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Category Archives: female vocalist

“Alicia Keys – Fallin (Live At Manchester Cathedral)”

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Fallin” is a song by American recording artist Alicia Keys. It served as Keys’ debut single from her debut album, Songs in A Minor (2001). Written and produced by Keys, it was released by J Records to radio and music video outlets in 2001. The song is generally considered her signature song.[1]

The song attained global success, reaching number-one on the US Billboard Hot 100, and reached the top five in several countries. It also received numerous certifications around the world, and is one of the best-selling singles of 2001. In 2009, the single was named the 29th most successful song of the 2000s, on the Billboard Hot 100 Songs of the Decade.[2] It won three Grammy Awards in 2002, including Song of the Year, Best R&B Song, and Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, and was also nominated for Record of the Year.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T10:30:59+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 10:30:59 +0000 31, in female vocalist

 

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“Band Of Gold , Freda Payne , 1970 Vinyl”

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Freda Charcilia Payne (born September 19, 1942)[1][2][3][nb 1] is an American Soul/R&B singer and actress best known for her million selling 1970 hit single, “Band of Gold”. She was also an actress in musicals and film, as well as the host of a TV talk show.[4] Freda is the older sister of former Supreme Scherrie Payne.

Early life and career

Payne was born in Detroit, Michigan,[5] and grew up listening to different jazz singers, such as Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday.[4] As a teenager, she attended the Detroit Institute of Musical Arts; she soon began singing radio commercial jingles, and took part in (and won many) local TV and radio talent shows.[4]

In 1963, she moved to New York City and worked with many different entertainers, including Quincy Jones, Pearl Bailey, and Bill Cosby.[4] The next year, her debut album, a jazz recording with arranger Manny Albam entitled After the Lights Go Down Low and Much More!!!, was released on the Impulse! label.[4] (This album was re-issued on CD in Japan in early 2002, and again in the United States in 2005.) In 1965 she toured Europe for the first time recording an album in Sweden with Don Gardner and Bengt-Arne Wallin. In 1966 she released her second American album, again in the jazz style, How Do You Say I Don’t Love You Anymore, for MGM Records.[4] She also made occasional guest appearances on different television shows including The Merv Griffin Show and The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.[4]

She added theatrical credits to her repertoire: she understudied Leslie Uggams for the Broadway show Hallelujah Baby in 1967,[6] and appeared with the Equity Theatre in a production of Lost in the Stars.[citation needed]

In 1969, her old friends back home in Detroit, Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Edward Holland, Jr., persuaded her to sign with their newly formed record label Invictus.[4] During that same year, her first Invictus single, “Unhooked Generation” (a minor R&B hit), was released.[7] Shortly thereafter, Eddie Holland offered her a song entitled “Band of Gold”, which he along with Brian Holland and Lamont Dozier co-wrote (under the pen name Edythe Wayne) with Ronald Dunbar.[7] In early 1970, the song became an instant pop smash reaching #3 in the US and #1 in the UK for six consecutive weeks; it also gave Payne her first gold record.[4][6] Global sales were estimated at two million.[6] An album of the same name proved to be fairly successful as well.[4] Other Invictus singles included “Deeper and Deeper”, “You Brought the Joy”, and the Vietnam War protest song “Bring the Boys Home” (U.S. Billboard Hot 100 #12, 1971; her second gold record.[6][7] Her other Invictus albums were Contact (1971), The Best of Freda Payne (1972, a compilation which included four new, unissued songs), and her last Invictus album Reaching Out (1973).[4]

In 1973, she left Invictus and recorded albums for ABC/Dunhill and Capitol, but she never found the commercial success that she had enjoyed with Invictus.[4] She recorded a duet “I Wanna See You Soon” with Capitol stablemates Tavares, which was a radio airplay hit in the UK in 1977.[citation needed]

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-14T09:18:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 14 Jan 2019 09:18:00 +0000 31, in entertainment, female vocalist, soul oldies

 

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“Etta James – I’d Rather Go Blind”

“Etta James – I’d Rather Go Blind”

Etta James wrote in her autobiography Rage To Survive that she heard the song outlined by her friend Ellington “Fugi” Jordan when she visited him in prison.She then wrote the rest of the song with Jordan, but for tax reasons gave her songwriting credit to her partner at the time, Billy Foster, singer with doo-wop group The Medallions.

Etta James recorded the song at the FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. It was included on the album Tell Mama and as the B-side of the single of the same name which made number 10 on the Billboard R&B charts, and number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song is also on the 1978 Jerry Wexler-produced album Deep in the Night, but there it is titled ” blind girl” (track 10), some critics have regarded “i’d rather go blind” as of such emotional and poetic quality that it makes release one the great double-sided singles period. critic put song in his book, the heart rock soul: 1001 greatest singles ever made-space”(number 429).

 
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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-12T09:25:10+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 12 Jan 2019 09:25:10 +0000 31, in blues, female vocalist

 

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“BETTYE SWANN – MAKE ME YOURS WITH LYRICS”

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“Make Me Yours” is a 1967 song written by Bettye Swann (Betty Jean Champion) and produced by Arthur Wright,[1] which became a crossover hit for the Louisiana-born Swann. The single went to number one on the Billboard “Hot R&B” chart for two weeks in July 1967 and also peaked at number twenty-one on the pop singles chart.[2]

Betty Barton (born Betty Jean Champion; October 24, 1944), better known by the stage name Bettye Swann, is a retired American singer. She is best known for her 1967 hit song “Make Me Yours”.

She was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, one of 14 children. She grew up in Arcadia, Louisiana, and moved to Los Angeles, California in 1963. Although some sources state that she was in a vocal group known as The Fawns who recorded for Money Records in 1964, she has refuted this, saying that she sang with a trio in Arcadia by that name.[1]

In 1964, she started a solo singing career, changing her name to Bettye Swann at the prompting of local DJ Al Scott, who became her manager. After a minor hit with the self-penned “Don’t Wait Too Long”, her big breakthrough came with “Make Me Yours”, which topped the Billboard R&B charts in July 1967 and made #21 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] In 1968, she split with Scott, moved to Georgia, won a new contract with Capitol Records, and had another hit in 1969 with her cover of the Jeannie Seely hit “Don’t Touch Me” (#14 R&B, #38 Hot 100).

In 1972, she transferred to Atlantic Records and had a couple of minor hits with “Victim of a Foolish Heart” (later covered by Joss Stone) and Merle Haggard’s “Today I Started Loving You Again”. After leaving Money records she lived for a short time in Athens, Georgia.[1] She continued to record until the mid-1970s, but with little commercial success.

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-05T11:20:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 05 Jan 2019 11:20:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, female vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

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“The morning after-Maureen Mcgovern (w/lyrics )”

“The morning after-Maureen Mcgovern (w/lyrics )”

The Morning After” (also known as “The Song from The Poseidon Adventure“) is a song written by Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn for the 1972 film The Poseidon Adventure. It won the 1972 Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 45th Academy Awards in March 1973.[1] After the film’s release, it was recorded by Maureen McGovern and became a hit single for her following its release in May 1973. It was a number-one hit in the US for two weeks during August 1973, and became a Gold record.[

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-05T10:07:52+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 05 Jan 2019 10:07:52 +0000 31, in female vocalist, theme song

 

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“Sade – Maureen”

“Maureen”, a song from Sade’s 1985 album, “Promise”.
Helen Folasade Adu was born on 16 January 1959 in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.[5] Her middle name, Folasade, means “honour confers a crown”.[7] Her parents, Adebisi Adu, a Nigerian lecturer in economics of Yoruba background, and Anne Hayes, an English district nurse, met in London, married in 1955 and moved to Nigeria.[5][8] Her parents separated, however, and Anne Hayes returned to England, taking four-year-old[9] Sade and older brother Banji with her to live with their grandparents near Colchester, Essex. When Sade was 11 years old, she moved to Holland-on-Sea, Essex, to live with her mother.[10] After completing her education at Clacton County High School at age 18 she moved to London and studied fashion design at Saint Martin’s School of Art.[5][9][11]

Sade Discography

Studio albums

1984: Diamond Life

1985: Promise

1988: Stronger Than Pride

1992: Love Deluxe

2000: Lovers Rock

2010: Soldier of Love

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-04T10:23:29+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 04 Jan 2019 10:23:29 +0000 31, in female vocalist, smooth jazz

 

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“Aretha Franklin – Rock With Me”

“Aretha Franklin – Rock With Me”


Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer and musician. Franklin began her career singing gospel at her father, minister C. L. Franklin’s church as a child. In 1960, at the age of 18, Franklin embarked on a secular career, recording for Columbia Records but only achieving modest success. Following her signing to Atlantic Records in 1967, Franklin achieved commercial acclaim and success with songs such as “Respect”, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “Think”. These hits and more helped her to gain the title The Queen of Soul by the end of the 1960s decade.
Franklin eventually recorded a total of 112 charted singles on Billboard, including 77 Hot 100 entries, 17 top ten pop singles, 100 R&B entries and twenty number-one R&B singles, becoming the most charted female artist in the chart’s history. Franklin also recorded acclaimed albums such as I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You, Lady Soul, Young, Gifted & Black and Amazing Grace before experiencing problems with her record company by the mid-1970s. After her father was shot in 1979, Franklin left Atlantic and signed with Arista Records, finding success with her part in the film, The Blues Brothers and with the albums, Jump to It and Who’s Zoomin’ Who?. In 1998, Franklin won international acclaim for singing the opera aria, “Nessun Dorma”, at the Grammys of that year replacing Luciano Pavarotti. Later that same year, she scored her final Top 40 recording with “A Rose Is Still a Rose”. Franklin’s other popular and well known hits include, “Rock Steady”, “Something He Can Feel” (from the soundtrack to the 1976 film Sparkle), “Jump to It”, “Freeway of Love”, “Who’s Zoomin’ Who”, “Sisters Are Doin’ It for Themselves”, “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)” (with George Michael), “It Isn’t, It Wasn’t, It Ain’t Never Gonna Be” (with Whitney Houston) and a remake of The Rolling Stones song “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”.

Franklin has won a total of 18 Grammy Awards and is one of the best-selling female artists of all time, having sold over 75 million records worldwide.[1] Franklin has been honored throughout her career including a 1987 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in which she became the first female performer to be inducted. She was inducted to the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. In August 2012, Franklin was inducted into the GMA Gospel Music Hall of Fame.[2] Franklin is listed in at least two all-time lists on Rolling Stone magazine, including the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, in which she placed number 9, and the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time in which she placed number 1.[3][4]

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2019-01-04T10:21:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles01bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 04 Jan 2019 10:21:00 +0000 31, in black music artists, female vocalist, soul oldies

 

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