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Category Archives: classic music

“Tango? Not Just A Dance, Find out the History …”

 
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Posted by on August 16, 2017 in classic music, FRENCH FRIDAYS

 

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“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

I Got a Woman” (originally titled “I’ve Got a Woman“) is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray CharlesAtlantic Records released the song as a single in December 1954, with “Come Back Baby” as the B-side. Both songs later appeared on the 1957 album Ray Charles(subsequently reissued as Hallelujah I Love Her So).


The song was recorded in late 1954 in the Atlanta studios of Georgia Tech radio station WGST. It was a hit—Charles’ first—climbing quickly to #1 R&B in January 1955.[3] Charles told the Pop Chronicles that he performed this song for about a year before he recorded it on November 18, 1954.[4]The song would lead to more hits for Charles during this period when he was with Atlantic. It was later ranked No. 239 on Rolling Stones list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, one of Charles’ five songs on the list.[5] A re-recorded version by Ray Charles, entitled “I Gotta Woman” (ABC-Paramount10649) reached No. 79 on the Billboardpop chart in 1965.[6]

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2017 in 1950s, 1960s, blues, classic music, music

 

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“Maria Muldaur – Midnight At The Oasis

“Maria Muldaur – Midnight At The Oasis


Maria Muldaur (born September 12, 1943) is an American folk-blues singer who was part of the American folk music revival in the early 1960s. She recorded the 1974 hit song “Midnight at the Oasis”, and continues to record albums in the folk

“Midnight at the Oasis” is a 1973 song written by David Nichtern. It was recorded by the singer Maria Muldaur for her self-titled album and is her best-known recording, peaking at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the spring of 1974. Billboard ranked it as the No. 13 song for 1974. It was also nominated for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year at the 17th Annual Grammy Awards, held in 1975.

The song is a saucy, teasing offer of a desert love affair, in a fantasy setting that owes more to Rudolph Valentino sheik movies than to real Middle Eastern deserts. Allmusic reviewer Matthew Greenwald describes the song as “so sensual and evocative that it was probably one of the most replayed records of the era and also may be responsible for the most pregnancies from a record during the mid-’70s”. Some of the lyrics are doubtlessly suggestive (e.g., “let’s slip off to a sand dune … and kick up a little dust”; “you won’t need no camel … when I take you for a ride”; “Cactus is our friend. He’ll point out the way.”) But the tone is playful throughout. “Midnight” features a 1970s-defining instrumental bridge, particularly memorable for the guitar work of Amos Garrett.

 
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Posted by on August 11, 2017 in classic music

 

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“Eric Clapton Layla Original”

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Eric Clapton Layla Original:

Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born 30 March 1945), is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time.[1] Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”[2] and fourth in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”.[3] He was also named number five in Time magazine’s list of “The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players” in 2009 [4]

In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately after leaving Mayall, Clapton joined Cream, a power trio with drummer Ginger Baker and bassist Jack Bruce in which Clapton played sustained blues improvisations and “arty, blues-based psychedelic pop”.[5] For most of the 1970s, Clapton’s output bore the influence of the mellow style of JJ Cale and the reggae of Bob Marley. His version of Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff” helped reggae reach a mass market.[6] Two of his most popular recordings were “Layla”, recorded while he was a member of band Derek and the Dominos; and Robert Johnson’s “Crossroads”, recorded by band Cream. Following the death of his son Conor in 1991, Clapton’s grief was expressed in the song “Tears in Heaven”, which featured in his Unplugged album.

Clapton has been the recipient of 18 Grammy Awards, and the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. In 2004, he was awarded a CBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music.[7][8][9] In 1998, Clapton, a recovering alcoholic and drug addict, founded the Crossroads Centre on Antigua, a medical facility for recovering substance abusers.[10]

en.m.wikipedia,org

 
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Posted by on August 11, 2017 in 1970s, classic music, male vocalist, r&b

 

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“Al Green-Lets Stay Together”

“Al Green-Lets Stay Together”


Early Career

Having noted that Al had been trying to sing like Jackie Wilson, Sam Cooke, Wilson Pickett and James Brown, Mitchell became his vocal mentor, coaching him into finding his own voice. Before releasing his first album with Hi, Green removed the final “e” from his name. Subsequently, Green released Green Is Blues, which became a moderate success. Green’s follow-up album, Al Green Gets Next to You, featured Green’s hit R&B cover of The Temptations’ “I Can’t Get Next to You”, recorded in a slow blues-oriented version. The album also featured his first significant hit, “Tired of Being Alone”, which sold half a million copies and was certified gold, becoming the first of seven consecutive gold singles Green would record in the next couple of years.

Green’s next album, Let’s Stay Together, solidified his place in soul music with the title track becoming his biggest hit to date, reaching number one on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts. The album became his first to be certified gold. His follow-up, I’m Still in Love with You went platinum with the help of the singles, “Look What You Done for Me” and the title track, both of which went top ten on the Hot 100. His next album, 1973’s Call Me spawned three top ten singles including “You Ought to Be with Me”, “Call Me (Come Back Home)” and “Here I Am (Come and Take Me)”. Green’s album, Livin’ for You, released at the tail-end of 1973, became his last album to be certified gold.

In addition to these hit singles, Green also had radio hits with songs such as “Love and Happiness”, his cover of the Bee Gees’ “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart”, “Simply Beautiful”, “What a Wonderful Thing Love Is” and “Take Me to the River”, later covered successfully by new wave band Talking Heads and blues artist Syl Johnson. Green continued to record successful R&B hits in the next several years including “Livin’ for You”, “Let’s Get Married”, “Sha-La-La (Makes Me Happy)”, “L-O-V-E (Love)” and “Full of Fire”. By the time Green released the album, The Belle Album in 1977, however, Green’s record sales had plummeted, partially due to Green’s own personal issues during this time and his desire to become a minister.[8] His last Hi Records album, Truth n’ Time, was released in 1978 and failed to become a success. Two years later, he left Hi for Myrrh Records and recorded only gospel music for the next decade and a half.

 

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“Burn – Vintage ‘1960s Girl Group Ellie Goulding Cover with Flame-O-Phone”

Image:  http://wearethedaniels.weebly.com


Robyn Adele Anderson (born February 19, 1989) is a multilingual vocalist based in New York City. She is a cast member and featured artist for Postmodern Jukebox with over 145 million YouTube views of her music videos. She is credited with the band’s breakthrough cover of “Thrift Shop” and “We Can’t Stop” in 2013.[1][2][3][4]Anderson also performed lead vocals for performances on Good Morning America (ABC) in 2013,[5] and TEDx in 2014.[6]

Robyn Adele Anderson
Robyn Adele Anderson on stage w Postmodern Jukebox.jpg

Anderson with Postmodern Jukebox in 2014 

 

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“Carole King – It’s Too Late”

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Carole King (born February 9, 1942) is a Grammy Award-winning American singer and songwriter.

Her career began in the 1960s when King, along with her then husband Gerry Goffin, wrote more than two dozen chart hits for numerous artists, many of which have become standards, and she has continued writing for other artists since then. King’s success as a performer in her own right did not come until the 1970s, when she sang her own songs, accompanying herself on the piano, in a series of albums and concerts. After experiencing commercial disappointment with her debut album Writer, King scored her breakthrough with the album Tapestry which topped the U.S. album chart for 15 weeks in 1971 and remained on the charts for more than six years.
Carole King – It’s Too Late:

 

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