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“Dedication – Noora Noor” 



Noora Noor aka Noora (born 8 July 1979) is a Somalian-Norwegian neo soul singer.[1]

Noor started early on her musical journey, performing locally from the age of 8. She got a recording contract with Warner Music at only 15. She then began working with Stargate (production team) to make her first album. The success of the album launched Stargate’s international career as R&B/Soul producers.

Noor’s debut album, Curious, was released in 1999 and became one of the first notable Scandinavian R&B albums. The single “Need You” was also played constantly on “The Lick” on MTVCurious became a success also in Japan with more than 40,000 sales. It took five years until the release of her second album, All I Am, in 2004, as Noor became seriously ill. The album included more self-penned songs, written in collaboration with US and UK songwriters. She is also featured on Madcon‘s 2007 album So Dark the Con of Man and some Tommy Tee releases. In addition, Noor played Maria Magdalen in a big outdoor version of Jesus Christ Superstar.

Her most recent album, Soul Deep, was released in Norway in March 2009 to rave reviews (6 on the dice in Norway’s major daily VG). Recorded in San Jose, California, with local blues and soul musicians, it also features members of Little Charlie & The Nightcats. The producer was Kid Andersen, the Norwegian band’s guitar virtuoso. The album was released outside Norway during 2010, with the first single, in Benelux, made available in April/May 2010.

In March 2011, Noor participated in the Norwegian national selection for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011, the Melodi Grand Prix, with the song “Gone with the wind”

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on October 19, 2017 in jazz, blues

 

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Enjoy the music and work of “Jazz blues artist and painter Karen Hollowell” 

Enjoy the music and work of “Jazz blues artist and painter Karen Hollowell” 

Image: bluesbetty.com/jukejoint

“Music is my passion, and I am deeply motivated to shining a light on the power of blues and jazz— both which have influenced so many other styles of popular music.  My paintings strive to capture a moment within a tune: a wailing guitar solo, a haunting trumpet or a quiet moment after a big crescendo.”

Karen Hollowell graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. She spent a year in London, England studying with Edward Booth-Clibborn, Pentagram Design and various artists-in-residence.

Focusing on a commercial art career, Karen became an award-winning Designer and Art Director, working with a diverse range of clients including: Rhino Video, Educational Insights, Disney Publishing and The Smithsonian Institute. 

Karen’s works have been exhibited in both Canada and the U.S., including Vancouver, New Orleans and Memphis.

bluesbetty.com

 

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“Miles Davis – Nuit Sur Les Champs-Elysees (Night On The Champs-Elysees)” 

Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. He is among the most influential and acclaimed figures in the history of jazz and 20th century music. Davis adopted a variety of musical directions in his five-decade career which kept him at the forefront of a number of major stylistic developments in jazz.[1]

Born and raised in Illinois, Davis left his studies at The Juilliard School in New York City and made his professional debut as a member of saxophonist Charlie Parker’s bebop quintet from 1944 to 1948. Shortly after, he recorded the Birth of the Cool sessions for Capitol Records, which were instrumental to the development of cool jazz. In the early 1950s, Davis recorded some of the earliest hard bop music while on Prestige Records but did so haphazardly due to a heroin addiction. After a widely acclaimed comeback performance at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1955, he signed a long-term contract with Columbia Records and recorded the 1957 album ‘Round About Midnight.[2] It was his first work with saxophonist John Coltrane and bassist Paul Chambers, key members of the sextet he led into the early 1960s. During this period, he alternated between orchestral jazz collaborations with arranger Gil Evans, such as the Spanish music-influenced Sketches of Spain (1960), and band recordings, such as Milestones (1958) and Kind of Blue (1959).[3] The latter recording remains one of the most popular jazz albums of all time,[4] selling over 4 million copies in the US.

Davis made several line-up changes while recording Someday My Prince Will Come (1961), his 1961 Blackhawk concerts, and Seven Steps to Heaven (1963), another mainstream success that introduced bassist Ron Carter, pianist Herbie Hancock, and drummer Tony Williams.[3] After adding saxophonist Wayne Shorter to his new quintet in 1964,[3] Davis led them on a series of more abstract recordings often composed by the band members, helping pioneer the post-bop genre with albums such as E.S.P (1965) and Miles Smiles (1967),[5] before transitioning into his electric period. During the 1970s, he radically experimented with rock, funk, African rhythms, emerging electronic music technology, and an ever-changing line-up of musicians, including keyboardist Joe Zawinul, drummer Al Foster, and guitarist John McLaughlin.[6] This period, beginning with Davis’ 1969 studio album In a Silent Way and concluding with the 1975 concert recording Agharta, was the most controversial in his career, alienating and challenging many in jazz.[7] His million-selling 1970 record Bitches Brew helped spark a resurgence in the genre’s commercial popularity with jazz fusion as the decade progressed.[8]

After a five-year retirement due to poor health, Davis resumed his career in the 1980s, employing younger musicians and pop music sounds on albums such as The Man with the Horn (1981) and Tutu (1986). Critics were generally unreceptive but the decade garnered the trumpeter his highest level of commercial recognition. He performed sold-out concerts worldwide while branching out into visual arts, film, and television work, before his death in 1991 from the combined effects of a stroke, pneumonia and respiratory failure.[9] In 2006, Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,[10] which recognized him as “one of the key figures in the history of jazz”.[10] Rolling Stone described him as “the most revered jazz trumpeter of all time, not to mention one of the most important musicians of the 20th century,”[9] while Gerald Early called him inarguably one of the most influential and innovative musicians of that period.[11]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on September 8, 2017 in FRENCH FRIDAYS, jazz

 

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“Herbie Hancock Watermelon Man” 

Watermelon Man” is a jazz standard written by Herbie Hancock, first released on his debut album, Takin’ Off (1962).

First version was released as a grooving hard bop and featured improvisations by Freddie Hubbard and Dexter Gordon.[1] A single of the tune reached the Top 100 of the pop charts. Cuban percussionist Mongo Santamaría released the tune as a Latin pop single the next year on Battle Records, where it became a surprise hit, reaching #10 on the pop charts.[2]Santamaría’s recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998. Hancock radically re-worked the tune, combining elements of funk, for the album Head Hunters (1973).[1]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 30, 2017 in jazz

 

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Smooth Jazz [Najee – Brazilian Affair] | ♫ ♫

Smooth Jazz [Najee – Brazilian Affair] | ♫ ♫

Featured image: http://activerain.com/blogsview

Brazilian Jazz can refer to both a genre, largely influenced by Bossa Nova, that exists in many nations and the jazz music of Brazil itself.

Bossa Nova and Jazz 

Bossa’s relationship to jazz, and popularity with American jazz musicians, led to Brazilian musicians, such as Airto Moreira and Flora Purim, spending time in the United States and connecting to its jazz scene. Egberto Gismonti and Hermeto Pascoal also had a close association to jazz. This, combined with earlier collaborations between America jazz musicians and bossa nova]artists, also led to “Brazilian jazz” as a kind of genre American musicians, notably Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd played.  

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 30, 2017 in jazz, latin music, music

 

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Tito Puente – Ran Kan Kan

Tito Puente – Ran Kan Kan

This song is by Tito Puente and appears on the album Babarabatiri (1951) and on the movie soundtrack The Mambo Kings (1991).

http://www.lyrics.wikia.com

About the Artist

Ernesto Antonio “Tito” Puente (April 20, 1923 – May 31, 2000)[1] was an American musician, songwriter and record producer. The son of Ernest and Ercilia Puente, native Puerto Ricans living in New York City’s Spanish Harlem, Puente is often credited as “The Musical Pope”, “El Rey de los Timbales” (The King of the Timbales) and “The King of Latin Music”. He is best known for dance-oriented mambo and Latin jazz compositions that endured over a 50-year career. He and his music appear in many films such as The Mambo Kings and Fernando Trueba’s Calle 54. He guest-starred on several television shows, including Sesame Street and The Simpsons two-part episode “Who Shot Mr. Burns?”.

Song Origination

The soundtrack to The Mambo Kings is a solid effort that effectively conveys the atmosphere inherent in the film, which was based on Oscar Hijuelos’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. Assembled here is a selection of mambos, rumbas, boleros and cha cha chas performed by stellar artists of the Latin scene including Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Benny Moré, Johnny Pacheco and Arturo Sandoval mixed with well-known performers with roots in the form like Linda Ronstadt and Los Lobos. Besides this, the Mambo All-Stars are a high energy dance band composed of top studio sidemen from New York City and Los Angeles. With only a couple of exceptions, the tracks were cut specially for the film and as such, add a novel, accurately reflecting the Cuban music sound of the 1950s. The 2000 Elektra updated edition adds a remix of Tito Puente’s “Ran Kan Kan” by Olga Tañón and a rendition of “Beautiful Maria of My Soul” featuring Antonio Banderas and legendary crooner Compay Segundo of Buena Vista Social Club fame.

wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 28, 2017 in classic music, jazz, latin music

 

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Ray Charles – Georgia On My Mind

Ray Charles – Georgia On My Mind

Featured image:planetearthrec.com/

“Georgia on My Mind” is a 1930 song written by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell and first recorded that year. It has often been associated with Ray Charles, a native of Georgia who recorded it for his 1960 album The Genius Hits the Road. In 1979 Georgia designated this as the official state song.

Wikipedia.org

Five different versions of this song have made the US Hot 100. Here the four that came after Charles’ recording: Righteous Brothers (#62, 1966) Georgia Pines Candymen (#81, 1967) Wes Montgomery (#91, 1968) Willie Nelson (#84, 1978) Michael Bolton (#36, 1990).

On April 24, 1979, this became the official state song of Georgia, replacing a song title “Georgia.” Ray Charles performed the song the ceremony that day, where it was decreed: The song “Georgia on My Mind,” with lyrics by Mr. Stuart Gorrell and music by Mr. Hoagy Carmichael, has an enduring quality that has made it one of the best loved songs in America for many years. Although “Georgia on My Mind” describes a Georgian’s love for his state, its beautiful melody and lyrics have given the song a worldwide appeal. “Georgia on My Mind” has been recorded by many outstanding artists, but the rendition by Mr. Ray Charles, a native Georgian, which was first recorded in 1958, has been greatly enjoyed by music lovers throughout the world. It is appropriate that the official State song should be a beautiful song that has wide appeal throughout the country, and “Georgia on My Mind” is an outstanding example of these qualities.

songfacts.com

 
 

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