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Category Archives: Italiano (I Tell Ya I Know)

“Copacabana (At the Copa)” 

“Copacabana (At the Copa)” 

The song was inspired by a conversation between Manilow and Sussman at the Copacabana Hotel in Rio de Janeiro, when they discussed whether there had ever been a song called “Copacabana”. After returning to the US, Manilow — who, in the 1960s, had been a regular visitor to the Copacabana nightclub in New York City — suggested that Sussman and Feldman write the lyrics to a story song for him. They did so, and Manilow supplied the music.[1]


https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=-2EoReHa-p8

https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=LQpCaxX0mtI

 

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“The Ultimate Dining Experience: A Rock And A Hard Place”  

“The Ultimate Dining Experience: A Rock And A Hard Place”  

Yes, it is a cave…   a hollow place in the ground.   Specifically,  a natural underground space large enough for a human to enter. Caves form naturally by the weathering of rock and often extend deep underground. The word cave can also refer to much smaller openings such as sea cavesrock shelters, and grottos.

It is estimated that the maximum depth of a cave cannot be more than 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) due to the pressure of overlying rocks. For karst caves the maximum depth is determined on the basis of the lower limit of karst forming processes, coinciding with the base of the soluble carbonate rocks.

Most caves are formed in limestone by dissolution.

But check this cave out:

Stunning views over the Adriatic, a warm summer night’s breeze and world class dining – the only thing the Grotta Palazzese is missing is four walls.

This enchanting restaurant in Polignano a Mare in Southern Italy was built inside a cave centuries ago, allowing for one of the world’s most unique dining experiences.
Carved from the cliff face’s limestone, the restaurant juts out 74 feet above sea level, allowing diners to watch the waves lap the shores just beneath them.

Yes, ‘Breathtaking’: A Restaurant Grotto, situated in a limestone cave in Southern Italy

And, it is also ‘Stunning’: It is just 74 ft above sea level, allowing diners to watch the waves lap the shores below

The dramatic view over the sea is best viewed from one of the dimly-lit tables for two that sweep along the cave’s edge.

MENU

As they take in the sea view, they can enjoy dishes such as Thai squid and grilled garlic prawns with glasses of Fiano di Avellino(and so much more) – at more than $100 a head.   Right here:



World class: Dishes include Thai squid and grilled garlic prawns, and meals can cost $100 a head
Grotta
Grotta
Grotta
Grotta
Atmospheric: The dimly-lit tables for two along the water's edge offer the most romantic seats in the house
Atmospheric: The dimly-lit tables for two along the water’s edge offer the most romantic seats in the house

And if diners want to work up an appetite before the meal, they can meander through the narrow streets of the medieval town, built on sheer cliffs with scattered white buildings and natural caves.

The setting also provided a feast for the eyes for local nobility during grand banquets at the restaurant as far back as the 1700s.

The grotta – Italian for ‘cave’ – is part of the Grotta Palazzese hotel, which is located above and built from local stone. The restaurant is open from May to October.

Cave: The restaurant, which is only open in the summer months, is situated beneath a hotel
Cave: The restaurant, which is only open in the summer months, is situated beneath a hotel
Quiet: The restaurant, near Bari in Southern Italy, offers spacious tables and an ever-changing menu
Quiet: The restaurant, near Bari in Southern Italy, offers spacious tables and an ever-changing menu
Tranquil: Diners can enjoy dinner while overlooking the still Adriatic sea
Tranquil: Diners enjoy dinner while overlooking the still, Adriatic sea
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2183516/Grotta-Palazzese-Stunning-restaurant-built-inside-cave-Italian-coast.html
 

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Amaretto Iced Coffee

Despite the known history on the introduction and acceptance of almonds into Italian cuisine, newer takes on the meanings and origins have been popularized by the two major brands. Though of sometimes questionable factuality, these tales hold a sentimental place in Saronno culture:

In 1525, a Saronno church commissioned artist Bernardino Luini, one of Leonardo da Vinci‘s pupils, to paint their sanctuary with frescoes. As the church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, Luini needed to depict the Madonna, but was in need of a model. He found his inspiration in a young widowed innkeeper, who became his model and (in most versions) lover. Out of gratitude and affection, the woman wished to give him a gift. Her simple means did not permit much, so she steeped apricot kernels in brandy and presented the resulting concoction to a touched Luini.

Amaretto (Italian for “a little bitter”) is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur associated with SaronnoItaly. Various commercial brands are made from a base of apricot pits, almonds, or both.[1]

Amaretto serves a variety of culinary uses, can be drunk by itself, and is added to other beverages to create several popular mixed drinks, as well as to coffee.

en.m.wikipedia.org

INGREDIENTS

 
 

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“Cafetière italienne Mukka Express Bialetti” 

 

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 “Capuchino Frappé – DaVinci Gourmet” 

Capuchino Frappé DaVinci Gourmet:

 

 
 

DELICIOUS, TOASTED ALMOND BISCOTTI and ESPRESSO

DELICIOUS, TOASTED ALMOND BISCOTTI and ESPRESSO

​Crunchy, crumbly twice-baked cookies studded with almonds are the perfect complement to a cup of coffee or glass of vin santo.

These traditional Italian cookies, brimming with toasted almonds, are twice-baked for extra crispiness. This recipe first appeared in our December 2013 issue along with Mike Colameco’s article All is Calm, All is Bright.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Toasted-Almond-Biscotti

220px-tazzina_di_caffè_a_ventimiglia.jpg.jpeg
en.m.wikipedia.org

Espresso (/ɛˈsprɛsoʊ/, Italian: [esˈprɛsso]) is coffee brewed by forcing a small amount of nearly boiling water under pressure through finely ground coffee beans. Espresso is generally thicker than coffee brewed by other methods, has a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids, and has crema on top (a foam with a creamy consistency).[1] As a result of the pressurized brewing process, the flavors and chemicals in a typical cup of espresso are very concentrated. Espresso is also the base for other drinks such as a caffè latte, cappuccino, caffè macchiato, caffè mocha, flat white, or caffè Americano. Espresso has more caffeine per unit volume than most coffee beverages, but because the usual serving size is much smaller, the total caffeine content is less than a mug of standard brewed coffee, contrary to a common belief.[2] Although the actual caffeine content of any coffee drink varies by size, bean origin, roast method and other factors, the caffeine content of “typical” servings of espresso vs. drip brew are 120 to 170 mg[3] vs. 150 to 200 mg.[4][5]
There is debate over whether the spelling expresso is incorrect or whether it is an acceptable variant. Oxford Dictionaries online states “The spelling “expresso” is not used in the original Italian and is strictly incorrect, although it is common.”[6] The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style (2000) describes the spelling expresso as “wrong”, and specifies espresso as the only correct form.[7] The third edition of Fowler’s Modern English Usage (1996) states that espresso “has entirely driven out the variant expresso”.[8] The Oxford English Dictionary, Merriam-Webster and the Online Etymology Dictionary call “expresso” a variant spelling.[9][10][11]

Espresso is made by forcing very hot water under high pressure through finely ground, compacted coffee. Tamping down the coffee promotes the water’s even penetration of the grounds.[12] This process produces an almost syrupy beverage by extracting both solid and dissolved components. The crema [13][14] is produced by emulsifying the oils in the ground coffee into a colloid, which does not occur in other brewing methods. There is no universal standard defining the process of extracting espresso,[15] but there are several published definitions which attempt to place constraints on the amount and type of ground coffee used, the temperature and pressure of the water, and the rate of extraction.[16][17] Generally, one uses an espresso machine to make espresso. The act of producing a shot of espresso is often termed “pulling” a shot, originating from lever espresso machines, which require pulling down a handle attached to a spring-loaded piston, forcing hot water through the coffee at high pressure. Today, however, it is more common for the pressure to be generated by an electric pump.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

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 “Tony Bennett o Sole Mio” 

Anthony Dominick Benedetto (born August 3, 1926),[1] known professionally as Tony Bennett, is an American singer of traditional pop standards, big band, show tunes, and jazz. He is also a painter, having created works under the name Anthony Benedetto that are on permanent public display in several institutions. He is the founder of the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Astoria, Queens, New York.[3]

Born and raised in Astoria to an Italian-American family, Bennett began singing at an early age. He fought in the final stages of World War II as a U.S. Army infantryman in the European Theater. Afterward, he developed his singing technique, signed with Columbia Records and had his first number-one popular song with “Because of You” in 1951. Several top hits such as “Rags to Riches” followed in the early 1950s. He then refined his approach to encompass jazz singing. He reached an artistic peak in the late 1950s with albums such as The Beat of My Heart and Basie Swings, Bennett Sings. 

In 1962, Bennett recorded his signature song, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”. His career and his personal life experienced an extended downturn during the height of the rock music era.

Bennett staged a comeback in the late 1980s and 1990s, putting out gold record albums again and expanding his reach to the MTV Generation while keeping his musical style intact. He has won 19 Grammy Awards (including a Lifetime Achievement Award, presented in 2001) and two Emmy Awards, and was named an NEA Jazz Master and a Kennedy Center Honoree. He has sold over 50 million records worldwide.

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“‘O sole mio” is a famous Naples song written in 1898. The lyrics were written by Giovanni Capurro and the music was composed by Eduardo di Capua.

It has been performed and covered by many artists as Enrico Caruso, Beniamino Gigli, Mario Lanza and The Three Tenors. It has also been performed by rock/pop artists such as Dalida, Anna Oxa, Bryan Adams, Me First, Vitas Al Bano, Elvis Presley (“It’s Now or Never”). Luciano Pavarotti won the 1980 Grammy Award for Best Classical Vocal Performance for his rendition of “‘O Sole Mio.”

en.m.wikipedia.org

English translation: MY SUN

What a beautiful thing, it’s a sunny day

The gentle breeze after the storm

The air’s so fresh, it feels like a 

celebration

What a beautiful thing, it’s a sunny day

But another sun,

That’s even brighter

It’s my own sun

That’s upon your face!
When night comes and the sun sets 

down

I almost start to feel blue

I’d stay below your window

When night comes and the sun sets 

down

But another sun,

That’s even brighter

It’s my own sun

That’s upon your face!

The sun, my own sun

It’s upon your face

It’s upon your face

 But another sun,

That’s even brighter

It’s my own sun

That’s upon your face!
http://lyricstranslate.com/en/039o-sole-mio-my-sun.html


 

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