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“What A Difference A Day Makes (commercial – plus)

Dinah Washington (born Ruth Lee Jones; August 29, 1924 – December 14, 1963), was an American singer and pianist, who has been cited as “the most popular black female recording artist of the ’50s”. Primarily a jazz vocalist, she performed and recorded in a wide variety of styles including blues, R&B, and traditional pop music, and gave herself the title of “Queen of the Blues”. She is a 1986 inductee of the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

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CHOICE OF ROMANTIC VIEWS:


 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T10:00:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 10:00:00 +0000 31, in classic music, entertainment, reflections

 

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“THE MOODY BLUES – GO NOW” with lyrics …

Go Now
For the 1995 television film, see Go Now (film).
Not to be confused with If You Gotta Go, Go Now, a song by Bob Dylan.

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“Go Now” is a song composed by Larry Banks and Milton Bennett. It was first recorded in January 1964 by Bessie Banks, and later became associated with The Moody Blues.

Bessie Banks version

“Go Now”

Single by Bessie Banks
B-side “It Sounds Like My Baby”
Released 1964
Format 7″
Genre
R&B soul
Length 2:40
Label
Tiger Blue Cat
Writer(s)
Larry Banks Milton Bennett
Producer(s) Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
Bessie Banks singles chronology
“Do It Now”
(1963) “Go Now”
(1964) “I Can’t Make It (Without You Baby)”
(1967)

The song was first recorded by Larry Banks’s former wife, Bessie Banks. A 1962 demo recording by Bessie of the song was heard by songwriters and record producers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, who re-recorded it and first released it in early 1964 on their Tiger label, and later reissued it on the Blue Cat label, the R&B/soul imprint of Red Bird.[1][2] Her version reached #40 on the Cashbox R&B singles chart.[3]

Bessie Banks later commented:

I remember 1963 Kennedy was assassinated; it was announced over the radio. At the time, I was rehearsing in the office of Leiber and Stoller. We called it a day. Everyone was in tears. “Come back next week and we will be ready to record ‘Go Now'”; and we did so. I was happy and excited that maybe this time I’ll make it. ‘Go Now’ was released in January 1964, and right away it was chosen Pick Hit of the Week on W.I.N.S. Radio. That means your record is played for seven days. Four days went by, I was so thrilled. On day five, when I heard the first line, I thought it was me, but all of a sudden, I realized it wasn’t. At the end of the song it was announced, “The Moody Blues singing ‘Go Now’.” I was too out-done. This was the time of the English Invasion and the end of Bessie Banks’ career, so I thought. America’s DJs had stopped promoting American artists.[1]

Banks’ recollections are questionable, because her single was released in the US in January 1964, and The Moody Blues’ version was not released until November 1964 (in the UK) and January 1965 in the US.

The Moody Blues Version

“Go Now”!was made popular internationally later in 1964 when an English beat group from Birmingham named The Moody Blues recorded it, with Denny Laine on guitar and lead vocals. When Denny Laine first heard Bessie Banks’s version, he immediately told the rest of the band that they needed to record the song.

In contrast to other songs from their debut album The Magnificent Moodies, “Go Now!” contained many early elements of what later would become progressive rock, such as the lush instrumentation, the innovative variations of the Fifties Progression, as well as strong baroque elements that would later become hallmarks of prog rock.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T09:55:15+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 09:55:15 +0000 31, in 1970s, entertainment

 

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Blue Man Group

Blue Man Group

Blue Man Group is a performance artcompany formed in 1991. It is best known for its stage productions around the world. It combines many different categories of music and art, both popular and obscure in these shows.
Blue Man Group

Blue Man4 (SP) 2009 Brazil.JPG

Blue Man Group in Brazil in 2009

Blue Man Group currently has continuing theatrical productions in Las Vegas, Orlando, Boston, Chicago, New York Cityand Berlin. In addition to the stage theatre show, Blue Man Group has toured the globe with multiple national and global tours; been a guest on various TV programs as both characters and performers; appeared on the Norwegian Cruise Line ship, Epic; released multiple studio albums; contributed to a number of film scores; performed with orchestras around the US, and appeared in advertising campaigns. Blue Man Group was referenced in a story line of the TV series Arrested Development.

In July 2017, Cirque de Soleil purchased the Blue Man Productions for an undisclosed sum. Cirque announced plans to expand Blue Man Group globally and diversify the live entertainment production.

Blue Man Group grew out of a collaboration between three close friends, Chris Wink, Matt Goldman and Phil Stanton, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in 1988. It originated as a celebration to the end of the 1980s. The three men wore blue masks and led a procession that included the burning of a Rambo doll and a piece of the Berlin Wall. The stunt caught the attention of MTV’s Kurt Loder, who covered the event, and the strange Blue Men gained attention. The Blue Man character emerged from small “disturbances” on the streets of the city, growing into small shows at downtown clubs, eventually becoming a full performance at the Astor Place Theatre in 1991.

In July 2017, it was announced Blue Man Group was bought by Cirque Du Soleil who announced they would expand.

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T09:28:05+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 09:28:05 +0000 31, in entertainment, music, pop music

 

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“Rod Stewart – They Can’t Take That Away from Me”

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They Can’t Take That Away from Me
For the song by Mariah Carey, see Can’t Take That Away (Mariah’s Theme). For JoJo song, see Can’t Take That Away From Me.

“They Can’t Take That Away from Me” is a 1937 song (see 1937 in music) written by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin and introduced by Fred Astaire in the 1937 film Shall We Dance.

Overview
The song is performed by Astaire on the foggy deck of the ferry from New Jersey to Manhattan. It is sung to Ginger Rogers, who remains silent listening throughout. No dance sequence follows, which was unusual for the Astaire-Rogers numbers. Astaire and Rogers did dance to it later in their last movie The Barkleys of Broadway (1949) in which they played a married couple with marital issues. The song, in the context of Shall We Dance, notes some of the things that Peter (Astaire) will miss about Linda (Rogers). The lyrics include “the way you wear your hat, the way you sip your tea”, and “the way you hold your knife, the way we danced till three.” Each verse is followed by the line “no, no, they can’t take that away from me.” The basic meaning of the song is that even if the lovers part, though physically separated the memories cannot be forced from them. Thus it is a song of mixed joy and sadness.

The verse references the song “The Song Is Ended (but the Melody Lingers On)” by Irving Berlin:

Our romance won’t end on a sorrowful note, though by tomorrow you’re gone. The song is ended, but as the songwriter wrote, ‘the melody lingers on.’ They may take you from me, I’ll miss your fond caress, but though they take you from me I’ll still possess….
George Gershwin died two months after the film’s release, and he was posthumously nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 1937 Oscars.

The song is featured in Kenneth Branagh’s musical version of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost (2000), in Stephen Herek’s Mr. Holland’s Opus (1995), and in Barry Levinson’s Rain Man (1988). The melodic hardcore band Strung Out also sampled the song for the intro of “Analog”, the opening track on their 2004 album Exile in Oblivion.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T08:15:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 08:15:00 +0000 31, in ballad, coffee, entertainment, music

 

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“IT’S GONNA TAKE A MIRACLE – Deniece Williams”

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Deniece Williams (born June Deniece Chandler; June 3, 1950) is an American singer, songwriter and record producer who achieved success in the 1970s and 1980s. Williams is known for hits such as “Free” (1976), “Silly” (1981), “It’s Gonna Take a Miracle” (1982), “Let’s Hear It for the Boy” (1984), and for her duets with Johnny Mathis.

Career

Born in Gary, Indiana, Williams attended Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, in the hopes of becoming a registered nurse and an anesthetist, but dropped out after a year and a half. “You have to be a good student to be in college, and I wasn’t.”[1] She also performed on the side during that time. (“I got a part-time job singing at a club, Casino Royal, and I liked it. It was a lot of fun.”) During those years Williams worked also in a telephone company and as a ward clerk in the Chicago Mercy Hospital.[1] As Deniece Chandler, she recorded for The Toddlin’ Town group of labels and one of those early records, “I’m Walking Away”, released on Toddlin’ Town’s Lock Records subsidiary in the late 1960s, is a favorite on England’s Northern Soul scene. In the 1970s she became a backup vocalist for Stevie Wonder as part of “Wonderlove”.

She left Wonder in 1975 and after signing to Columbia Records, she teamed up with two famed producers: Maurice White of Earth, Wind & Fire, and his frequent collaborator, Charles Stepney. Her 1976 debut album entitled This Is Niecy was released. The single “Free” reached No. 2 on the Black Singles chart, No. 25 on the Billboard Hot 100, and No. 1 on the British Singles chart. The album also featured “Cause You Love Me Baby” (which charted separately on the R&B chart as the flip side of “Free”) and “That’s What Friends Are For”. She also shared a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with pop singer Johnny Mathis in 1978 with the duet “Too Much, Too Little, Too Late”. The duet also topped the Black Singles and Adult Contemporary charts. Williams also topped the dance charts with her disco single “I’ve Got the Next Dance”. Mathis and Williams also recorded the popular theme to the 1980s sitcom Family Ties, “Without Us”. Williams moved on to the American Recording Company (ARC) in the early 1980s where she scored the top ten R&B smash hit “Silly” in 1981. The following year, yet another famed producer, Thom Bell, helped Williams score another number-one R&B chart-topper with her remake of The Royalettes’ “It’s Gonna Take a Miracle”, which became a Top 10 pop hit as well, reaching No. 10.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-21T08:14:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 21 Sep 2018 08:14:00 +0000 31, in American music artists, ballad, black music artists, classic music, coffee, entertainment, female vocalist, music, r&b

 

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Why I No Longer Commute to Work

Originally posted on: AmericaOnCoffee

Janey was always the one. She was. shapely, tall and pretty. She knew it because guys were always swooning her.

As every weekday morning, Janey would pick up five co-workers: Lorna, Lindsey, Amy, Dawn and Carmen in her spacious golden brown Audi. We head to our job at Crimwinkle and Snowden, a very prestigious marketing firm that distributed household supplies. We were all marketing representatives, and our jobs demanded the highest standards in our appearances and attitudes.

This was a good reason why the six of us were so lax and loose behavior on our way to work. We laughed and joked about the silliest of things.

But, at some point there was a guy quite handsome looking staring at Janey. He appeared quite irritated. Janey said “Wow” he was quite cute and took his behavior as a come on. We co-worker/ride sharers didn’t know what to make of it.

The guy beckoned Janey to pull over so he could talk with her.

She did and he gave her a hard punch in the face.

This was a morning of a Ravenous Rage! I may be telling it from a ride-sharer-onseer perspective, but it happened to me, Janey. My friends never commuted to work with me again. And, it was such an embarrassment that I quit my job Crimwinkle and Snowden

©David Dean (AmericaOnCoffee) All rights reserved2018

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-17T11:00:34+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 17 Sep 2018 11:00:34 +0000 31, in morning drama, reflections

 

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“BOB SEGER – OLDTIME ROCK AND ROLL”

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“Old Time Rock and Roll” is a song written by George Jackson and recorded by Bob Seger on his 1978 album Stranger in Town. It was also released as a single in 1979. It is a sentimentalized look back at the music of the original rock ‘n’ roll era. The song gained a huge amount of popularity after being featured in the 1983 film Risky Business. It has since become a standard in popular music and was ranked number two on the Amusement & Music Operators Association’s survey of the Top 40 Jukebox Singles of All Time in 1996.[1] It was also listed as one of the Songs of the Century in 2001 and ranked #100 in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs poll in 2004 of the top songs in American cinema. The song was recorded at the Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Sheffield, Alabama and Sound Suite Studios[2] in Detroit, Michigan.

History

The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, who often backed Seger in his studio recordings, sent Seger a demo of the song during the recording of Stranger in Town.[3] He said in 2006 (and also on the “Stranger in Town” episode of the US radio show In the Studio with Redbeard a few years earlier):

All I kept from the original was: “Old time rock and roll, that kind of music just soothes the soul, I reminisce about the days of old with that old time rock and roll”. I rewrote the verses and I never took credit. That was the dumbest thing I ever did. And Tom Jones (Thomas E. Jones) and George Jackson know it, too. But I just wanted to finish the record [Stranger in Town]. I rewrote every verse you hear except for the choruses. I didn’t ask for credit. My manager said: “You should ask for a third of the credit.” And I said: “Nah. Nobody’s gonna like it.” I’m not credited on it so I couldn’t control the copyright either. Meanwhile it got into a Hardee’s commercial because I couldn’t control it. Oh my God, it was awful!”[4]

However, George Stephenson of Malaco Records claimed:

“Old Time Rock and Roll” is truly [George] Jackson’s song, and he has the tapes to prove it, despite Seger’s claims that he altered it. Bob had pretty much finished his recording at Muscle Shoals and he asked them if they had any other songs he could listen to for the future..”[5]

Originally, the Silver Bullet Band was displeased with its inclusion on Stranger in Town, claiming, according to Seger, that the song was not “Silver Bullety”. However, upon hearing audience reactions to it during their tour in Europe, the band grew to like the song.[6]

In 1990, Seger joined Billy Joel on one occasion and Don Henley on another to play the song during their concerts in Auburn Hills, Michigan.[7] He also performed the song at his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

In popular culture

The song was featured in the 1983 film Risky Business, starring Tom Cruise. Cruise’s character, Joel Goodson, famously lip-syncs and dances in his underwear as this song plays after his parents leave him home alone. The sequence was simulated in the teaser trailer for Garfield: The Movie, the 1984 Alvin and the Chipmunks episode “The Victrola Awards” as performed by Alvin and the Chipmunks, and commercials for Guitar Hero on Tour: Decades, Guitar Hero World Tour, Guitar Hero: Metallica, and more recently Guitar Hero 5 and Band Hero. Activision created a series of television advertisements directed by Brett Ratner based on the scene, each featuring a different set of celebrities lip-sync to the lyrics while using the new instrument controllers. The first ad included athletes Kobe Bryant, Tony Hawk, Alex Rodriguez, and Michael Phelps.[8] Another ad spot featured model Heidi Klum; two versions of Klum’s ad exist, one a “director’s cut” where she is wearing less clothing.[9] A subsequent commercial featuring model Marisa Miller was banned from airing as too racy.[10] Two separate ads featured David Cook, the winner of the seventh season of American Idol, along with fellow finalist David Archuleta.[11]

The song was featured in the TV series ALF, The Nanny, Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, Growing Pains, Scrubs and South Park. Most recently, the song was sung on the episode “Girls (And Boys) On Film” from American TV series Glee, in a mash-up with Kenny Loggins’ song “Danger Zone” from the 1986 film Top Gun, also starring Cruise and The Goldbergs, where Barry Goldberg tries to do the Risky Business dance move that Tom Cruise did in his button up shirt without pants.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-09-17T10:25:42+00:00America/Los_Angeles09bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 17 Sep 2018 10:25:42 +0000 31, in entertainment, male vocalist, music, r&b

 

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