RSS

Category Archives: entertainment

“Stevie Wonder “Master Blaster”

  • image

“Master Blaster (Jammin)” is a 1980 single by American singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder from his 1980 album Hotter than July.

The song, built on a heavy reggae feel, is an ode to reggae legend Bob Marley; Wonder had been performing live with Marley (billing him as an opening act) on his US tour in the fall of that year. Lyrics mention “children of Jah” and the end of the civil war in Zimbabwe.

The song was the leading single from Wonder’s Hotter than July album. It was a major hit, spending seven weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B singles chart, reaching number five on Billboard’s pop singles chart in the fall of 1980[1] and peaking at number two on the UK Singles chart. The song includes the line “hotter than July”, per the album title.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

Video

 “Sade The Sweetest Taboo with Lyrics” 

“The Sweetest Taboo” is a song by English band Sade, taken from their second album Promise (1985). While the song peaked at #31 on the UK Singles Chart, it fared considerably better in the United States, where it reached #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1986, remaining in the Top 40 for 13 weeks. It also became the band’s second consecutive number-one hit on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, following “Smooth Operator”. It is considered the group’s signature song.
“The Sweetest Taboo” is mentioned in the lyrics of Prince’s 2005 charity single “S.S.T.”, as well as in Mos Def’s 1999 song “Ms. Fat Booty”.

The French duo Les Nubians recorded a song called “Tabou” on their 1998 album Princesses Nubiennes, credited as a French adaptation of “The Sweetest Taboo”, although the lyrics are significantly different.

British artists Glamma Kid and Shola Ama sampled the song in 1999 in a somewhat more upbeat version with both a ragga and R&B feel to it. It was released as a single only.

The song was featured in a 1985 episode of the US daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

Tags:

“New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival Lineup”

Image:  Dreamtime.com

It’s almost that time of year again- time to sip icy cold rosemint herbal iced tea, snack on warm crawfish bread, and sway to the music of local and international musicians under the warm New Orleans sun. The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival is one of the most celebrated festivals in New Orleans and takes place every year during the last two weekends of April. Jazz Fest has been around for almost fifty years and gets bigger and better every year.


During these two weekends, locals and out-of-towners get together to enjoy the culture of New Orleans with the various food, crafts, performances that Jazz Fest has to offer. Contrary to the name, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival is more than just jazz music.


read more from source:

http://www.frenchquarter.com/new-orleans-jazz-fest-lineup/

 

Tags:

“Bird Flew!” (In flew Hens-a)

 
1 Comment

Posted by on March 6, 2017 in entertainment, Monday Madness

 

Tags:

Are You Social Network Savvy?

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 27, 2017 in entertainment

 

Tags:

“Counting Crows – Big Yellow Taxi ft. Vanessa Carlton”

image

Big Yellow Taxi

” is a song written, composed, and originally recorded by

Joni Mitchell

in 1970, and originally released on her album Ladies of the Canyon. It was a hit in her native Canada (No. 14) as well as Australia (No. 6) and the UK (No. 11). It only reached No. 67 in the US in 1970, but was later a bigger hit there for her in a live version released in 1974, which peaked at No. 24. Charting versions have also been recorded by The Neighborhood (who had the original top US 40 hit with the track in 1970, peaking at No. 29), Maire Brennan, Amy Grant and

Counting Crows.

en.m.Wikipedia.com

 

Tags: , ,

“THE KINKS – LOLA”

Singles from Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One
“Lola”
Released: 12 June 1970
“Apeman”

Released: 20 November 1970
Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One, commonly abbreviated to Lola Versus Powerman, or just Lola, is the eighth studio album by British rock band the Kinks, recorded and released in 1970.[1] A concept album, it is a satirical appraisal of the music industry, including song publishers, unions, the press, accountants, business managers, and life on the road.[1] Musically Lola Versus Powerman is varied, described by Stephen Thomas Erlewine as “a wildly unfocused but nonetheless dazzling tour de force”, containing some of Ray Davies’ strongest songs.[1]

Although it appeared during a transitional period for the Kinks, Lola Versus Powerman was a success both critically and commercially for the group, charting in the Top 40 in America[2] and helping restore them in the public eye, making it a “comeback” album. It contained two hit singles: “Lola”, which reached the top 10 in the US and UK, and “Apeman”, which peaked at number five in the UK.[2]

Background and recording Edit

The Kinks, around the time of the recording of Lola Versus Powerman: from left – John Gosling, Dave Davies, Mick Avory, John Dalton, Ray Davies
The Kinks ban by the American Federation of Musicians on performing in America, which had been in force since 1965,[3][4] was lifted in 1969, so the group’s management arranged a North American tour.[5] However, members of the band fell ill, and the tour was shuffled,[5] resulting in the band playing only a few dates in America and Canada.[5] A follow-up tour in 1970 met with similar results, with the group performing at only a select number of venues, with many dates cancelled.[6] The down time between the tours allowed Ray Davies, lead singer and songwriter of the group, to develop the band’s next single, “Lola”.[7]

The Kinks returned to England to start work on their new LP in spring 1970.[8] The group used Morgan Studios, an independent studio in Willesden, London, which was a change for them.[8] They would continue recording their albums there until Preservation, when they switched to their newly purchased studio, Konk.[7] Recording began in late April/early May.[8] Some of the first songs recorded were “Lola”, the outtake “The Good Life”, “Powerman” and “Got to Be Free”.[8] The sessions for “Lola” were especially long, and the recording continued into late May. Davies would recall later how he achieved the signature clangy sound at the beginning of the track:

A National Steel resonator guitar
“ “I remember going into a music store on Shaftesbury Avenue in London when we were about to make ‘Lola’. I said, ‘I want to get a really good guitar sound on this record. I want a Martin.’ And in the corner they had this old 1938 dobro [resonator guitar, in this case a National Steel] that I bought for $150. I put them together on ‘Lola’ which is what makes that clangy sound: the combination of the Martin and the dobro with heavy compression.”[8] ”
The National Steel would play an integral part in many Kinks projects after that. In the 1972 song “Supersonic Rocket Ship”, Ray Davies would use the guitar to create a Caribbean feel for the record. Davies would play it on numerous Top of The Pops appearances, and it would be featured in several music videos the Kinks made in the future, including “Scattered” in 1992.[9]

Keyboardist John Gosling was added to the Kinks’ lineup in May.[10] He auditioned on the final backing master track for “Lola”, and was hired soon after. He was initially taken on solely for their upcoming US tour, but his post evolved into a more permanent position soon after. Gosling would remain with the band until 1977, departing after the release of Sleepwalker.[8] Dubbing for “Lola” was finished in June.[11] Recording for the LP was completed by October, and it was mixed throughout the remainder of the month.[12] Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One was released on 27 November 1970.

For “Lola”, Ray Davies overdubed the trademarked word “Coca-Cola” with the generic “cherry-cola” for the mono single release, as product placement rules meant the BBC (being a public service broadcaster) would not have played it.[11] The lyrics in the gatefold sleeve of the original LP use the “cherry-cola” line, though the album track contains the original stereo “Coca-Cola” version. A similar situation was encountered with the song “Apeman”, concerning the line “the air pollution is a-foggin’ up my eyes”.[11] “Fogging” was mistaken for “fucking”, and consequently Ray Davies had to re-record this line prior to its single release.[11]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
 

Tags: ,

 
%d bloggers like this: