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Category Archives: folk music

“Bob Dylan- Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door “Original”

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“Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” is a song written and sung by Bob Dylan, for the soundtrack of the 1973 film Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. Released as a single, it reached #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. Described by Dylan biographer Clinton Heylin as “an exercise in splendid simplicity,”[1] the song, measured simply in terms of the number of other artists who have covered it, is one of Dylan’s most popular post-1960s compositions.

Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.[2]

Storyline and song structure

The song describes the collapse of a deputy sheriff; dying from a bullet wound, he tells his wife “Mama, take this badge off of me; I can’t use it anymore.” The song consists of four chords in the key of G major: G, D, Am7, and C. The basic pattern throughout the song is G-D-Am7-Am7 and then G-D-C-C, and this is repeated. Over the years, Dylan has changed the lyrics, as have others who have performed this song.

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“Blowin in The Wind – Bob Dylan”

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“Willie Nelson – Always On My Mind”

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Always on My Mind is a 1982 album by country singer Willie Nelson. It was the Billboard number one country album of the year for 1982, and stayed 253 weeks on the Billboard Top Country Albums charts, peaking at number one for a total of 22 weeks, as well as spending 99 weeks on the Billboard 200 for all albums, peaking at number two for 3 weeks.

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“Brook Benton – Rainy Night in Georgia” 

“Brook Benton – Rainy Night in Georgia” 

“Rainy Night in Georgia” is a song written by Tony Joe White in 1962 and popularized by R&B vocalist Brook Benton  in 1970.

In a January 17, 2014 interview with music journalist Ray Shasho, Tony Joe White explained the thought process behind the making of ”

Rainy Night in Georgia ” and “Polk Salad Annie”.

When I got out of high school I went to Marietta, Georgia, I had a sister living there. I went down there to get a job and I was playing guitar too at the house and stuff. I drove a dump truck for the highway department and when it would rain you didn’t have to go to work. You could stay home and play your guitar and hangout all night. So those thoughts came back to me when I moved on to Texas about three months later. I heard “Ode to Billie Joe” on the radio and I thought, man, how real, because I am Billie Joe, I know that life. I’ve been in the cotton fields. So I thought if I ever tried to write, I’m going to write about something I know about. At that time I was doing a lot of Elvis and John Lee Hooker onstage with my drummer. No original songs and I hadn’t really thought about it. But after I heard Bobbie Gentry I sat down and thought … well I know about Polk because I had ate a bunch of it and I knew about rainy nights because I spent a lot of rainy nights in Marietta, Georgia. So I was real lucky with my first tries to write something that was not only real and hit pretty close to the bone, but lasted that long. So it was kind of a guide for me then on through life to always try to write what I know about.

In 1969, after several years without a major hit, Benton had signed to a new record label, Cotillion Records (a subsidiary of Atlantic Records). Brought to the attention of producer Jerry Wexler, Benton recorded the song in November 1969 with producer Arif Mardin session personnel present on the hit record included Billy Carter on Organ, Dave Crawford on piano, Cornell Dupree and Jimmy O’Rourke on guitar, Harold Cowart on bass, Tubby Ziegler on drums, and Toots Thielmans on harmonica.

Taken from his “come-back” album

Brook Benton

Today, the melancholy song became an instant hit. In the spring of 1970, the song had topped the Billboard Best Selling Soul Singles chart. It also reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100,[1] and number two on the Adult Contemporary chart. In Canada, the song made #2 on the RPM Magazine Hot Singles chart.

The RIAA certified the single gold for sales of one million copies. In 2004, it was ranked #498 on the List of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

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Jewel – Foolish Games

Jewel – Foolish Games

Foolish Games” is a song by American recording artist Jewel from her debut studio album Pieces of You (1995). It was also the third single to be lifted from the Batman & Robin motion picture soundtrack. Jewel re-recorded the single for the soundtrack to produce a more radio-friendly version, similar to her other singles “Who Will Save Your Soul” and “You Were Meant for Me“. This version is shorter than the album version by one verse. The song details the frustration and agony of knowing that the intensity of one’s love is not reciprocated by one’s lover. The melodic line and chord progression of the verses in “Foolish Games” carry echoes of “Diamonds & Rust“, recorded by Joan Baez.

ish Games” was able to continue the chart life of “You Were Meant for Me”. The latter, which was on its 41st week on the chart at number 25, rebounded to number 12 as “Foolish Games”, eventually peaking at number 7 eight weeks later. Despite this, Billboard counted the two singles as one, and such, “Foolish Games” was also listed for peaking at number two, despite the song never actually peaking at that position, thanks to the peak of the second single.[1] “Foolish Games/You Were Meant for Me” was listed as the second best-performing song of 1997 by Billboard, behind Elton John‘s “Candle in the Wind 1997“.

“Foolish Games”/”You Were Meant for Me” ranked at number 15 on Billboard’s All Time Top 100[2] and held the record in the Guinness Book of World Records for longest chart run of a single for “Foolish Games”/”You Were Meant for Me”, which charted for 65 weeks. This record was later surpassed by “How Do I Live” by LeAnn Rimes, also in 1997 and 1998 with 69 weeks, and “I’m Yours” by Jason Mraz in 2008 and 2009 with 76 weeks, and then “Sail” by Awolnation at 79 weeks and “Radioactive” by Imagine Dragons at 87 weeks in 2013 and 2014. Jewel was also nominated for Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for this song.

The song is featured on Jewel’s Greatest Hits as a duet with Kelly Clarkson.

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Posted by on November 21, 2017 in female vocalist, folk music

 

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“America- Tin Man (w/ lyrics)”

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Tin Man” is a 1974 song by the pop rock band America. It was written by band member Dewey Bunnell and produced by George Martin, who also plays the piano part on the recorded version. The song was included on the band’s album Holiday, also from 1974.

Background

The song’s title and some of its lyrics refer to the Tin Woodman from The Wizard of Oz.[3] Songwriter Bunnell was quoted describing the parallel: “My favorite movie, I guess. I always loved it as a kid. Very obscure lyrics. Great grammar – ‘Oz never did give nothing to the Tin Man.’ It’s sort of a poetic license.”[3]

Dan Peek – who describes “Tin Man” as “quintessential Dewey, easy stream of consciousness with a major seventh acoustic bed” – states that Bunnell “actually begged us not to record the song. Knowing Dewey it was probably reverse psychology; if it was, Gerry and I fell for it, insisting it was perfect for the album.”[4]

Released as the first single from Holiday, “Tin Man” became the band’s fourth top-ten hit in the US, spending three weeks at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1974.[5] The song reached number one on the Billboard easy listening chart in October of that year.[3] In the UK, the song was relegated to the B-side of another album track, “Mad Dog”, released in July, but both sides failed to chart.

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Maria MULDAUR – (bluegrass) Don’t You Feel My Leg

Maria MULDAUR – (bluegrass) Don’t You Feel My Leg

From her early 1960s jug band recordings to the present day, Maria Muldaur stands unique in her ability to transcend categorization. For over forty years, Muldaur has shared her deep love of roots music. By carefully selecting her repertoire from the best North American songwriters, she has encompassed the blues of the Mississippi Delta, New Orleans gospel and jazz, Western Swing, Appalachian bluegrass/country and everything in between. Best known for her 1973 hit, “Midnight At The Oasis,” Muldaur has always been much more than a sexy one-hit wonder. Blessed with a voice that remains convincing regardless of the genre she chooses to tackle, her performances are a study in American musicology.

This performance, recorded at the legendary Trobadour in Los Angeles, followed the release of Maria Muldaur’s second solo album, Waitress In A Donut Shop. Unlike the majority of her live performances from this classic era, it captures one of the handful of concerts where she was not backed by her usual band of hippie renegades. Instead, this rare performance features Muldaur accompanied by seasoned jazz musicians, who provide an infectious big band feel that swings in all the right places.

None other than the legendary Benny Carter directed Muldaur’s band on this run. Admired as virtually any jazz musician ever, Carter was a contemporary of Duke Ellington (who he played with early in his career) and Count Basie and was universally respected for his abilities as a composer, musician and bandleader. Muldaur’s ensemble on this night featured the likes of Harry “Sweets” Edison and Snooky Young on trumpets and trombonist extraordinaire, J. J. Johnson. This set also captures Muldaur at her commercial peak, performing genre-breaking music with a stellar big band before a very appreciative audience.

Right from the start, Muldaur sets a swinging mood, opening with her take on Fats Waller’s “Squeeze Me,” followed by Jimmy Rogers’ classic “Any Old Time,” a song she recorded on her self-titled first album. The bluesy “Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You,” follows. Here Muldaur finds the perfect balance between sweet and sexy, with the musicians providing the perfect backdrop. Up next is “Sweetheart,” the song that contained the lyric that provided the title of her album, Waitress In A Donut Shop. This was one of two songs that Benny Carter and his band actually recorded on that album. Hearing a live rendition, featuring virtually the same musicians as the studio session, is quite the treat. Following this, Muldaur takes a break and encourages the band to do their own thing on Benny Carter’s original composition, “Doozy.”

By this point, everyone is well warmed up and the set kicks into high gear. The classic “It Don’t Mean A Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” is a perfect vehicle for Muldaur, taking the performance to the next level. This is such an obvious match, that one can only wonder why she didn’t record it for the album. Her smoldering take on Billy Holliday’s “Lover Man (Where Can You Be)” slows things down, while digging deeper into the emotional nuances of her voice. Her charm is undeniable and the performance is thoroughly engaging. Muldaur wouldn’t get around to releasing this song until almost a decade later. This performance easily stands up to her finest material from this era.

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Posted by on November 17, 2017 in 1960s, blues, folk music, jazz, other

 

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