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“Cafetière italienne Mukka Express Bialetti” 

 

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“Blood, Sweat & Tears – Spinning Wheel (album version)”

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“Spinning Wheel” is the title of a popular song from 1969 by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. The song was written by the band’s Canadian lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas and appears on their self-titled album.

Released as a single in 1969, “Spinning Wheel” peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in July of that year, remaining in the runner-up position for three weeks.[1] In August of that year, the song topped the Billboard easy listening chart for two weeks.[2] It was also a crossover hit, reaching #45 on the US R&B chart.

“Spinning Wheel” was nominated for three Grammy Awards at the 1970 ceremony, winning in the category Best Instrumental Arrangement. The arranger for the song was the band’s saxophonist, Fred Lipsius. It was nominated for Record of the Year and Song of the Year; the album won the Grammy for Album of the Year.

Clayton-Thomas was quoted as describing the song as being “written in an age when psychedelic imagery was all over lyrics…it was my way of saying, ‘Don’t get too caught up, because everything comes full circle’.”[2]

The song ends with the 1815 Austrian tune “O Du Lieber Augustin” (“The More We Get Together” or “Did You Ever See a Lassie?”)[citation needed] and drummer Bobby Colomby’s comment: “That wasn’t too good”, followed by laughter from the rest of the group. According to producer James William Guercio this section was added in at the last minute after the end of the master tape was recorded over accidentally by an engineer at the studio. Most of this section and the trumpet solo were edited out for the single version. The eight-bar piano solo which precedes the trumpet solo on the album version is overlapped with guitar on the single version before the last verse.

Among artists who have covered “Spinning Wheel” are Shirley Bassey, who included the song on her 1970 album Something, and Nancy Wilson, who covered it in the Hawaii Five-O episode “Trouble in Mind,” which originally aired September 23, 1970. In 1970 Marianne Mendt released a version of the tune in Austria, as “A g’scheckert’s Hutschpferd” and Barbara Eden performed a live version [3] that aired in the U.S. Jazz organist Dr. Lonnie Smith recorded an extended instrumental version for his 1970 Blue Note album Drives.[4] James Brown scored a minor hit in 1971 with an instrumental version of the song, reaching #90 on the Billboard Hot 100.[5][6] The Canadian a cappella music group, Cadence also covered this song. In 1970 P.P. Arnold recorded a version produced by Barry Gibb but it was not released. An instrumental rendition of this song was used as a cue on the first Wheel of Fortune pilot titled Shopper’s Bazaar.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Coffee prepared at 20,000 ft. in a balloon?”(record bid)

image credit:  Robert Romanowicz 

A team from Lithuania have set a new world record by preparing a cup of coffee in a air balloon flying at more than 20,000 feet (6.3km) high.

Nidas Kiuberis, Grazvydas Vilcinskas and Vytautas Samarinas had to don protective clothing and oxygen masks before reaching the impressive height.

Once there – with a temperature of around -20C – they used a special Aeropress coffee maker to push hot water through the filter and produce a quality cup of coffee.

Coffee expert Kiuberis then took off his oxygen mask and quickly tasted it before putting the mask back on. He said the brew was “as tasty as on earth” not better “as tasty” — so worth flying to 20,000ft then?

Speaking of the flight Kiuberis, co-owner of coffeehouse chain Coffee Inn, said: “Such coffee record would not have been possible without professional help. 

“We were being prepared for it weeks before: from experimental flights, special diets to oxygen therapy lasting several hours before the final flight.

“I must admit even if I knew that we are fully prepared, all the time during the flight I was really excited. Still, it is the first and the only time I was making and drinking coffee flying at 60 km/h speed at inhuman height.”

http://newslite.com

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2017 in coffee, entertainment

 

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 “Coffee and spices” 


 
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Posted by on April 21, 2017 in coffee

 

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“Thompson Twins – Hold Me Now (Lyrics) [HQ]”

Thompson Twins were a British music group that formed in April 1977[3] and disbanded in May 1993. Initially a new wave group, they switched to a more mainstream pop sound and achieved considerable popularity in the mid-1980s, scoring a string of hits in the United Kingdom, the United States, and around the globe. 
The band was named after the two bumbling detectives Thomson and Thompson in Hergé’s comic strip The Adventures of Tintin.[4] At various stages, the band had up to seven members though their best known incarnation was as a trio between 1982–86. They became a prominent act in the Second British Invasion, and in 1985, the band performed at Live Aid where they were joined onstage by Madonna.[4]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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Coffee Fellowship And Hospitality … All Drinks Are Welcome!

Coffee Fellowship And Hospitality … All Drinks Are Welcome!

image: clipartkid.com

image:  jennycancook.com

 
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Posted by on April 17, 2017 in brunch, coffee, entertainment

 

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“The History of Coffee”

“The History of Coffee”

featured image: http://www.rijo42.co.uk


No one knows exactly how or when coffee was discovered, though there are many legends about its origin.

An Ethiopian Legend

GoatsCoffee grown worldwide can trace its heritage back centuries to the ancient coffee forests on the Ethiopian plateau. There, legend says the goat herder Kaldi first discovered the potential of these beloved beans. 

The story goes that that Kaldi discovered coffee after he noticed that after eating the berries from a certain tree, his goats became so energetic that they did not want to sleep at night. 

Kaldi reported his findings to the abbot of the local monastery, who made a drink with the berries and found that it kept him alert through the long hours of evening prayer. The abbot shared his discovery with the other monks at the monastery, and knowledge of the energizing berries began to spread.

As word moved east and coffee reached the Arabian peninsula, it began a journey which would bring these beans across the globe.

The Arabian Peninsula

Coffee cultivation and trade began on the Arabian Peninsula.  By the 15th century, coffee was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia and by the 16th century it was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria, and Turkey.

Coffee was not only enjoyed in homes, but also in the many public coffee houses — called qahveh khaneh — which began to appear in cities across the Near East. The popularity of the coffee houses was unequaled and people frequented them for all kinds of social activity. 

Not only did the patrons drink coffee and engage in conversation, but they also listened to music, watched performers, played chess and kept current on the news.  Coffee houses quickly became such an important center for the exchange of information that they were often referred to as “Schools of the Wise.”

With thousands of pilgrims visiting the holy city of Mecca each year from all over the world, knowledge of this “wine of Araby” began to spread. 

Coffee Comes to Europe

European travelers to the Near East brought back stories of an unusual dark black beverage. By the 17th century, coffee had made its way to Europe and was becoming popular across the continent. 

Some people reacted to this new beverage with suspicion or fear, calling it the “bitter invention of Satan.” The local clergy condemned coffee when it came to Venice in 1615. The controversy was so great that Pope Clement VIII was asked to intervene. He decided to taste the beverage for himself before making a decision, and found the drink so satisfying that he gave it papal approval.

Despite such controversy, coffee houses were quickly becoming centers of social activity and communication in the major cities of England, Austria, France, Germany and Holland. In England “penny universities” sprang up, so called because for the price of a penny one could purchase a cup of coffee and engage in stimulating conversation.  

Coffee began to replace the common breakfast drink beverages of the time — beer and wine. Those who drank coffee instead of alcohol began the day alert and energized, and not surprisingly, the quality of their work was greatly improved. (We like to think of this a precursor to the modern office coffee service.)

By the mid-17th century, there were over 300 coffee houses in London, many of which attracted like-minded patrons, including merchants, shippers, brokers and artists.

Many businesses grew out of these specialized coffee houses. Lloyd’s of London, for example, came into existence at the Edward Lloyd’s Coffee House.

The New World

In the mid-1600’s, coffee was brought to New Amsterdam, later called New York by the British.

Though coffee houses rapidly began to appear, tea continued to be the favored drink in the New World until 1773, when the colonists revolted against a heavy tax on tea imposed by King George III. The revolt, known as the Boston Tea Party, would forever change the American drinking preference to coffee. 

“Coffee – the favorite drink of the civilized world.” – Thomas Jefferson

Plantations Around the World

As demand for the beverage continued to spread, there was fierce competition to cultivate coffee outside of Arabia. 

The Dutch finally got seedlings in the latter half of the 17th century. Their first attempts to plant them in India failed, but they were successful with their efforts in Batavia, on the island of Java in what is now Indonesia.  

The plants thrived and soon the Dutch had a productive and growing trade in coffee. They then expanded the cultivation of coffee trees to the islands of Sumatra and Celebes.

Coming to the Americas

In 1714, the Mayor of Amsterdam presented a gift of a young coffee plant to King Louis XIV of France. The King ordered it to be planted in the Royal Botanical Garden in Paris. In 1723, a young naval officer, Gabriel de Clieu obtained a seedling from the King’s plant. Despite a challenging voyage — complete with horrendous weather, a saboteur who tried to destroy the seedling, and a pirate attack — he managed to transport it safely to Martinique.  

Once planted, the seedling not only thrived, but it’s credited with the spread of over 18 million coffee trees on the island of Martinique in the next 50 years. Even more incredible is that this seedling was the parent of all coffee trees throughout the Caribbean, South and Central America.

The famed Brazilian coffee owes its existence to Francisco de Mello Palheta, who was sent by the emperor to French Guiana to get coffee seedlings. The French were not willing to share, but the French Governor’s wife, captivated by his good looks, gave him a large bouquet of flowers before he left— buried inside were enough coffee seeds to begin what is today a billion-dollar industry.

Missionaries and travelers, traders and colonists continued to carry coffee seeds to new lands, and coffee trees were planted worldwide. Plantations were established in magnificent tropical forests and on rugged mountain highlands. Some crops flourished, while others were short-lived. New nations were established on coffee economies. Fortunes were made and lost. By the end of the 18th century, coffee had become one of the world’s most profitable export crops. After crude oil, coffee is the most sought commodity in the world.


 

http://www.ncausa.org/About-Coffee/History-of-Coffee

 “Ethiopia ― The Birthplace of Coffee Arabica”   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBmPIpvkeek&feature=youtube_gdata_player  

 
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Posted by on April 17, 2017 in coffee

 

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