RSS

Category Archives: coffee

“Parliament – Flashlight”

image

Parliament was a funk band most prominent during the 1970s. Both Parliament and its sister act, Funkadelic, were led by George Clinton.

History

Parliament was originally The Parliaments, a doo-wop vocal group based at a Plainfield, New Jersey barbershop. The group was formed in the late 1950s and included George Clinton, Ray Davis, Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, and Grady Thomas. Clinton was the group leader and manager. The group finally had a hit single in 1967 with “(I Wanna) Testify” on Revilot Records. To capitalize, Clinton formed a backing band for a tour, featuring teenage barbershop employee Billy Bass Nelson on bass and his friend Eddie Hazel on guitar, with the lineup eventually rounded out by Tawl Ross on guitar, Tiki Fulwood on drums, and Mickey Atkins on organ.

During a contractual dispute with Revilot, Clinton temporarily lost the rights to the name “The Parliaments”, and signed the ensemble to Westbound Records as Funkadelic, which Clinton positioned as a funk-rock band featuring the five touring musicians with the five Parliaments singers as uncredited guests. With Funkadelic as a recording and touring entity in its own right, in 1970 Clinton relaunched the singing group, now known as Parliament, at first featuring the same ten members. Clinton was now the leader of two different acts, Parliament and Funkadelic, which featured the same members but were marketed as creating two different types of funk.

The Parliament album entitled Osmium was released on Invictus Records in 1970, and was later reissued on CD with non-album tracks as both Rhenium and First Thangs. Osmium featured a mostly psychedelic soul sound that was more similar to the Funkadelic albums of the period than to the later Parliament albums. The song “The Breakdown” was released separately as a single, and reached #30 on the R&B charts in 1971. Due to continuing contractual problems and the fact that Funkadelic releases were more successful at the time, Clinton abandoned the name Parliament until 1974.

Following Osmium, the lineup of Parliament-Funkadelic began going through many changes and was expanded significantly, with the addition of important members such as keyboardist Bernie Worrell in 1970, singer/guitarist Garry Shider in 1971, and bassist Bootsy Collins (recruited from the James Brown backing band) in 1972. Dozens of singers and musicians would contribute to future Parliament-Funkadelic releases. Clinton relaunched Parliament in 1974 and signed the act to Casablanca Records. Parliament, now augmented by the Horny Horns (also recruited from James Brown’s band) was positioned as a smoother R&B-based funk ensemble with intricate horn and vocal arrangements, and as a counterpoint to the guitar-based funk-rock of Funkadelic. By this point, Parliament and Funkadelic were touring as a combined entity known as Parliament-Funkadelic or simply P-Funk (which also became the catch-all term for George Clinton’s rapidly growing stable of funk artists).

The album Up for the Down Stroke was released in 1974, with Chocolate City following in 1975. Both performed strongly on the Billboard R&B charts and were moderately successful on the Pop charts. Parliament began its period of greatest mainstream success with the concept album Mothership Connection (1975), the lyrics of which launched much of the P-Funk mythology. The subsequent albums The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein (1976), Funkentelechy vs. the Placebo Syndrome (1977), and Motor Booty Affair (1978) all reached high on both the R&B and Pop charts, while Funkadelic was also experiencing significant mainstream success. Parliament scored the #1 R&B singles “Flash Light” in 1977 and “Aqua Boogie” in 1978.

The rapidly expanding ensemble of musicians and singers in the Parliament-Funkadelic enterprise, as well as Clinton’s problematic management practices, began to take their toll by the late 1970s. Original Parliaments members Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, and Grady Thomas, who had been with Clinton since the barbershop days in the late 1950s, felt marginalized by the continuous influx of new members and departed acrimoniously in 1977. Other important group members like singer/guitarist Glenn Goins and drummer Jerome Brailey left Parliament-Funkadelic in the late 1970s after disputes over Clinton’s management. Two further Parliament albums, Gloryhallastoopid (1979) and Trombipulation (1980) were less successful than the albums from the group’s prime 1975-1978 period.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

Kopi Luwak is the World’s Most Expensive Coffee. Here Are Some Facts:

Kopi Luwak is the World’s Most Expensive Coffee. Here Are Some Facts:

All About Kopi Luwak – The Most Expensive Coffee In The World!

Kopi luwak is the world’s most expensive coffee. The main factor of it’s high price is the uncommon method of producing such a coffee. It has been produced from the coffee beans which have been digested by a certain Indonesian cat-like animal called then palm civet or also civet cat. This is the reason kopi luwak is also called cat poop coffee or civet cat coffee. The feces of this cat will be collected, finished and sold as kopi luwak. On this website you will find all relevant information about the production process, the cat, certified kopi luwak producers, the kopi luwak coffee itself and it’s unique properties and taste. The short supply, in comparison with the high demand, the different taste and the uncommon production methods define the value of kopi luwak – the most expensive coffee in the world.

Here is a price comparison of a kopi luwak coffee with an average coffee brand:

Kopi Luwak Price - the most expensive coffee
kopi luwak
(most expensive coffee)
Average Coffee Price - the most expensive coffee
Average coffee
average price of a coffee mug or coffee cup - the most expensive coffee $35 to $100
(price per cup of coffee ordered
in a regular coffee shop)
$2 to $5
(price per cup of coffee ordered
in a regular coffee shop)
Coffee price of 1 pund average coffee - the most expensive coffee in the world $100 to $600
(price per pound or ~500g)
$3 to $10
(price per pound or ~500g)
average world coffee production - the most expensive coffee 500 to 1000 pounds
= ~250kg to 500kg
(kopi luwak production per year)
1.8 mio. tons
of Brazil’s green coffee
= ~900 mio tons kg
(coffee production per year)

Why is Kopi Luwak so special and the most expensive coffee?


The most important reason of the coffee’s speciality is the production process. Have a look at the pictures below to see how the most expensive coffee is produced: from beans fallen from a coffee tree to a cup of Kopi Luwak coffee. If you want more details about each step, just click on “more..” in each section. Hint: To enjoy Kopi Luwak, use regular sized coffee mugs.

https://goo.gl/images/NhnYfS

get full info from article

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 04/10 in coffee

 

Tags: , ,

“The Hollies – He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother”

image

He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother” is a popular music ballad written by Bobby Scott and Bob Russell. Originally recorded by Kelly Gordon in 1969, the song became a worldwide hit for The Hollies later that year and again for Neil Diamond in 1970. It has been covered by many artists in subsequent years. The Hollies’ and Rufus Wainwright’s versions of the song were featured in the film Zoolander.

Origin of the song

Scott and Russell had been introduced to each other by Johnny Mercer, at a California nightclub. Although Russell was dying of lymphoma and the pair met in person only three times, they managed to collaborate on the song.

Origin of the title

In 1884, James Wells, Moderator of the United Free Church of Scotland, in his book The Parables of Jesus tells the story of a little girl carrying a big baby boy. Seeing her struggling, someone asked if she wasn’t tired. With surprise she replied, “No, he’s not heavy; he’s my brother.”[3]

In a 1918 publication by Ralph Waldo Trine titled The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit, he relates the following anecdote: “Do you know that incident in connection with the little Scottish girl? She was trudging along, carrying as best she could a boy younger, but it seemed almost as big as she herself, when one remarked to her how heavy he must be for her to carry, when instantly came the reply: ‘He’s na heavy. He’s mi brither.'”[4]

The first editor of Kiwanis magazine, Roe Fulkerson, published a column in September 1924 carrying the title “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother”, the first use of the phrase exactly as it is rendered in the song title.

In the 1940s, the words, adapted as “He ain’t heavy, Father, he’s my brother”, were taken as a slogan for Boys Town children’s home by founder Father Edward Flanagan.[5]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

image

 

Tags: ,

“Werewolves Of London”

wp-1474288333192.jpeg

“Werewolves of London” is a rock song composed by LeRoy Marinell, Waddy Wachtel, and Warren Zevon and performed by Zevon. Included on Zevon’s 1978 album Excitable Boy, it featured accompaniment by drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie of Fleetwood Mac. The single was released by Asylum Records as catalog number 45472. It entered the American Top 40 charts on April 22, 1978, reaching number 21, and remained in the Top 40 for six weeks.

According to Wachtel, “Werewolves of London” was “the hardest song to get down in the studio I’ve ever worked on.”[1] However, Wachtel “laid down his solo in one take, before he’d even had a chance to partake of the bump of coke and drink he’d placed in front of him.”[2] According to Jackson Browne (who was the producer for the recording), “Werewolves of London” along with “Excitable Boy” were written while work was being done on the album that preceded Excitable Boy but were not included on that album in favor of other songs.[3] The song is in the key of G major, with a three-chord progression that runs throughout.[4]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

“The Beatles: Yesterday”

image

Yesterday

” is a song by English rock band

the Beatles

written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) first released on the album Help! in the United Kingdom in August 1965.

Yesterday

“, with the B-side “Act Naturally”, was released as a single in the United States in September 1965. While it topped the American chart in October the song also hit the British top 10 in a cover version by Matt Monro. The song also appeared on the UK EP “Yesterday” in March 1966 and the Beatles’ US album Yesterday and Today released in June 1966.

McCartney’s vocal and acoustic guitar, together with a string quartet, essentially made for the first solo performance of the band. It remains popular today with more than 2,200 cover versions[3] and is one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music.[note 1]”Yesterday” was voted the best song of the 20th century in a 1999 BBC Radio 2 poll of music experts and listeners and was also voted the No. 1 pop song of all time by MTV and Rolling Stone magazine the following year. In 1997, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone.

Yesterday

” is a melancholy ballad about the break-up of a relationship. McCartney is the only member of

the Beatles

to appear on the recording. The final recording was so different from other works by the Beatles that the band members vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom. However, it was issued as a single in the US in September 1965 and later released as a single in the UK in 1976.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

“Queen – Bohemian Rhapsody (Official Video)”

“Queen – Bohemian Rhapsody (Official Video)”

image

“Bohemian Rhapsody” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was written by Freddie Mercury for the band’s 1975 studio album A Night at the Opera. It is a six-minute suite,[6] consisting of several sections without a chorus: an intro, a ballad segment, an operatic passage, a hard rock part and a reflective coda.[7] The song is a more accessible take on the 1970s progressive rock genre.[1] It was the most expensive single ever made at the time of its release.[8]
When it was released as a single, “Bohemian Rhapsody” became a commercial success, staying at the top of the UK Singles Chart for nine weeks and selling more than a million copies by the end of January 1976.[9] It reached number one again in 1991 for another five weeks when the same version was re-released,[10] eventually becoming the UK’s third best-selling single of all time.[11] It topped the charts in several other markets as well, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and The Netherlands, later becoming one of the best-selling singles of all time. In the United States the song originally peaked at number nine in 1976. It returned to the chart at number two in 1992 following its appearance in the film Wayne’s World, which revived its American popularity.

Although critical reaction was initially mixed, “Bohemian Rhapsody” remains one of Queen’s most popular songs and is frequently placed on modern lists of the greatest songs of all time. The single was accompanied by a promotional video, which many scholars consider ground-breaking.[12] In 2004, “Bohemian Rhapsody” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[13] In 2012, the song topped the list on an ITV nationwide poll in the UK to find “The Nation’s Favourite Number One” over 60 years of music.[14]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags: ,

“American Woman The Guess Who”

image

“American Woman” is a song by Canadian rock band The Guess Who, first released in January 1970 on the album of the same name and later in March as a single,[1] which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.[6] Backed with “No Sugar Tonight,” Billboard ranked it as the No. 3 record of 1970.[7]

The song has been covered by many rock artists, including Lenny Kravitz and Krokus. The song was included in Guitar Hero World Tour and Rock Band 2.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: