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“Fleetwood Mac ~ Stevie Nicks GYPSY!!

“Fleetwood Mac ~ Stevie Nicks GYPSY!!

Fleetwood Mac ~ Stevie Nicks GYPSY!!

“Gypsy” is a song by the rock group Fleetwood Mac. Stevie Nicks wrote the song originally circa 1979, and the earliest demo recordings were recorded in early 1980 with Tom Moncrieff for possible inclusion on her solo debut Bella Donna. However, when Nicks’ friend Robin Anderson died of leukemia, the song took on a new significance and Nicks held it over for Fleetwood Mac. “Gypsy” was the second single release and second biggest hit from the Mirage album, following “Hold Me”, reaching a peak of #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks.

Stevie Nicks’ inspiration for the song

There are two points of inspiration behind “Gypsy”, as stated by Stevie Nicks. The first of which is a point of nostalgia for Nicks: her life before Fleetwood Mac. Before joining the iconic band, Nicks lived with Lindsey Buckingham, who would also join Fleetwood Mac. Nicks and Buckingham were partners in both the musical and romantic sense; however, only their musical partnership has survived. Nicks met Buckingham at a high school party, where he was singing “California Dreaming” by the Mamas and the Papas. Nicks joined in with perfect harmony, then they introduced themselves. They didn’t see each other again until college, where they started a relationship, and started a duo called Buckingham Nicks. They barely got by with Nicks’ waitress and cleaning-lady income.[1] They couldn’t afford a bed frame, so they slept on a single mattress, directly on the floor. Nicks says the mattress was decorated in lace, with a vase and a flower at its side. Whenever she feels her famous life getting to her, she goes “back to her roots,” and takes her mattress off the frame and puts it “back to the floor” and decorates it with “some lace, and paper flowers.” [2] It takes her back to the days when she had no wealth—back to herself as a poor gypsy. Some speculate the rest of this song is directed at Buckingham, assuming the lyrics depict her leaving him. On March 31, 2009, Nicks gave an interview to Entertainment Weekly discussing the inspiration for the song:

“Oh boy, I’ve never really spoken about this, so I get verklempt, and then I’ve got the story and I start to screw it up. Okay: In the old days, before Fleetwood Mac, Lindsey [Buckingham] and I had no money, so we had a king-size mattress, but we just had it on the floor. I had old vintage coverlets on it, and even though we had no money it was still really pretty… Just that and a lamp on the floor, and that was it—there was a certain calmness about it. To this day, when I’m feeling cluttered, I will take my mattress off of my beautiful bed, wherever that may be, and put it outside my bedroom, with a table and a little lamp.”

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“AMOS LEE – SWEET PEA (with lyrics)”

“AMOS LEE – SWEET PEA (with lyrics)”

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Amos Lee (born Ryan Anthony Massaro, is an American singer-songwriter whose musical style encompasses folk, rock and soul. He was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the University of South Carolina with a degree in English. After working as a schoolteacher and bartender he began to pursue a career in music. His manager submitted a demo recording to Blue Note Records which resulted in a recording contract and an association with singer Norah Jones.

CAREER

After returning to Philadelphia, Lee worked as a second grade school teacher at the Mary McLeod Bethune School and as a bartender at local music venues. He performed at “open mic” events in the area and, through his contacts with promoters, was hired as an opening act for artists like Mose Allison and B.B. King.[7]

In 2003, Lee’s manager sent a four-song demo CD to several record labels, and the representative at Blue Note Records was “immediately struck by his [Lee’s] voice”.[8] Afterwards, Norah Jones heard Lee’s music while visiting the record company and invited Lee to be the opening act for her 2004 tour.[5]

The friendship between Lee’s manager and the manager for Bob Dylan resulted in Lee touring with Dylan as his opening act in early 2005.[7][11][12][13] Later Lee began touring on his own and recorded his self-titled and “widely praised” debut album of “subtle, folky soul”[6][10][14][15] which included vocals and instrumentation by Norah Jones and members of her band.[8] After it was released, the album peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Top Heatseekers chart and Lee was named one of Rolling Stone’s “Top 10 Artists to Watch.”[9][16] One song from the album, called “Colors”, appeared on the TV show Grey’s Anatomy and in the film Just Like Heaven.[17] Lee’s music received additional media attention when he performed on late night TV shows such as the Late Show with David Letterman[18] and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.[19]

In 2006, Lee recorded his second album, Supply and Demand which was produced by Barrie Maguire. An NPR Music reviewer described it as having “more complicated instrumentation and production” than his prior work.[15] The song “Shout Out Loud” was released as a single and peaked at No. 76 on the Billboard 200,[20] and another song, called

“Sweet Pea”,

was used in an ad campaign.[17]

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“Carole King – It’s Too Late”

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Carole King (born February 9, 1942) is a Grammy Award-winning American singer and songwriter.

Her career began in the 1960s when King, along with her then husband Gerry Goffin, wrote more than two dozen chart hits for numerous artists, many of which have become standards, and she has continued writing for other artists since then. King’s success as a performer in her own right did not come until the 1970s, when she sang her own songs, accompanying herself on the piano, in a series of albums and concerts. After experiencing commercial disappointment with her debut album Writer, King scored her breakthrough with the album Tapestry which topped the U.S. album chart for 15 weeks in 1971 and remained on the charts for more than six years.
Carole King – It’s Too Late:

 

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“Big Yellow Taxi – Joni Mitchell with Lyrics”

“Big Yellow Taxi – Joni Mitchell with Lyrics”



Image: mobilemusic.ru

Big Yellow Taxi” is a song written, composed, and originally recorded by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell in 1970, and originally released on her album Ladies of the Canyon. It was a hit in her native Canada (No. 14) as well as Australia (No. 6) and the UK (No. 11). It only reached No. 67 in the US in 1970, but was later a bigger hit there for her in a live version released in 1974, which peaked at No. 24. Charting versions have also been recorded by The Neighborhood (who had the original top US 40 hit with the track in 1970, peaking at No. 29), Maire BrennanAmy Grant and Counting Crows.

Wikipedia.org

https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2xxrvNZSW4&feature=share

 
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Posted by on April 11, 2018 in folk music, rock

 

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“Eagles Take It Easy (1977)”

“Eagles Take It Easy (1977)”

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The Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1971 by Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner. With five number-one singles, six Grammy Awards, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, were ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the United States according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone‍ ’s list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time” and the band was ranked number 75 on the magazine’s 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[2]

The Eagles are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, having sold more than 150 million records[3]—100 million in the U.S. alone—including 42 million copies of Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and 32 million copies of Hotel California. “Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975)” was the best selling album of the 20th century in the U.S.[4] They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and the highest-selling American band in U.S. history.

The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972, which spawned three top 40 singles: “Take It Easy”, “Witchy Woman”, and “Peaceful Easy Feeling”. Their next album, Desperado (1973), was less successful than the first, only reaching number 41 on the charts; neither of its singles reached the top 40. However, the album contained two of the band’s most popular tracks: “Desperado” and “Tequila Sunrise”. They released On the Border in 1974, adding guitarist Don Felder midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two top 40 singles: “Already Gone” and their first number one, “Best of My Love”.

It was not until 1975’s One of These Nights that the Eagles became arguably America’s biggest band. The album included three top 10 singles: “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, and “Take It to the Limit”, the first hitting the top of the charts. They continued that success and hit their commercial peak in late 1976 with the release of Hotel California, which would go on to sell more than 16 million copies in the U.S. alone and more than 32 million copies worldwide. The album yielded two number-one singles, “New Kid in Town” and “Hotel California”. They released their last studio album for nearly 28 years in 1979 with The Long Run, which spawned three top 10 singles: “Heartache Tonight”, “The Long Run”, and “I Can’t Tell You Why”, the lead single being another chart-topping hit.

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“Something To Talk About ~~Bonnie Raitt ~~ Luck of the Draw”

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Something to Talk About is a song written by Canadian singer-songwriter Shirley Eikhard and recorded by Bonnie Raitt in 1990, for her 1991 album Luck of the Draw. It was released to U.S. radio on June 3, 1991.[2] Three single versions were released: the promo b/w the same song, the 7″ single b/w “One Part Be My Lover” a song written by Raitt with her then husband actor Michael O’Keefe, which was also off Luck of the Draw, and a 12″ single with these two songs and “I Ain’t Gonna Let You Break My Heart Again” off her previous album Nick of Time. In turn, this song was included on the EP version of Raitt’s 2000 single of “The Fundamental Things” taken from her 1998 album Fundamental. It was also included in 2003’s greatest hits compilation The Best of Bonnie Raitt. Live versions also appeared on 1995’s Road Tested and 2006’s Bonnie Raitt and Friends.

The song was popular on multiple formats of radio: it peaked at number 5 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart, number 12 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart, and number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. It is among one of Bonnie Raitt’s most popular songs, along with “I Can’t Make You Love Me”.

Raitt won the Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the Grammy Awards of 1992 for her recording of this song (Oleta Adams, Mariah Carey, Amy Grant and Whitney Houston were the other finalists). The track also received a nomination for Record of the Year, losing to “Unforgettable” by Nat King Cole and Natalie Cole.[3]

Anne Murray wanted to record this song in 1986, but her producers did not think it would be a hit. She still called the album that she released that year Something to Talk About even though it did not include this song.[4]

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“Brook Benton – Rainy Night in Georgia” 

“Brook Benton – Rainy Night in Georgia” 

“Rainy Night in Georgia” is a song written by Tony Joe White in 1962 and popularized by R&B vocalist Brook Benton in 1970.

In a January 17, 2014 interview with music journalist Ray Shasho, Tony Joe White explained the thought process behind the making of ”

Rainy Night in Georgia ” and “Polk Salad Annie”.

When I got out of high school I went to Marietta, Georgia, I had a sister living there. I went down there to get a job and I was playing guitar too at the house and stuff. I drove a dump truck for the highway department and when it would rain you didn’t have to go to work. You could stay home and play your guitar and hangout all night. So those thoughts came back to me when I moved on to Texas about three months later. I heard “Ode to Billie Joe” on the radio and I thought, man, how real, because I am Billie Joe, I know that life. I’ve been in the cotton fields. So I thought if I ever tried to write, I’m going to write about something I know about. At that time I was doing a lot of Elvis and John Lee Hooker onstage with my drummer. No original songs and I hadn’t really thought about it. But after I heard Bobbie Gentry I sat down and thought … well I know about Polk because I had ate a bunch of it and I knew about rainy nights because I spent a lot of rainy nights in Marietta, Georgia. So I was real lucky with my first tries to write something that was not only real and hit pretty close to the bone, but lasted that long. So it was kind of a guide for me then on through life to always try to write what I know about.

In 1969, after several years without a major hit, Benton had signed to a new record label, Cotillion Records (a subsidiary of Atlantic Records). Brought to the attention of producer Jerry Wexler, Benton recorded the song in November 1969 with producer Arif Mardin session personnel present on the hit record included Billy Carter on Organ, Dave Crawford on piano, Cornell Dupree and Jimmy O’Rourke on guitar, Harold Cowart on bass, Tubby Ziegler on drums, and Toots Thielmans on harmonica.

Taken from his “come-back” album

Brook Benton

Today, the melancholy song became an instant hit. In the spring of 1970, the song had topped the Billboard Best Selling Soul Singles chart. It also reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100,[1] and number two on the Adult Contemporary chart. In Canada, the song made #2 on the RPM Magazine Hot Singles chart.

The RIAA certified the single gold for sales of one million copies. In 2004, it was ranked #498 on the List of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

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