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Category Archives: classic music

Walk Like A Man – The Four Seasons

The Four Seasons were at one point more popular than the Beatles and began their run in the 1960’s and 70’s, and their hit song Walk Like A Man kind of proved it. Before taking the name that would get them known and ultimately seal their fame they were known as The Four Lovers, a name that many people today probably don’t know about. The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990 and their sound has been appearing ever since on TV shows, movies, and even in video games. They’re sound is one that a person really has to get into but is otherwise quite nice. They’ve gone through their fair share of members through the years and are still performing today..

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-20T10:00:46+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 20 Oct 2018 10:00:46 +0000 31, in classic music, pop music

 

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“Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom (Central Park 1980)”

“Elton John – Philadelphia Freedom (Central Park 1980)”

“Philadelphia Freedom” is a song released by The Elton John Band as a single in 1975. The song was one of Elton John’s seven #1 US hits during the early and mid-1970s, which saw his recordings dominating the charts. In Canada, it was his eighth single to hit the top of the RPM national singles chart.

The song was written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin as a favour to John’s friend, tennis star Billie Jean King. King was part of the Philadelphia Freedoms professional tennis team. The song features an orchestral arrangement by Gene Page, including flutes, horns, and strings.

The song made its album debut on 1977’s Elton John’s Greatest Hits Volume II. The Unedited version (without an early fade out) appears only on the box set To Be Continued…. and the remaster for Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-20T09:42:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 20 Oct 2018 09:42:00 +0000 31, in classic music, entertainment, music, r&b, reflections, rocknroll

 

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“America – Tin Man (w/ lyrics)”

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Tin Man” is a 1974 song by the pop rock band America. It was written by band member Dewey Bunnell and produced by George Martin, who also plays the piano part on the recorded version. The song was included on the band’s album Holiday, also from 1974.

Background

The song’s title and some of its lyrics refer to the Tin Woodman from The Wizard of Oz.[3] Songwriter Bunnell was quoted describing the parallel: “My favorite movie, I guess. I always loved it as a kid. Very obscure lyrics. Great grammar – ‘Oz never did give nothing to the Tin Man.’ It’s sort of a poetic license.”[3]

Dan Peek – who describes “Tin Man” as “quintessential Dewey, easy stream of consciousness with a major seventh acoustic bed” – states that Bunnell “actually begged us not to record the song. Knowing Dewey it was probably reverse psychology; if it was, Gerry and I fell for it, insisting it was perfect for the album.”[4]

Released as the first single from Holiday, “Tin Man” became the band’s fourth top-ten hit in the US, spending three weeks at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1974.[5] The song reached number one on the Billboard easy listening chart in October of that year.[3] In the UK, the song was relegated to the B-side of another album track, “Mad Dog”, released in July, but both sides failed to chart.

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Posted by on SatAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-20T09:05:14+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesSat, 20 Oct 2018 09:05:14 +0000 31, in coffee, music, classic music, entertainment, American music artists, r&b, folk music, male vocalist, songwriter

 

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“Saturday Night Fever – John Travolta – Bee Gees”

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Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 American drama film directed by John Badham and starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a working-class young man who spends his weekends dancing and drinking at a local Brooklyn discothèque; Karen Lynn Gorney as Stephanie Mangano, his dance partner and eventual confidante; and Donna Pescow as Annette, Tony’s former dance partner and would-be girlfriend. While in the disco, Tony is the king. His circle of friends and weekend dancing help him to cope with the harsh realities of his life: a dead-end job, clashes with his unsupportive and squabbling parents, racial tensions in the local community, and his general restlessness.

A huge commercial success, the film significantly helped to popularize disco music around the world and made Travolta, already well known from his role on TV’s Welcome Back, Kotter, a household name. The Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, featuring disco songs by the Bee Gees, is one of the best-selling soundtracks of all time.[4]

The film showcased aspects of the music, the dancing, and the subculture surrounding the disco era: symphony-orchestrated melodies; haute couture styles of clothing; pre-AIDS sexual promiscuity; and graceful choreography.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-19T10:30:46+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 19 Oct 2018 10:30:46 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music

 

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“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

In 1962, while playing a gig at the Pypo Club in Seaside, Oregon, then managed by Al Dardis, the band noticed Rockin’ Robin Roberts’s version of

“Louie Louie”

being played on the jukebox for hours on end. The entire club would get up and dance.Ely convinced the Kingsmen to learn the song, which they played at dances to a great crowd response. Unknown to him, he changed the beat because he misheard it on a jukebox. Ken Chase, host of radio station KISN, formed his own club to capitalize on these dance crazes. Dubbed the “Chase”, the Kingsmen became the club’s house band and Ken Chase became the band’s manager. On April 5, 1963, Chase booked the band an hour-long session at the local Northwestern Inc. studio for the following day. The band had just played a 90-minute

“Louie Louie”

marathon.

Despite the band’s annoyance at having so little time to prepare, on April 6 at 10 am the Kingsmen walked into the three-microphone recording studio. In order to sound like a live performance, Ely was forced to lean back and sing to a microphone suspended from the ceiling. “It was more yelling than singing,” Ely said, “’cause I was trying to be heard over all the instruments.” In addition, he was wearing braces at the time of the performance, further compounding his infamously slurred words. Ely sang the beginning of the third verse several bars too early, but realized his mistake and waited for the rest of the band to catch up. In what was thought to be a warm-up, the song was recorded in its first and only take. The Kingsmen were not proud of the version, but their manager liked the rawness of their cover. The B-side was “Haunted Castle”, composed by Ely and Don Gallucci, the new keyboardist. However, Lynn Easton was credited on both the Jerden and Wand releases. The entire session cost $50, and the band split the cost.

“Louie Louie” was kept from the top spot on the charts in late 1963 and early 1964 by the Singing Nun and Bobby Vinton, who monopolized the No.1 slot for four weeks apiece. The Kingsmen single reached No. 1 on the Cashbox chart and No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Additionally in the UK it reached No. 26 on the Record Retailer chart. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

The band attracted nationwide attention when “Louie Louie” was banned by the governor of Indiana, Matthew E. Welsh, also attracting the attention of the FBI because of alleged indecent lyrics in their version of the song. The lyrics were, in fact, innocent, but Ely’s baffling enunciation permitted teenage fans and concerned parents alike to imagine the most scandalous obscenities. All of this attention only made the song more popular. In April 1966 “Louie Louie” was reissued and once again hit the music charts, reaching No. 65 on the Cashbox chart and No. 97 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-15T09:32:51+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 15 Oct 2018 09:32:51 +0000 31, in American music artists, classic music, entertainment, male vocal group, r&b

 

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“Arthur Conley-Sweet Soul Music”

“Arthur Conley-Sweet Soul Music”

In 1964, he moved to a new label (Baltimore’s Ru-Jac Records) and released “I’m a Lonely Stranger”. When Otis Redding heard this, he asked Conley to record a new version, which was released on Redding’s own fledgling label Jotis Records, as only its second release.[2] Conley met Redding in 1967. Together they rewrote the Sam Cooke song “Yeah Man” into “Sweet Soul Music”, which, at Redding’s insistence, was released on the Atco-distributed label Fame Records, and was recorded at FAME studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. It proved to be a massive hit, going to the number two position on the U.S. charts and the Top Ten across much of Europe. “Sweet Soul Music” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[3]

After several years of hits singles in the early 1970s, he relocated to England in 1975, and spent several years in Belgium, settling in Amsterdam (Netherlands) in spring 1977. At the beginning of 1980 he had some major performances as Lee Roberts and the Sweaters in the Ganzenhoef, Paradiso, De Melkweg and the Concertgebouw, and was highly successful. At the end of 1980 he moved to the Dutch town of Ruurlo legally changing his name to Lee Roberts—his middle name and his mother’s maiden name. He promoted new music via his Art-Con Productions company. Amongst the bands he promoted was the heavy metal band Shockwave from The Hague. A live performance on January 8, 1980, featuring Lee Roberts & the Sweaters, was released as an album entitled Soulin’ in 1988.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-15T09:13:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 15 Oct 2018 09:13:00 +0000 31, in 1970s, black music artists, classic music, male vocalist, r&b, soul oldies

 

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“The Rascals – It’s A Beautiful Morning”

“The Rascals – It’s A Beautiful Morning”

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“A Beautiful Morning” is a song written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and recorded by The Rascals. Coming out in early 1968, it was the group’s first single released under that name rather than The Young Rascals. The first album on which the song appeared was Time Peace: The Rascals’ Greatest Hits. It continued the theme of carefree optimism that had distinguished the previous year’s “Groovin'”. The song was a big hit in the United States, reaching number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also reaching number 36 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart.[1] It was RIAA-certified as a Million Seller on June 28, 1968. The song had an introductory sound of mystical wind chimes and bells.

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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-10-14T08:30:50+00:00America/Los_Angeles10bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 14 Oct 2018 08:30:50 +0000 31, in American music artists, classic music, male vocal group, pop music, r&b, r&b history

 

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