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“Counting Crows – Big Yellow Taxi ft. Vanessa Carlton”

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Big Yellow Taxi

” is a song written, composed, and originally recorded by

Joni Mitchell

in 1970, and originally released on her album Ladies of the Canyon. It was a hit in her native Canada (No. 14) as well as Australia (No. 6) and the UK (No. 11). It only reached No. 67 in the US in 1970, but was later a bigger hit there for her in a live version released in 1974, which peaked at No. 24. Charting versions have also been recorded by The Neighborhood (who had the original top US 40 hit with the track in 1970, peaking at No. 29), Maire Brennan, Amy Grant and

Counting Crows.

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“THE KINKS – LOLA”

Singles from Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One
“Lola”
Released: 12 June 1970
“Apeman”

Released: 20 November 1970
Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One, commonly abbreviated to Lola Versus Powerman, or just Lola, is the eighth studio album by British rock band the Kinks, recorded and released in 1970.[1] A concept album, it is a satirical appraisal of the music industry, including song publishers, unions, the press, accountants, business managers, and life on the road.[1] Musically Lola Versus Powerman is varied, described by Stephen Thomas Erlewine as “a wildly unfocused but nonetheless dazzling tour de force”, containing some of Ray Davies’ strongest songs.[1]

Although it appeared during a transitional period for the Kinks, Lola Versus Powerman was a success both critically and commercially for the group, charting in the Top 40 in America[2] and helping restore them in the public eye, making it a “comeback” album. It contained two hit singles: “Lola”, which reached the top 10 in the US and UK, and “Apeman”, which peaked at number five in the UK.[2]

Background and recording Edit

The Kinks, around the time of the recording of Lola Versus Powerman: from left – John Gosling, Dave Davies, Mick Avory, John Dalton, Ray Davies
The Kinks ban by the American Federation of Musicians on performing in America, which had been in force since 1965,[3][4] was lifted in 1969, so the group’s management arranged a North American tour.[5] However, members of the band fell ill, and the tour was shuffled,[5] resulting in the band playing only a few dates in America and Canada.[5] A follow-up tour in 1970 met with similar results, with the group performing at only a select number of venues, with many dates cancelled.[6] The down time between the tours allowed Ray Davies, lead singer and songwriter of the group, to develop the band’s next single, “Lola”.[7]

The Kinks returned to England to start work on their new LP in spring 1970.[8] The group used Morgan Studios, an independent studio in Willesden, London, which was a change for them.[8] They would continue recording their albums there until Preservation, when they switched to their newly purchased studio, Konk.[7] Recording began in late April/early May.[8] Some of the first songs recorded were “Lola”, the outtake “The Good Life”, “Powerman” and “Got to Be Free”.[8] The sessions for “Lola” were especially long, and the recording continued into late May. Davies would recall later how he achieved the signature clangy sound at the beginning of the track:

A National Steel resonator guitar
“ “I remember going into a music store on Shaftesbury Avenue in London when we were about to make ‘Lola’. I said, ‘I want to get a really good guitar sound on this record. I want a Martin.’ And in the corner they had this old 1938 dobro [resonator guitar, in this case a National Steel] that I bought for $150. I put them together on ‘Lola’ which is what makes that clangy sound: the combination of the Martin and the dobro with heavy compression.”[8] ”
The National Steel would play an integral part in many Kinks projects after that. In the 1972 song “Supersonic Rocket Ship”, Ray Davies would use the guitar to create a Caribbean feel for the record. Davies would play it on numerous Top of The Pops appearances, and it would be featured in several music videos the Kinks made in the future, including “Scattered” in 1992.[9]

Keyboardist John Gosling was added to the Kinks’ lineup in May.[10] He auditioned on the final backing master track for “Lola”, and was hired soon after. He was initially taken on solely for their upcoming US tour, but his post evolved into a more permanent position soon after. Gosling would remain with the band until 1977, departing after the release of Sleepwalker.[8] Dubbing for “Lola” was finished in June.[11] Recording for the LP was completed by October, and it was mixed throughout the remainder of the month.[12] Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One was released on 27 November 1970.

For “Lola”, Ray Davies overdubed the trademarked word “Coca-Cola” with the generic “cherry-cola” for the mono single release, as product placement rules meant the BBC (being a public service broadcaster) would not have played it.[11] The lyrics in the gatefold sleeve of the original LP use the “cherry-cola” line, though the album track contains the original stereo “Coca-Cola” version. A similar situation was encountered with the song “Apeman”, concerning the line “the air pollution is a-foggin’ up my eyes”.[11] “Fogging” was mistaken for “fucking”, and consequently Ray Davies had to re-record this line prior to its single release.[11]

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“John Mayer – Waiting on the World to Change” on YouTube

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“Waiting on the World to Change” is the first single released from John Mayer’s 2006 studio album, Continuum. The song enjoyed commercial success as a single and won the Grammy for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance at the 49th Grammy Awards.

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http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=oBIxScJ5rlY&feature=youtube_gdata_player

 
 

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Natasha Bedingfield – Pocket full of Sunshine Lyrics

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“Pocketful of Sunshine”

is a song performed by British singer and songwriter Natasha Bedingfield, released as the second single from her second North American studio album, of the same name (2008). Bedingfield co-wrote the song together with American songwriter Danielle Brisebois and American musician and songwriter John Shanks; Shanks also produced the track as well as performing on most of the instruments present. Epic Records serviced the song to mainstream radios on 11 February 2008 in the United States. It received an international release in spring 2011 to promote the release of Strip Me Away (2011).

Bedingfield noted “Pocketful of Sunshine” as her favorite, stating that it centers on escaping from one’s troubles. It adapts dance-pop and adult contemporary styles, differing from her previous recordings. Lyrically, the song discusses escapism and finding a peaceful place in difficult situations. The message is amplified by the melancholic tone of the lyrics mixing with the exuberance displayed in Bedingfield’s voice. “Pocketful of Sunshine” was well received by contemporary music critics; the majority of them named it as one of the album’s highlights. Several critics also praised it as a bright and lively summer tune.

“Pocketful of Sunshine” experienced commercial success in North America, peaking at number five in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and sold three million downloads, becoming her most successful single there. It also charted in Canada, peaking at #3 and receiving the platinum certification. It however did not replicate the success in North America as it charted moderately in several countries, reaching the top thirty in international territories.

The music video for

“Pocketful of Sunshine”

was released in spring 2008 and features Bedingfield escaping from a stressful situation and dancing on a roof with other background dancers. The video also portrays scenes of other people escaping their troubles, coming to Bedingfield for comfort. The single has been used widely in the media, being featured in movies and television series like Easy A, Degrassi: The Next Generation and The Ugly Truth.

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“Phil Collins Another Day In Paradise Lyrics”

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“Another Day in Paradise” is a protest song recorded by English drummer and singer Phil Collins. Produced by Collins along with Hugh Padgham, it was released as the first single from his number-one album …But Seriously (1989). As with his song for Genesis, “Man on the Corner”, the track has as its subject the problem of homelessness;[1] as such, the song was a substantial departure from the dance-pop music of his previous album, No Jacket Required (1985).

Collins sings the song from a third-person perspective, observing as a man crosses the street to ignore a homeless woman, and he implores listeners not to turn a blind eye to homelessness because, by drawing a religious allusion, “it’s just another day for you and me in paradise”. Collins also appeals directly to God by singing: “Oh Lord, is there nothing more anybody can do? Oh Lord, there must be something you can say?”

The song was a No. 1 worldwide, and eventually became one of the most successful songs of his solo career. It won Collins and Padgham the Grammy Award for Record of the Year at the 1991 awards ceremony, while it was also nominated for Song of the Year, Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male and Best Music Video, Short Form. “Another Day in Paradise” also won an award for Best British Single at the 1990 BRIT Awards. Despite the awards gained following its release, the song has received a largely negative reaction from music critics. In the U.S., it was the final number-one single of the 1980s on the Billboard Hot 100, and the first (and Collins’ only) of the 1990s.

Collins and David Crosby’s live performance of the song at the 1991 Grammy Awards was released on the 1994 album Grammy’s Greatest Moments Volume I.[2] In 2009, Collins’s version was listed at 86th on Billboard ’​s Greatest Songs of All Time.[3] “Another Day in Paradise” has since been covered by several artists, including Brandy, and her brother Ray J, Jam Tronik, Axxis, Novecento, and Hank Marvin.

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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in 1970s, entertainment, male vocalist

 

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“Delaney & Bonnie – Only You Know And I Know”

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Delaney & Bonnie were an American musical duo composed of husband-and-wife singer/songwriters Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett. They also fronted a rock/soul ensemble called Delaney & Bonnie and Friends, whose members at different times included Duane Allman, Gregg Allman, George Harrison, Leon Russell, Bobby Whitlock, Dave Mason, Rita Coolidge, King Curtis, and Eric Clapton.

Career

Delaney Bramlett (July 1, 1939, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, United States – December 27, 2008, Los Angeles, California, United States) learned the guitar in his youth, and moved to Los Angeles in 1959.[1] He became a session musician; his most notable early work was as a member of the Shindogs, the house band for the ABC-TV series Shindig! (1964–66), which also featured guitarist/keyboardist Leon Russell.[2]

Bonnie Bramlett (née Bonnie Lynn O’Farrell, born November 8, 1944, Alton, Illinois, United States) was an accomplished singer at an early age, performing with blues guitarist Albert King at age 14 and in the Ike & Tina Turner Revue at 15[3] – the first-ever white Ikette “for three days in a black wig and Man Tan skin darkener.”[4] She moved to Los Angeles in 1967, and met and married Delaney later that year.

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“Sweet Dreams Eurythmics with lyrics”

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“Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” is a song written and performed by the British new wave music duo Eurythmics (Annie Lennox and David A. Stewart). It was released as a single in early 1983, the title track of their album Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This), and was one of their biggest hits, and the song which provided the group with their breakthrough into commercial success. Its striking music video helped to propel the song to number 2 on the UK Singles Chart and number 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100, on 3 September 1983, after The Police’s “Every Breath You Take” had held it off at number 2 for four consecutive weeks in August. It was the fourth and final single released from the Sweet Dreams album in the UK and the first single released by Eurythmics in the US.

“Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” is arguably Eurythmics’ signature song. Following its success, their previous single, “Love Is a Stranger”, was re-released and also became a worldwide hit. On Rolling Stone’s The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time issue in 2003, “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” was ranked number 356; it was the Eurythmics’s only song to appear on the list.[6] Eurythmics have regularly performed the song in all their live sets since 1982, and it is often performed by Lennox on her solo tours.

In 1991, the song was remixed and reissued to promote Eurythmics’ Greatest Hits album. It re-charted in the UK, reaching number 48, and was also a moderate hit in dance clubs. Another remix by Steve Angello was released in France in 2006, along with the track “I’ve Got a Life” (peaking at number 10).

In 1999, Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox reunited and released Peace, their first album of new material in 10 years. Its lead single, “17 Again”, directly references this song, with lyrics that culminate in the declaration, “Sweet Dreams are made of anything that gets you in the scene.” The song ends on a refrain of the first verse from Sweet Dreams.

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