Category Archives: duet

A Taste of honey – “Boogie Oogie Oogie”

A Taste of honey – “Boogie Oogie Oogie”

A Taste of Honey was the name of an American recording act, formed in 1971 by associates Janice-Marie Johnson and Perry Kibble. In 1978, they had one of the best known chart-toppers of the disco era, “Boogie Oogie Oogie”. After their popularity waned during the 1980s, Johnson went on to record as a solo artist and released the album One Taste of Honey which produced numerous minor hits. In 2004, singers Hazel Payne (guitar) and Janice–Marie Johnson (bass) reunited for the first time in over 20 years to perform on the PBS specials Get Down Tonight: The Disco Explosion and My Music: Funky Soul Superstars.



“Mockingbird, Inez & Charlie Foxx “

“Mockingbird, Inez & Charlie Foxx “


Mockingbird, Inez & Charlie Foxx

Inez Foxx (born September 9, 1942) and her elder brother Charlie Foxx (October 23, 1939 – September 18, 1998) were an African-American rhythm and blues and soul duo from Greensboro, North Carolina. Inez sang lead vocal, while Charlie sang back-up and played guitar.


Charlie Foxx began singing with a gospel choir as a child in the early 1950s, and was later joined by his sister Inez. In 1960 Inez traveled to New York City and recorded for Brunswick Records using the name Inez Johnston, but with little success. In early 1963, the pair introduced themselves to Henry ‘Juggy’ Murray, the owner of Sue Records, and sang him their arrangement of the traditional lullaby “Hush, Little Baby”. The song, re-titled


was released in 1963 and made the Top 10 on both the US rhythm and blues and pop charts. It was their most successful record, and was later covered by artists including Aretha Franklin, James Taylor, Carly Simon, Dusty Springfield, Etta James with Taj Mahal and Toby Keith.

The record company, keen to promote Inez Foxx as a solo singer, issued later recordings under her name alone, despite the presence of two voices on the records. Perhaps because “Mockingbird” was seen as a novelty record, the pair had difficulty following it up, although “Ask Me” and “Hurt by Love” made the lower reaches of the US charts, and “Hurt by Love” also reached the UK singles chart. In 1966 the pair joined Musicor Records and recorded for its subsidiary label, Dynamo. They returned to the pop charts in 1967 with “(1-2-3-4-5-6-7) Count the Days”, and became known for their exciting live performances. A highlight was Inez’s rendition of “I Stand Accused”, which finished with a supposedly distraught Inez singing the last verse, while being carried offstage by Charlie. They toured extensively in Europe and their music played a key role in the development of the Northern Soul movement.

Inez Foxx married songwriter and producer Luther Dixon in the late 1960s. Together they wrote, and he produced, the Platters’ mid-1960s return to hit-making with the single “I Love You 1000 Times”..Luther Dixon produced Inez and Charlie’s 1967 Dynamo album Come By Here, but the couple later divorced.

Inez also had some success recording on her own, beginning in 1969, but her popularity faded in the 1970s. Charlie was already working as a songwriter and record producer when they finally disbanded their act. Inez continued to record as a solo singer for Volt Records in the 1970s.

Charlie Foxx died from leukemia in 1998, at the age of 58.


Tags: ,

“Simon & Garfunkel – The Sounds of Silence”

The Sound of Silence“, originally “The Sounds of Silence“, is a song by the American music duo Simon & Garfunkel. The song was written by Paul Simon over a period of several months in 1963 and 1964. A studio audition led to the duo signing a record deal with Columbia Records, and the song was recorded in March 1964 at Columbia Studios in New York City for inclusion on their debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M..

Released in October 1964, the album was a commercial failure and led to the duo breaking apart, with Paul Simon returning to England and Art Garfunkel to his studies at Columbia University. In the spring of 1965, the song began to attract airplay at radio stations in Boston, Massachusetts, and throughout Florida. The growing airplay led Tom Wilson, the song’s producer, to remix the track, overdubbing electric instrumentation. Simon & Garfunkel were not informed of the song’s remix until after its release. The single was released in September 1965.

The song hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending January 1, 1966, leading the duo to reunite and hastily record their second album, which Columbia titled Sounds of Silence in an attempt to capitalize on the song’s success. The song was a top-ten hit in multiple countries worldwide, among them Australia, Austria, West Germany, Japan and the Netherlands. Generally considered a classic folk rock song, the song was added to the National Recording Registry in the Library of Congress for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important” in 2013 along with the rest of the Sounds of Silence album.

Originally titled “The Sounds of Silence” on the album Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., the song was re-titled for later compilations beginning with Simon and Garfunkel’s Greatest Hits.


Posted by on March 16, 2018 in classic music, duet


“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me (Lyrics) – George Michael feat. Elton John”

“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me (Lyrics) – George Michael feat. Elton John”

Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” is a song written by English singer-songwriter Elton John and his lyricist Bernie Taupin. It was released as the first single from Elton John’s 1974 album Caribou; it was released that year during the latter half of May in the United Kingdom, and on 10 June in the United States. The song found further success in 1991 in a version recorded live as a duet between John and George Michael which reached number 1 in the UK and US.

1974 Elton John version

Lyrics and music
In the song, Elton sings to someone he has helped and from whom he is now experiencing rejection:

I took a chance and changed your way of life
but you misread my meaning when I met you
closed the door and left me blinded by the light
don’t let the sun go down on me
although I search myself, it’s always someone else I see.
I’d just allow a fragment of your life to wander free
but losing everything is like the sun going down on me.

It was written with the other songs on the album during a ten-day period in January 1974.

The chorus of the song is supported with a horn arrangement by Del Newman, and features backing vocals of the Beach Boys’ Carl Wilson and Bruce Johnston, and Toni Tennille. Also on the song are percussion accents provided by Ray Cooper and a mellotron played by Dave Hentschel.

“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” charted on 1 June 1974 in Great Britain, making it to number 16 and reached the Top 10 after four weeks. On 10 August, the song’s two-week stay at number 2 ended. In the U.S., it was certified Gold on 6 September 1974 by the RIAA. In Canada, it reached number 1, becoming his fifth chart topper in that country.[1]


Posted by on March 3, 2018 in 1970s, duet, male vocalist, r&b, songwriter


Tags: ,

“SOUL TRAIN Theme Song – By the Sound Of Philadelphia and the Three Degree Vocals” On YouTube


“TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia)” is a 1973 hit recording by MFSB (Mother, Father, Sister, Brother) featuring vocals by

The Three Degrees

. A classic example of the Philadelphia soul genre, it was written by Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff as the theme for the American musical television program

Soul Train,

which specialized in African American musical performers. The single was released on the Philadelphia International label. It was the first television theme song to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100,[1] and it is arguably the first disco song to reach that position.

The song is essentially an instrumental piece, featuring a lush blend of strings and horns in the Philadelphia soul style.

There are only two vocal parts to the song: a passage close to the beginning during which The Three Degrees sing “People all over the world!”; and the chorus over the fadeout, “Let’s get it on/It’s time to get down”. The words “People all over the world!” are not heard in the original version. The version heard on

Soul Train

also had the series title sung over the first four notes of the melody, ”

Soul Train, Soul Train”.

This particular version was released on a 1975 Three Degrees album, International.

TSOP hit number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in the spring of 1974 and remained there for two weeks, the first television theme song to do so in the history of that chart.[1] It also topped the American R&B chart (for one week) and adult contemporary chart (for two weeks).[2] The Three Degrees would revisit the top of the AC chart later in 1974 with their hit single, When Will I See You Again.

Don Cornelius, the creator and host of Soul Train, refused to allow any references to the name of the television series when the single was released, leading Gamble and Huff to adopt the alternate title for the release. Cornelius would later admit that not allowing the single to be named Soul Train was a major mistake on his part.[3]

Although it was rerecorded a number of times for future versions of the show, and various different themes were used during the late 1970s and early 1980s, TSOP returned in the late 1980s and remained the theme song for Soul Train through the disco, 1980s R&B, new jack swing, hip-hop, and neo soul eras of black music.

TSOP was covered by Dexys Midnight Runners and released as a B-side on the 12″ version of the “Jackie Wilson Said” single, later issued on the remastered version of the album Too-Rye-Ay. The band also used it to open some of their live shows.

Another remake of the tune was made in 1978 by reggae band Inner Circle, who had a history of covering American soul songs in the laid-back reggae style of the late 1970s.

Two more covers were made in 1987 (by George Duke), and 1999 (by Sampson); both versions would be used as themes for Soul Train. The 1999 theme would be used until Soul Train ‘s final episode in 2006.

The song is played at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia prior to every Phillies home game. The song was also played after Vancouver Whitecaps NASL home games at Empire Stadium in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and after Vancouver 86ers CSL home games in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Pilipinas, Game KNB?, a Philippines game show hosted by actor/politician Edu Manzano, used an adaptation of TSOP (Tanya) called Papayo Yowza as its theme. The song’s opening was also sampled as program identification for all Philadelphia 76ers games broadcast on WCAU-AM in the mid-to-late 1970s.

In 1998, German act BMR featuring Dutch singer Felicia Uwaje sampled the single in their song Check It Out.



Sam Smith feat with Mary J. Blige “Darling Stay With Me Cause Your All I Need”


“Stay with Me”is a song by English singer and songwriter Sam Smith from his debut studio album In the Lonely Hour (2014). It was released in the United States on 14 April 2014 and in the United Kingdom on 18 May 2014. “Stay with Me” is a gospel-inspired ballad that details the protagonist pleading with his one-night stand not to leave him.[1] The song was written by Smith, James Napier, and William Phillips, with Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne receiving co-writer credits due to the song’s similarity to Petty’s single “I Won’t Back Down”.

The song has become Smith’s most successful single to date, peaking at number one in the UK Singles Chart (becoming his third chart-topper there, second as a solo artist), topping the charts in Canada and New Zealand, and reaching number two on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. It has also reached top 10 status in over twelve countries worldwide. At the 57th Annual Grammy Awards ceremony, Darkchild’s remix version of “Stay with Me” won two Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Song of the Year.[2][3]


In an interview with NME, Sam Smith said that the song was written in a studio in Old Street with James Napier (Jimmy Napes) and William Phillips (also known as “Tourist”).[4] Phillips started playing with three chords on the piano, and Napier quickly provided a drum pattern, and according to Sam Smith, “the song just flowed out of us so naturally,” and the song was written in 30 to 40 minutes. After finishing the song, he started to layer his vocal about 20 times, singing in different parts of the studio and harmonizing. The result sounded like a gospel choir, but all from his own voice, and this demo was then used in the released song.[4][5]

According to Smith, “the song is about the moment in the morning after a one night stand, where the person you are with leaves your house, and you are left by yourself, and it’s just a second, where you are just like: ‘I wish, I wish’. You don’t even love them, you don’t really fancy them that much, it’s just nice to have someone in the bed next to you.”[4] The song won the Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Song of the Year, and in his acceptance speech for winning the Record of the Year, Smith said that “I want to thank the man who this record is about who I fell in love with last year. Thank you so much for breaking my heart because you got me four Grammys.”[6]

On 25 March 2014, the song was played for the first time on Zane Lowe’s BBC Radio 1 show at 7:30pm.[7][8][9] On 29 March, he performed the song live on Saturday Night Live in the United States. On 16 May, he performed the song on The Graham Norton Show. In June, he returned to the United States as part of his tour where he performed the song on Good Morning America, at the Apollo Theater in New York with Mary J. Blige, and David Letterman.



“Endless Love – Diana Ross & Lionel Richie”


Endless Love” is a song written by Lionel Richie and originally recorded as a duet between Richie and fellow soul singer Diana Ross. In this ballad, the singers declare their “endless love” for one another. It was covered by soul singer Luther Vandross with pop singer Mariah Carey and also by country music singer Shania Twain. Richie’s friend (and sometimes co-worker) Kenny Rogers has also recorded the song. Billboard has named the original version as the greatest song duet of all-time.[1]


Tags: , ,

%d bloggers like this: