jazz music. When she was fifteen, she won a talent competition at her high school. This success led to Patti forming her first singing group, the Ordettes, in 1960, with schoolmates Jean Brown, Yvonne Hogen and Johnnie Dawson.[7] The group, with Patti as front woman, became a local attraction until two of its members left to marry.[8] In 1962, the Ordettes included three new members, Cindy Birdsong, Sarah Dash and Nona Hendryx, the latter two girls having sung for another defunct vocal group.[8] That year, they auditioned for local record label owner Harold Robinson. Robinson agreed to work with the group after Patti began singing the song “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”. Initially Robinson was dismissive of Patti due to him feeling Patti was “too dark and too plain”.[8] Shortly after signing them, he had them record as the Blue Belles and they were selected to promote the recording of “I Sold My Heart to the Junkman”, which had been recorded by The Starlets, but was assigned as a Blue Belles single due to label conflict.[8] The Starlets’ manager sued Harold Robinson after the Blue Belles were seen performing a lip-synching version of the song on American Bandstand.[8] After settling out of court, Robinson altered the group’s name to “Patti LaBelle and The Blue Belles”.[8] Initially, a Billboard ad cited the group as “Patti Bell and the Blue Bells”.[9] In 1963, the group scored their first hit single with the ballad “Down the Aisle (The Wedding Song)” which became a crossover top 40 hit on the Billboard pop and R&B charts after King Records issued it. Later in the year, they recorded their rendition of the standard “You’ll Never Walk Alone”; the single was later re-released on Cameo-Parkway Records where the group scored a second hit on the pop charts with the song in 1964. Another charted single, “Danny Boy”, was released that same year. In 1965, after Cameo-Parkway folded, the group moved to New York and signed with Atlantic Records where they recorded twelve singles for the label, including the mildly charted singles “All or Nothing” and “Take Me for a Little While”. The group’s Atlantic tenure included their rendition of “Over the Rainbow” and a version of the song “Groovy Kind of Love”. In 1967, Birdsong left the group to join The Supremes and by 1970 the group had been dropped from Atlantic Records as well as by their longtime manager Bernard Montague. That year, Vicki Wickham, producer of the UK music show, Ready, Steady, Go, agreed to manage the group after Dusty Springfield mentioned signing them. Wickham’s first direction for the group was for them to change their name to simply Labelle and advised the group to renew their act, going for a more homegrown look and sound that reflected psychedelic soul. In 1971, the group opened for The Who in several stops on the group’s U.S. tour.

Labelle signed with the Warner Music imprint, Track Records, and released their self-titled debut album in 1971. The record’s psychedelic soul sound and its blending of rock and soul rhythms was a departure from the group’s early sound. That same year, they sang background vocals on Laura Nyro’s album, Gonna Take a Miracle. A year later, in 1972, the group released Moon Shadow, which repeated the homegrown gritty sound of the previous album. In 1973, influenced by glam rockers David Bowie and Elton John, Wickham had the group dressed in silver space suits and luminescent makeup.[10] After their third successive album, Pressure Cookin’, failed to generate a hit, Labelle signed with Epic Records in 1974, releasing their most successful album to date, with Nightbirds, which blended soul, funk and rock music, thanks to the work of the album’s producer, Allen Toussaint. The single, “Lady Marmalade”, would become their biggest-selling single, going number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling over a million copies, as did Nightbirds, which later earned a RIAA gold award, for sales of a million units. In October 1974, Labelle made pop history by becoming the first rock and roll vocal group to perform at the Metropolitan Opera House.[11] Riding high on the success of “Lady Marmalade” and the Nightbirds album, Labelle made the cover of Rolling Stone in 1975. Labelle released two more albums, Chameleon and Phoenix in 1975 and 1976 respectively. While both albums continued the group’s critical success, none of the singles issued on those albums ever crossed over to the pop charts.

Wikipedia.org

 

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“Dedication – Noora Noor” 

Noora Noor aka Noora (born 8 July 1979) is a Somalian-Norwegian neo soul singer.

Noor started early on her musical journey, performing locally from the age of 8. She got a recording contract with Warner Music at only 15. She then began working with Stargate (production team) to make her first album. The success of the album launched Stargate’s international career as R&B/Soul producers.

Noor’s debut album, Curious, was released in 1999 and became one of the first notable Scandinavian R&B albums. The single “Need You” was also played constantly on “The Lick” on MTV. Curious became a success also in Japan with more than 40,000 sales. It took five years until the release of her second album, All I Am, in 2004, as Noor became seriously ill. The album included more self-penned songs, written in collaboration with US and UK songwriters. She is also featured on Madcon’s 2007 album So Dark the Con of Man and some Tommy Tee releases. In addition, Noor played Maria Magdalen in a big outdoor version of Jesus Christ Superstar.

Her most recent album, Soul Deep, was released in Norway in March 2009 to rave reviews (6 on the dice in Norway’s major daily VG). Recorded in San Jose, California, with local blues and soul musicians, it also features members of Little Charlie & The Nightcats. The producer was Kid Andersen, the Norwegian band’s guitar virtuoso. The album was released outside Norway during 2010, with the first single, in Benelux, made available in April/May 2010.

In March 2011, Noor participated in the Norwegian national selection for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011, the Melodi Grand Prix, with the song “Gone with the wind”

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Posted by on 04/10 in blues, jazz

 

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