Category Archives: FRENCH FRIDAYS



1 package (1/4 ounce) active dry yeast

2/3 cup warm water (110° to 115°)

1/2 cup butter, softened

3/4 cup sugar

4 egg yolks

1/3 cup evaporated milk

1/2 teaspoon salt

3-3/4 to 4-1/4 cups all-purpose flour


3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips

1/3 cup evaporated milk

2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon


1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 cup cold butter, cubed

1/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips

1/4 cup chopped walnuts

Confectioners’ sugar, optional


  1. In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Add the butter, sugar, egg yolks, milk and salt; mix well. Add 2 cups flour; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
  2. For filling, combine the chocolate chips, milk and sugar in a saucepan; cook and stir over low heat until smooth. Stir in cinnamon; set aside. For topping, combine the flour, sugar and cinnamon in a bowl; cut in butter until crumbly. Stir in chocolate chips and nuts. Set aside.
  3. Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; roll into an 18-in. x 10-in. rectangle. Spread with filling. Roll up jelly-roll style, starting with a long side; pinch seam to seal. Place in a well-greased 10-in. fluted tube pan, with seam facing inside of pan. Sprinkle with topping. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  4. Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes or until golden brown. Let stand for 10 minutes before inverting onto a wire rack to cool. Sprinkle with confectioners; sugar if desired. Yield: 12-16 servings.




“Omelette” Does your pet do breakfast?

 “Omelette” is an  animated film short about the attention-getting resolve between a pet and its owner.


Posted by on March 17, 2018 in entertainment, FRENCH FRIDAYS



Breakfast/Brunch/Dinner at Haunted New Orleans’ Myrtle Plantation… Would you, really?

The Myrtles Plantation is a historic home and former antebellum plantation in St. Francisville, Louisiana, United States. Built in 1796 by General David Bradford, it is touted as “one of America’s most haunted homes.”
The plantation house is rumored to be on top of an ancient Tunica Indian burial ground. It is currently a bed and breakfast, and offers historical and mystery tours. Touted as “one of America’s most haunted homes”, the plantation is supposedly the home of at least 12 ghosts.[12] It is often reported that 10 murders occurred in the house,[12] but historical records only indicate the murder of William Winter.[6]William Drew Winter is also a very popular character in the plantation. He was an attorney who lived in the plantation from 1865 until 1871. He was shot by a stranger. After being shot, he staggered inside the house and died trying to climb the stairs. He died on the 17th step of the stairs. Until today, visitors, as well as employees in the hotel, still hear his dying footsteps.[13]

In 2002, Unsolved Mysteries filmed a segment about the alleged hauntings at the plantation. According to host Robert Stack, the production crew experienced technical difficulties during the production of the segment. The Myrtles was also featured on a 2005 episode of Ghost Hunters.[14][15] The TV series Ghost Adventures also filmed an episode there.


The current plantation landscape is centered on a large pond that features a small island centered with a gazebo accessed by a bridge. To the rear of the main house is the oldest structure on the grounds. Now known as the General’s Store, this was where General Bradford lived while the main house was being built. Currently it is used as the gift shop, laundry facilities, plantation offices and guest breakfast spot.[4] To the south is another structure that houses a restaurant. The two ancillary buildings are connected to the main house by a 5,000 square feet (460 m2) old brick courtyard. Scattered elsewhere on the grounds are modern wooden cottages available to guests.

Would you venture an overnight at this frightful haunted plantation, for a delightful Cajun breakfast or delicious Sunday brunch? Maybe you can be taken simply for a slice of the plantation’s yummy cheesecake.





What is the origin of the omelet?
Omelettes were known to the Romans, if not the ancient Greeks. As for the word…

omelet (n.) 1610s, from French omelette(16c.), metathesis of alemette (14c.), from alemele “omelet,” literally “blade (of a knife or sword),” probably a misdivision of la lemelle (mistaken as l’alemelle), from Latin lamella “thin, small plate,” diminutive of lamina “plate, layer” (see laminate). The food so called from its flat shape. The proverb “you can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs” (1859) translates French On ne saurait faire une omelette sans casser des oeufs. Middle English had hanonei “fried onions mixed with scrambled eggs” (mid-15c.).



Posted by on March 2, 2018 in breakfast, FRENCH FRIDAYS



“MA SEULE AMOUR de RAI/My only love of RAI”

“MA SEULE AMOUR de RAI/My only love of RAI”

Laurent Voulzy – Ma Seule Amour

Je n’ai plus rien, à me réconforter,
Qu’un souvenir pour retenir liesse,
Ma seule amour, ma seule amour.

Stay away from the door, it’s locked forever,
Write a song, no other way to reach your lover x2

Ma seule amour, ma joie et ma Maîtresse,
Puisqu’il me faut loin de vous demeurer,
Je n’ai plus rien, à me réconforter,
Qu’un souvenir pour retenir liesse.

Ma seule amour, ma seule amour.

En allégeant par Espoir ma détresse,
Me conviendra le temps ainsi passer,
Ma seule amour, ma joie et ma Maîtresse,
Puisqu’il me faut loin de vous demeurer.

Stay away from the door, it’s locked forever,
Write a song, no other way to reach your lover x2

Car mon las coeur, bien garni de tristesse,
S’en est voulu avec vous aller,
Et ne pourrai jamais le recouvrer
Jusqu’ou verrai votre belle jeunesse.

Ma seule amour, ma seule amour.

Stay away from the door, it’s locked forever,
Write a song, no other way to reach your lover x2

Stay away, stay away.

Ma seule amour, ma seule amour.

(Merci à Eric Kamara pour cettes paroles)

Laurent Voulzy (born Lucien Voulzy on 18 December 1948) is a French singer and composer.

Voulzy was born in Paris, France. He originally led the English-pop-influenced Le Temple de Vénusbefore joining Pascal Danel as guitarist from 1969 to 1974. However, he is best known for his collaborative songwriting efforts with singer/songwriter Alain Souchon and his solo singing career, which spanned several successful albums.

Voulzy had an international hit with the song Rockollection. The French lyrics were interspersed with some lines from classic rock hits after the chorus. His major French hits also include ‘Le Soleil Donne’ – sung in French, English and Spanish – and ‘Les Nuits Sans Kim Wilde’ (‘Nights without Kim Wilde’), inspired by the chart-topping English singer.

In 2005, Voulzy co-produced and co-composed Nolwenn Leroy‘s second album Histoires Naturelles.

Voulzy had a huge hit with his album La Septième Vague which reached number one in 2006. Featured on the album is a cover of the Everly Brothers hit “All I Have to Do Is Dream“, recorded as a duet with Irish singer Andrea Corr. The song was released as a single and was also included on The Corrs‘ greatest hits album Dreams: The Ultimate Corrs Collection.

Voulzy recorded in 2007 a duet with the French guitarist Jean-Pierre Danel on his hit album Guitar Connection 2. The song hit the French charts at No. 7 in 2008. For his 2011 album, Lys and Love, Voulzy recorded a duet on the song “Ma seule amour” with English singer Roger Daltrey of The Who.[1] In 2007, Voulzy toured France.


Posted by on March 2, 2018 in FRENCH FRIDAYS, music



 “Charles Aznavour – J´ai bu” 

 “Charles Aznavour – J´ai bu” 

Charles Aznavour (/æznəvʊər/; French: [ʃaʁl aznavuʁ]; born Shahnour Vaghinag Aznavourian, Armenian: Շահնուր Վաղինակ Ազնավուրեան; 22 May 1924)[1][A] is a French, later naturalised Armenian,[4]singer, songwriter, actor, public activist and diplomat. Aznavour is known for his unique tenor[5] voice: clear and ringing in its upper reaches, with gravelly and profound low notes. In a career spanning over 80 years, he has written more than 800 songs. On disc, he recorded more than 1,200 songs, sung in eight languages.[6] He is one of France’s most popular and enduring singers.[7][8] He has sold 200 million records[9][10][11][12] and has been dubbed France’s Frank Sinatra,[13][14] while music critic Stephen Holden has described Aznavour as “French pop deity.”[15] He is also arguably the most famous Armenian of his time.[7][16] In 1998, Aznavour was named Entertainer of the Century by CNN and users of Time Online from around the globe. He was recognized as the century’s outstanding performer, with nearly 18% of the total vote, edging out Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan.

Aznavour has sung for presidents, popes and royalty, as well as at humanitarian events. In response to the 1988 Armenian earthquake, he founded the charitable organization Aznavour for Armenia along with his long-time friend impresario Levon Sayan. In 2009, he was appointed ambassador of Armenia to Switzerland, as well as Armenia’s permanent delegate to the United Nations at Geneva.[18]He started his most recent tour in 2014.

On 24 August 2017, Aznavour was awarded the 2,618th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.



“Acker Bilk – She” 

“Acker Bilk – She” 

Stanley Acker Bilk, MBE (28 January 1929 – 2 November 2014) was an English clarinettist and vocalist known for his appearance – goatee, bowler hat and striped waistcoat – and breathy, vibrato-rich, lower-register clarinet style.

Bilk played with friends on the Bristol jazz circuit and in 1951 moved to London to play with Ken Colyer‘s band.[3] Bilk disliked London, so returned west and formed his own band in Pensford called the Chew Valley Jazzmen, which was renamed the Bristol Paramount Jazz Band when they moved to London in 1951. Their agent then booked them for a six-month gig in Düsseldorf, Germany, playing in a beer bar seven hours a night, seven nights a week.[4] During this time, Bilk and the band developed their distinctive style and appearance, complete with striped-waistcoats and bowler hats.[4]

After returning from Germany, Bilk became based in Plaistow, London, and his band played in London jazz clubs.[3] It was from here that Bilk became part of the boom in Trad jazz in the United Kingdom in the late 1950s. In 1960, their single “Summer Set” (a pun on their home county), co-written by Bilk and pianist Dave Collett, reached number five on the UK Singles Chart,[6] and began a run of 11 chart hit singles. In 1961 “Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band” appeared at the Royal Variety Performance.[7]

Bilk was not an internationally known musician until 1962, when the experimental use of a string ensemble on one of his albums and the inclusion of a composition of his own as its keynote piece won him an audience outside the UK. He had composed a melody, entitled “Jenny” after his daughter, but was asked to change the title to “Stranger on the Shore” for use in a British television series. He went on to record it as the title track of a new album in which his deep and quavering clarinet was backed by the Leon Young String Chorale.

The single was not only a big hit in the United Kingdom, where it stayed on the charts for 55 weeks, helped by Bilk being the subject of the TV show This Is Your Life, but also topped the American charts.[2] As a result, Bilk was the second British artist to have a single in the number-one position on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.[8] (Vera Lynn was the first, with “Auf Wiederseh’n Sweetheart” in 1952.) “Stranger on the Shore” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[9] At the height of his career, Bilk’s public relations workers were known as the “Bilk Marketing Board”, a pun on the Milk Marketing Board.

Bilk recorded a series of albums in Britain that were also released successfully in the United States (on the Atlantic Records subsidiary Atco), including a collaboration, Together, with the Danish jazz pianist and composer Bent Fabric (“The Alley Cat”). Bilk’s success tapered off when British rock and roll made its big international impact beginning in 1964 and he shifted direction to the cabaret circuit. He finally had another chart success in 1976 with “Aria”, which went to number five in the United Kingdom. In May 1977 Bilk and his Paramount Jazz Band provided the interval act for the Eurovision Song Contest.[10] His last chart appearance was in 1978, when the TV-promoted album released on Pye/Warwick, Evergreen, reached 17 in a 14-week album chart run. In the early 1980s, Bilk and his signature hit were newly familiar, due to “Stranger on the Shore” being used in the soundtrack to Sweet Dreams, the film biography of country music singer Patsy Cline. “Aria” featured as a central musical motif in the 2012 Polish film Mój rower (pl).

Bilk continued to tour with his Paramount Jazz Band, as well as performing concerts with his two contemporaries, Chris Barber and Kenny Ball, both of whom were born in 1930, as “The 3Bs”. Bilk also provided vocals on many of his tracks, including on “I’m an Old Cowhand”, “The Folks Who Live on the Hill”, “White Cliffs of Dover”, “Travellin On” and “That’s My Home”.

In 2005 he was awarded the BBC Jazz Awards‘ “Gold Award”.

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Posted by on March 2, 2018 in classic music, FRENCH FRIDAYS



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