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Category Archives: doowop

“SUNNY AND THE SUNLINERS TALK TO ME”

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Sunny and the Sunglows(later known as Sunny and the Sunliners)we’re known as an American musical group, formed in 1959, in San Antonio, Texas.

The group’s members were all chicanos with the exception of Amos Johnson Jr., and their style was a blend of rhythm and blues, tejano, blues, and mariachi.They first recorded in 1962 for their own label, Sunglow. Okeh Records picked up their single “Golly Gee” for national distribution that year, and in 1963, Huey P Meaux, a producer from Louisiana and owner of Tear Drop Records, had them record a cover”Talk to Me”version of Little Willie John’s 1958 hit.

The single “Talk to Me”.(b/w “Every Week, Every Month, Every Year”), released on Tear Drop Records (#3014), went to #4 on the Adult Contemporary chart, #12 on the US Black Singles chart, and #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1963. The group followed this release with several further covers – “Rags to Riches” (Tony Bennett) b/w “Not Even Judgment Day”, “Out of Sight-Out of Mind” (The Five Keys) b/w “No One Else Will Do”, and “La Cacahuata” (The Peanuts) b/w “Happy Hippo”.

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“Timber – Vintage 1950’s Doo Wop Pitbull / Ke$ha Cover” 

“Timber – Vintage 1950’s Doo Wop Pitbull / Ke$ha Cover” 

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Our friends The Tee Tones helped us take Pitbull’s “Timber” back in time to the 1950’s, where it would have undoubtedly been played at sock hops across the country. Special thanks to saxophonist David Luther for literally jumping in at the last minute to lend his talents on sax – visit his site here: http://davidluthermusic.com

Postmodern Jukebox: http://www.postmodernjukebox.com 
My Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scottbradleemusic The Tee Tones on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theteetones

The Band:

Robyn Adele Anderson – lead vocals http://www.facebook.com/robynadeleanderson Gerard Giddens – backup vocals Scout Ford – backup vocals Bernard Taylor – backup vocals David Luther – sax (check out his channel: http://www.youtube.com/uncleheavy

Adam Kubota – bass http://www.facebook.com/adamkubotabass Chip Thomas – drums Scott Bradlee – piano http://www.twitter.com/scottbradlee

http://glee.wikia.com/wiki/File:Timber_-_Vintage_1950’s_Doo_Wop_Pitbull_Ke$ha_Cover

Get the mp3 on our album: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/twist-is-the-new-twerk/id808705152 On Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scottbradlee

 
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Posted by on April 19, 2018 in 1950s, doowop, music, retro

 

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Madonna – True Blue

Madonna – True Blue

True Blue” is a song by American singer Madonna. It is the title track from her third studio album True Blue (1986), and was released as the album’s third single on September 17, 1986 by Sire Records. Written and produced by Madonna and Steve Bray, the song deals with the feelings of Madonna for her then-husband Sean Penn. A dance-pop song, it features instrumentation from a rhythm guitar, a synthesizerkeyboards, and drums. The main chorus is backed by an alternate one, incorporating a chord progression generally found in doo-wop music.

Received by the critics as a light-hearted and cute retro song, “True Blue” topped the charts in UK, Ireland and Canada and became another consecutive top ten song in US for Madonna by reaching number three on the Billboard Hot 100. The original music video portrayed her again with a new look, leaner and sporting platinum blond bushy hair. An alternate video was made through the “Make My Video” contest on MTV. The final selected videos had a similar theme of a 1950s-inspired setting and the storyline following the lyrics of the song. “True Blue” has been performed on the Who’s That Girl World Tour (1987) and the Rebel Heart Tour (2015–16).

 
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Posted by on April 17, 2018 in music, doowop, female vocal group, retro

 

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“Johnny Ace – Pledging my love” 


John Marshall Alexander Jr. (June 9, 1929 – December 25, 1954), known by the stage name Johnny Ace, was an American rhythm-and-bluessinger. He had a string of hit singles in the mid-1950s. He died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound at the age of 25.

Alexander was born in Memphis, Tennessee, the son of a preacher, and grew up near LeMoyne-Owen College. After serving in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, he joined Adolph Duncan’s Band as a pianist. He then joined the B. B. King band. Soon King departed for Los Angeles, and the band’s singer, Bobby Bland, joined the army. Alexander took over vocal duties and renamed the band the Beale Streeters. He also took over King’s radio show on WDIA.

He began performing as Johnny Ace. He signed with Duke Records (originally a Memphis label associated with WDIA) in 1952. His first recording, “My Song“, an urbane “heart ballad”, topped the R&B chart for nine weeks in September.[1] (A cover version by Aretha Franklin was released in 1968, on the flip side of “See Saw”.)

Ace began heavy touring, often with Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton. In the next two years, he had eight hits in a row, including “Cross My Heart”, “Please Forgive Me”, “The Clock”, “Yes, Baby”, “Saving My Love for You” and “Never Let Me Go“.[2] In December 1954 he was named the Most Programmed Artist of 1954, according to the results of a national poll of disc jockeys conducted by the U.S. trade weekly Cash Box.[3]

Ace’s recordings sold very well for those times. Early in 1955, Duke Records announced that three of his 1954 recordings, along with Thornton’s “Hound Dog”, had sold more than 1,750,000 copies

After touring for a year, Ace had been performing at the City Auditorium in Houston, Texas, on Christmas Day 1954. During a break between sets, he was playing with a .32-caliber revolver. Members of his band said he did this often, sometimes shooting at roadside signs from their car.

It was widely reported that Ace killed himself playing Russian roulette.[4][5][6] However, Big Mama Thornton‘s bass player, Curtis Tillman, who witnessed the event, said, “I will tell you exactly what happened! Johnny Ace had been drinking and he had this little pistol he was waving around the table and someone said ‘Be careful with that thing…’ and he said ‘It’s okay! Gun’s not loaded… see?’ and pointed it at himself with a smile on his face and ‘Bang!’ — sad, sad thing. Big Mama ran out of the dressing room yelling ‘Johnny Ace just killed himself!'”[7]

Thornton said in a written statement (included in the book The Late Great Johnny Ace) that Ace had been playing with the gun but not playing Russian roulette. According to Thornton, Ace pointed the gun at his girlfriend and another woman who were sitting nearby but did not fire. He then pointed the gun toward himself, bragging that he knew which chamber was loaded. The gun went off, shooting him in the side of the head.

According to his biographer Nick Tosches, Ace shot himself with a .32 pistol, not a .22, and it happened little more than an hour after he had bought a new 1955 Oldsmobile.[8]

Ace’s funeral was held on January 2, 1955, at Clayborn Temple AME church in Memphis. It was attended by an estimated 5,000 people.[9] His remains were buried at New Park Cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee.

Pledging My Love[6] was a posthumous R&B number 1 hit for 10 weeks beginning February 12, 1955. As Billboard bluntly put it, Ace’s death “created one of the biggest demands for a record that has occurred since the death of Hank Williamsjust over two years ago.”[10] His single recordings were compiled and released as The Johnny Ace Memorial Album.


 
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Posted by on April 7, 2018 in ballad, doowop, male vocalist

 

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“Mockingbird, Inez & Charlie Foxx “

“Mockingbird, Inez & Charlie Foxx “

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Mockingbird, Inez & Charlie Foxx

Inez Foxx (born September 9, 1942) and her elder brother Charlie Foxx (October 23, 1939 – September 18, 1998) were an African-American rhythm and blues and soul duo from Greensboro, North Carolina. Inez sang lead vocal, while Charlie sang back-up and played guitar.

Biography

Charlie Foxx began singing with a gospel choir as a child in the early 1950s, and was later joined by his sister Inez. In 1960 Inez traveled to New York City and recorded for Brunswick Records using the name Inez Johnston, but with little success. In early 1963, the pair introduced themselves to Henry ‘Juggy’ Murray, the owner of Sue Records, and sang him their arrangement of the traditional lullaby “Hush, Little Baby”. The song, re-titled

“Mockingbird”,

was released in 1963 and made the Top 10 on both the US rhythm and blues and pop charts. It was their most successful record, and was later covered by artists including Aretha Franklin, James Taylor, Carly Simon, Dusty Springfield, Etta James with Taj Mahal and Toby Keith.

The record company, keen to promote Inez Foxx as a solo singer, issued later recordings under her name alone, despite the presence of two voices on the records. Perhaps because “Mockingbird” was seen as a novelty record, the pair had difficulty following it up, although “Ask Me” and “Hurt by Love” made the lower reaches of the US charts, and “Hurt by Love” also reached the UK singles chart. In 1966 the pair joined Musicor Records and recorded for its subsidiary label, Dynamo. They returned to the pop charts in 1967 with “(1-2-3-4-5-6-7) Count the Days”, and became known for their exciting live performances. A highlight was Inez’s rendition of “I Stand Accused”, which finished with a supposedly distraught Inez singing the last verse, while being carried offstage by Charlie. They toured extensively in Europe and their music played a key role in the development of the Northern Soul movement.

Inez Foxx married songwriter and producer Luther Dixon in the late 1960s. Together they wrote, and he produced, the Platters’ mid-1960s return to hit-making with the single “I Love You 1000 Times”..Luther Dixon produced Inez and Charlie’s 1967 Dynamo album Come By Here, but the couple later divorced.

Inez also had some success recording on her own, beginning in 1969, but her popularity faded in the 1970s. Charlie was already working as a songwriter and record producer when they finally disbanded their act. Inez continued to record as a solo singer for Volt Records in the 1970s.

Charlie Foxx died from leukemia in 1998, at the age of 58.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Burn – Vintage ‘1960s Girl Group Ellie Goulding Cover with Flame-O-Phone”

Image:  http://wearethedaniels.weebly.com


Robyn Adele Anderson (born February 19, 1989) is a multilingual vocalist based in New York City. She is a cast member and featured artist for Postmodern Jukebox with over 145 million YouTube views of her music videos. She is credited with the band’s breakthrough cover of “Thrift Shop” and “We Can’t Stop” in 2013.[1][2][3][4]Anderson also performed lead vocals for performances on Good Morning America (ABC) in 2013,[5] and TEDx in 2014.[6]

Robyn Adele Anderson
Robyn Adele Anderson on stage w Postmodern Jukebox.jpg

Anderson with Postmodern Jukebox in 2014 

 

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Linda Jones – For Your Precious Love:

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LINDA JONES

was born in Newark, New Jersey. She started singing in her family’s gospel group, the Jones Singers at the age of six. Her first recording was “Lonely Teardrops” under the name of Linda Lane on Cub Records in 1963. She was found performing at a local club by songwriter Jerry Harris who introduced her to producer George Kerr. After unsuccessful singles on Atco Records in 1964 and Blue Cat Records the following year, Kerr took her to Warner Bros. Records’ R&B subsidiary, Loma Records in 1967. The first Loma release proved to be her biggest success, the ballad, “Hypnotized” reached #4 on the Billboard R&B chart and #21 on the Hot 100. This proved to be the label’s best-selling record and it was followed by two further hits, including “What’ve I Done (To Make You Mad)” (#8 R&B, #61 pop), and an album.

After Loma closed in late 1968, Linda had a final single on the main Warner label before joining Neptune Records, run by Philadelphia producers, Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Two singles, both produced by Kerr, saw some R&B success before she signed for All Platinum subsidiary, Turbo Records, in New Jersey in 1971. A powerful revamped version of the former Jerry Butler hit, “For Your Precious Love” reached both the R&B (#15) and pop (#74) charts in 1972 and saw her career take off again.

Soon after this at the end of a national tour, she died at her mother’s home at the age of 27 while resting between matinee and evening shows at New York City’s Apollo Theater in Harlem. She had been a diabetic for most of her life and slipped into a coma while sleeping.

All Platinum put out three albums of previously issued and unreleased material after Linda’s death and in 2008, her daughter, Terry Jones, along with Helen Bruner, produced an album featuring her mother’s vocals. One of the tracks, “Baby I Know” was nominated for a Grammy award at the end of 2008.

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