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“Submerged In the Ithaa Undersea Restaurant!”

“Submerged In the Ithaa Undersea Restaurant!”

Ithaa, which means mother-of-pearl in an undersea restaurant located 5 metres (16 ft) below sea level at the Conrad Maldives Rangali Island in  Alif Dhaal Atoll in the Republic of Maldives.

Overview
The 5-by-9-metre (16 by 30 ft) mostly acrylic structure, has a capacity of 14 people and is encased in R-Cast acrylic with a transparent roof offering a 270°panoramic underwater view.

The restaurant was designed and constructed by M.J. Murphy Ltd – a design consultancy based in New Zealand – and was opened on in April 2005, describing itself as the world’s first undersea restaurant. Food served in the restaurant has changed over the years and has more recently been described as contemporary

European withAsian influences.

Ithaa’s entrance is a spiral staircase in a thatched pavilion at the end of a jetty. The tsunami which followed the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake topped at 0.31 metres (1 ft 0 in) below the staircase entrance, and caused no damage to the restaurant.

The restaurant is also used for private parties and weddings.[3] In April 2010, to celebrate Ithaa’s 5th anniversary, the restaurant could be booked as an overnight residence. This “underwater suite” promotion continued until April 2011.[4]

en.m.wikipedia.org

If you’re venturing to the Maldives, you’re guaranteed a stunning getaway. Ithaa is widely considered the most beautiful restaurant in the world. Located in the Hilton Maldives Resort and Spa, Ithaa sits about 16 feet below the surface of the Indian Ocean, with enough space for just 14 people. Dinner will run nearly $400 a guest, but the 270-degree panoramic view alone is worth it.

~WHAT’S ON THE MENU~



https://youtu.be/HBi_wUI6720

http://beyondwords.life/the-most-expensive-restaurants-in-the-world/

Going deeper underwater…here:

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2017 in brunch, entertainment

 

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Menu In The Sky – New Zealand (South Pacific)

How comfortable would you be, having an exquisite, delicious meal midair New Zealand?


“Dinner in the Sky is a hosted dining table, suspended at a height of 50 metres by a team of professionals”.


https://m.facebook.com/DinnerintheskyANZ/


New Zealand’s cuisine is largely driven by local ingredients and seasonal variations. An island nation with a primarily agricultural economy, New Zealand yields produce from land and sea. Similar to the cuisine of Australia, the cuisine of New Zealand is a diverse British-based cuisine, with Mediterranean and Pacific Rim influences as the country becomes more cosmopolitan.

Historical influences came from Māori cultureNew American cuisineSoutheast AsianEast Asian, and South Asian culinary traditions have become popular since the 1970s.

In New Zealand households, dinner is the main meal of the day, when families gather and share their evening together. Restaurants and takeaways provide an increasing proportion of the diet.

Māori cuisineEdit

hāngi dinner as served to tourists.

When the indigenous Māori arrived in New Zealand from tropical Polynesia they had a number of food plants, including kūmara (sweet potato), taro and . The plants grew well only in the north of the North Island. Native New Zealand plants such as fernroot became a more important part of the diet, along with insects such as the huhu grub. Problems with horticulture were made up for by an abundance of bird and marine life. The large flightless moa were soon hunted to extinction.[citation needed] Rāhui (resource restrictions) included forbidding the hunting of certain species in particular places or at certain times of year, so that the numbers could regenerate.

Preparation of a modern hāngi for tourists at Mitai Maori Village, Rotorua.

Like other Polynesian people, Māori cooked food in earth ovens, known in New Zealand as hāngi, although the word umu is also used[citation needed] as in other Pacific languages. Stones are heated by fire and food packed in leaves are placed on top. The packs are further covered with foliage and cloth, or, wet sacks, then earth. Other cooking methods included roasting and, in geothermal areas, boiling or steaming using natural hot springs and pools. Occasionally food would be boiled in non-geothermal areas by putting hot stones into a bowl with water and the food; and some food was also cooked over the open fire. Some foods were preserved using smoke, air-drying, or layers of fat—particularly muttonbirds. Māori were one of the few people to have no form of alcoholic beverage.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

“Dinner at Sky Tower, Auckland” 

 

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“Roberta Flack- The Closer I Get To You – Tradução – Letra em Inglês e Português”

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The Closer I Get to You” is a romantic ballad performed by American jazz, soul, R&B, and folk singer-songwriter Roberta Flack and American soul musician Donny Hathaway. The song was written by James Mtume and Reggie Lucas, two former members of Miles Davis’ band, who were members of Flack’s band at the time. Produced by Atlantic Records, the song was released on Flack’s 1977 album Blue Lights in the Basement, and as a single in 1978. It became a major crossover hit, becoming Flack’s biggest commercial hit after her success with her 1973 solo single, “Killing Me Softly with His Song”. Originally set as a solo-single, Flack’s manager, David Franklin, suggested a duet with Hathaway, which resulted in the finished work.

The Closer I Get to You” spent two weeks as number one on the Hot Soul Singles chart in April 1978, and peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100. The song charted in the top ten spots for fourteen weeks in Canada and one week in France. It was eventually certified gold in the United States on May 1978, and became one of their most familiar duets.

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“SHOCKING BLUE – VENUS”

“SHOCKING BLUE – VENUS”

“Venus” is a 1969 song written by Robbie van Leeuwen. In 1970, the Dutch rock band Shocking Blue took the song to number one in nine countries. In 1981 it was sampled as part of the Stars on 45 medley. In 1986, the British female pop group Bananarama returned the song to number one in seven countries. The composition has been featured in numerous films, television shows and commercials, and covered dozens of times by artists around the world.

Shocking Blue version

Shocking Blue in 1970
Background
Released in late 1969 as a single from the group’s second album At Home, Shocking Blue’s single reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 7 February 1970. RIAA certification came on 28 January 1970 for selling over one million copies in the US, garnering a gold record. Worldwide, the single sold over 7.5 million copies.[3]

The song’s lead vocals are performed by Mariska Veres. The song’s music and lyrics are written by Robbie van Leeuwen, the band’s guitarist, sitarist and background vocalist, who also produced, along with record producer Jerry Ross. Van Leeuwen originally miswrote the line “…the goddess on the mountain top…” as “…the godness on the mountain top…”. This was corrected in later versions. The Hohner electric piano on the release was played by Cees Schrama.

Van Leeuwen was inspired by “The Banjo Song”, a composition by Tim Rose that set Stephen Foster’s lyrics to “Oh! Susanna” to a completely new melody.

“Venus” was remixed and re-released by dance producers The BHF (Bisiach Hornbostel Ferrucci) Team in May 1990, scoring the group a Top 10 hit in the UK and Australia 21 years after the release of the original. The remix featured a hip house rhythm and samples. An instrumental version was also released independently under the producer’s alias “Don Pablo’s Animals”. The instrumental version (credited only to Don Pablos Animals – without referencing Shocking Blue) became the highest charting version of the song.[4] The single began with a sample from James Brown’s 1988 hit “The Payback Mix (Part One)”. This release of “Venus” peaked at number 4 on the UK Singles Chart[4] and number 8 in Australia in 1990.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

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“Blood, Sweat & Tears – Spinning Wheel (album version)”

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“Spinning Wheel” is the title of a popular song from 1969 by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. The song was written by the band’s Canadian lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas and appears on their self-titled album.

Released as a single in 1969, “Spinning Wheel” peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in July of that year, remaining in the runner-up position for three weeks.[1] In August of that year, the song topped the Billboard easy listening chart for two weeks.[2] It was also a crossover hit, reaching #45 on the US R&B chart.

“Spinning Wheel” was nominated for three Grammy Awards at the 1970 ceremony, winning in the category Best Instrumental Arrangement. The arranger for the song was the band’s saxophonist, Fred Lipsius. It was nominated for Record of the Year and Song of the Year; the album won the Grammy for Album of the Year.

Clayton-Thomas was quoted as describing the song as being “written in an age when psychedelic imagery was all over lyrics…it was my way of saying, ‘Don’t get too caught up, because everything comes full circle’.”[2]

The song ends with the 1815 Austrian tune “O Du Lieber Augustin” (“The More We Get Together” or “Did You Ever See a Lassie?”)[citation needed] and drummer Bobby Colomby’s comment: “That wasn’t too good”, followed by laughter from the rest of the group. According to producer James William Guercio this section was added in at the last minute after the end of the master tape was recorded over accidentally by an engineer at the studio. Most of this section and the trumpet solo were edited out for the single version. The eight-bar piano solo which precedes the trumpet solo on the album version is overlapped with guitar on the single version before the last verse.

Among artists who have covered “Spinning Wheel” are Shirley Bassey, who included the song on her 1970 album Something, and Nancy Wilson, who covered it in the Hawaii Five-O episode “Trouble in Mind,” which originally aired September 23, 1970. In 1970 Marianne Mendt released a version of the tune in Austria, as “A g’scheckert’s Hutschpferd” and Barbara Eden performed a live version [3] that aired in the U.S. Jazz organist Dr. Lonnie Smith recorded an extended instrumental version for his 1970 Blue Note album Drives.[4] James Brown scored a minor hit in 1971 with an instrumental version of the song, reaching #90 on the Billboard Hot 100.[5][6] The Canadian a cappella music group, Cadence also covered this song. In 1970 P.P. Arnold recorded a version produced by Barry Gibb but it was not released. An instrumental rendition of this song was used as a cue on the first Wheel of Fortune pilot titled Shopper’s Bazaar.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“CYNDI LAUPER – Time After Time”

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“Time After Time” is a song by American singer-songwriter Cyndi Lauper. It was recorded by Lauper for her debut studio album, She’s So Unusual (1983), with Rob Hyman (co-writer and founding member of the rock band The Hooters) contributing backing vocals. The track was produced by Rick Chertoff and released as a single on January 27, 1984. It was the second single to be released from the album and became Lauper’s first #1 hit in the U.S. The song was written in the album’s final stages, after “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun”, “She Bop” and “All Through the Night” had been written. The writing began with the title, which Lauper had seen in TV Guide magazine, referring to the 1979 science fiction film Time After Time.

“Time After Time” is composed of simple keyboard-synth chords, bright, jangly guitars, clock-ticking percussion, and elastic bassline, and lyrically is a love song of devotion. Most music critics gave the song positive reviews, with most commending the song for being a solid and memorable love song, as well as considering the track Lauper’s best song. The song has been selected as one of the Best Love Songs of All Time by many media outlets, including Rolling Stone, Nerve, MTV and many others.[1] “Time After Time” was also nominated for a Grammy Award for Song of the Year at the 1985 edition.[2] The song was a success on the charts, becoming her first number-one single on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on June 9, 1984, and remaining there for two weeks. Worldwide, the song is her most commercially successful single, after “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”, and reached number three on the UK Singles Chart and number six on the ARIA Singles Chart. The song is also known for its numerous covers by a wide range of artists, including Miles Davis, who recorded an instrumental version for his 1985 album, You’re Under Arrest, and Eva Cassidy, whose cover of the song appears on her posthumous album of the same name. R&B singer Lil Mo also covered the song for her 2001 debut album Based on a True Story. An acoustic version was sung by Lauper with Sarah McLachlan on her 2005 album, The Body Acoustic.[3] Lauper has performed the song live with Patti LaBelle twice in 1985 and 2004 and with Sarah McLachlan at the American Music Awards of 2005,[4] as well as with rapper Lil’ Kim in 2009. The song has been featured numerous times in popular culture including the films Napoleon Dynamite, View From the Top, Strictly Ballroom, Up In the Air, John Tucker Must Die, Prom Night, Clockstoppers, Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, Sunny, Paranoia, Good Deeds, Nebraska, Irresistible, This Is Where I Leave You, Brown Sugar, and Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion as well as the television shows Cold Case, Stars in Their Eyes, Smallville, Veronica Mars, The Simpsons, The New Adventures of Old Christine, Ugly Betty, EastEnders, Accused, Parks and Recreation, Atop the Fourth Wall, Psych, Defiance, Grey’s Anatomy, Glee and My Name is Earl.

enjoy.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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BORROWED WORDS – MIMICKING THE FRENCH LANGUAGE       

BORROWED WORDS – MIMICKING THE FRENCH LANGUAGE       

“The problem with the French,  is that they don’t have a word for entrepreneur,” said George W. Bush, USA President (2000 – 2008).

French is a Indo-European language spoken in France, Belgium, Swizerland, Canada, Louisiana, West Africa, Caribbean and Indo-China.

There are hundreds of words borrowed from French into English – only a selection is given here. They can be grouped into several classes:

Food and eating (“biscuit”, “menu”), military terms (“camouflage”, “coup d’etat”), diplomatic words (“diplomat”, “regime”), entertainment (“ballet”, “sport”) and many others.
For more on this interesting topic, visit source:

http://www.krysstal.com

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2017 in entertainment, FRENCH FRIDAYS

 

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