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Category Archives: classic music

Big Girls Don’t Cry – The Four Seasons

Big Girls Don’t Cry – The Four Seasons

Big Girls Don’t Cry” is a song written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio and originally recorded by The Four Seasons. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 17, 1962, and, like its predecessor “Sherry,” spent five weeks in the top position but never ranked in the Billboard year-end charts of 1962 or 1963. The song also made it to number one, for three weeks, on Billboard‘s Rhythm and Bluessurvey.

According to Gaudio, he was dozing off while watching the John Payne/Rhonda Fleming/Ronald Reagan movie Tennessee’s Partner (1955) when he heard Payne’s character slap Fleming in the face. After the slap, Fleming’s character replied, “Big girls don’t cry.” Gaudio wrote the line on a scrap of paper, fell asleep, and wrote the song the next morning.[2][3]

However, the now-famous line does not appear in the Ronald Reagan film. According to Bob Crewe, he himself was dozing off in his Manhattan home with the television on when he awoke to see John Payne manhandling Rhonda Fleming in Slightly Scarlet, a 1956 film noir based on a James M. Cain story. The line is heard in that film.

Like “Sherry,” the lead in “Big Girls Don’t Cry” is sung mostly in falsetto. With this song, the Four Seasons became the first rock-era act to hit the top spot on the Hot 100 with their first two chart entries (their first single, “Bermuda”/”Spanish Lace,” did not appear on any Billboard chart in 1961).

Various episodes of Happy Days feature this song, most notably when it is played in the jukebox at Arnold’s diner. It was also used, with customized lyrics sung by the Four Seasons themselves, as the theme song to Joey Reynolds’s various radio programs throughout the United States.

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T11:36:31+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 11:36:31 +0000 31, in 1960s, classic music, male vocal group

 

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“The Beach Boys – Don’t Worry Baby”

“The Beach Boys – Don’t Worry Baby”

Don’t Worry Baby” is a song written by Brian Wilson and Roger Christian, produced by Wilson and first recorded by the American rock band, the Beach Boys. The band’s version, a tender ballad with falsetto lead vocal by Wilson, was first released on their 1964 album Shut Down Volume 2 .

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T10:25:49+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 10:25:49 +0000 31, in 1970s, classic music, male vocal group

 

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“The Boy from New York City” – The Ad Libs

“The Boy from New York City” – The Ad Libs

The Ad Libs were an American vocal group from Bayonne, New Jersey, United States, primarily active during the early 1960s. Featuring their characteristic female lead vocals with male “doo-wop” backing, their 1965 single “The Boy from New York City”,p written by George Davis and John T. Taylor, was their only Billboard Hot 100 hit. source

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:51:24+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:51:24 +0000 31, in black music artists, classic music

 

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Edith Piaf – Hymn To Love (Hymne à l’amour)

The lyrics were written by Piaf and the music by Marguerite Monnot. Piaf first sang this song at the Cabaret Versailles in New York City on September 14, 1949.[citation needed] It was written to her lover and the love of her life, the French boxer, Marcel Cerdan. On October 28, 1949, Cerdan was killed in a plane crash on his way from Paris to New York to come to see her. She recorded the song on May 2, 1950. source

youtube.com

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T09:30:34+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 09:30:34 +0000 31, in classic music, female vocalist, FRENCH FRIDAYS, retro

 

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“Java Jive” 

“Java Jive” 

Java Jive is a song performed by The Ink Spots that is an upbeat expression of their love for coffee. The band recorded the song, written by Ben Oakland and Milton Drake, in 1940. The lyrics reflect the slang of the day, including the reference to “Mr. Moto”, a fictional Japanese film spy. The Ink Spots continued to perform it later in their career.

The Manhattan Transfer also performed it on various occasions like Camera Three (1974), The Mike Douglas Show (1974), The Two Ronnies (1978), among others and recorded a popular version of the song in 1975.

source

https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=4ruD6K7fhs0&feature=share

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-14T08:22:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 14 Dec 2018 08:22:00 +0000 31, in classic music, coffee, music

 

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Last Christmas by Taylor Swift

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Taylor Alison Swift (born December 13, 1989) is an American singer-songwriter and actress. Raised in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, she moved to Nashville, Tennessee, at the age of 14 to pursue a career in country music. She signed with the independent label Big Machine Records and became the youngest songwriter ever hired by the Sony/ATV Music publishing house. The release of Swift’s self-titled debut album in 2006 marked the start of her career as a country music singer. Her third single, “Our Song,” made her the youngest person to single-handedly write and perform a number-one song on the Hot Country Songs chart.

Swift’s second album, Fearless, was released in 2008. Buoyed by the pop crossover success of the singles “Love Story” and “You Belong with Me,” Fearless became the best-selling album of 2009 in the United States. The album won four Grammy Awards, making Swift the youngest ever Album of the Year winner. Swift’s third and fourth albums, 2010’s Speak Now and 2012’s Red, both sold more than one million copies within the first week of their U.S release. Speak Now’s “Mean” won two Grammy Awards, while Red’s singles “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” and “I Knew You Were Trouble” were successful worldwide. Swift’s fifth album, the pop-focused 1989, was released in 2014 and sold more copies in its opening week than any album in the previous 12 years, making Swift the first and only act to have three albums sell more than one million copies in the opening release week. Its singles “Shake It Off”, “Blank Space”, and “Bad Blood” reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100.

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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-10T11:20:17+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 10 Dec 2018 11:20:17 +0000 31, in American music artists, classic music, coffee, entertainment, female vocalist, music

 

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“I Say a Little Prayer” performed by Aretha Franklin. (1960s)

“I Say a Little Prayer” performed by Aretha Franklin. (1960s)

ABOUT THE SONG

“I Say a Little Prayer” is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David for Dionne Warwick, originally peaking at number four on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in December 1967.

Background and
Other recordings

Warwick’s “I Say a Little Prayer” did not appear on the Billboard Easy Listening chart although two instrumental versions of the song were Easy Listening chart items in 1968: the first by Sérgio Mendes at No. 21 in the spring of 1968 while that fall Julius Wechter and the Baja Marimba Band took “I Say a Little Prayer” to No. 10 Easy Listening.

“I Say a Little Prayer” also returned to the Pop & R&B Top Ten in the fall of 1968 via a recording by Aretha Franklin taken from her 1968 Aretha Now album. Franklin and background vocalists the Sweet Inspirations were singing the song for fun while rehearsing the songs intended for the album when the viability of Franklin actually recording “I Say a Little Prayer” became apparent, significantly re-invented from the format of the Dionne Warwick original via the prominence of Clayton Ivey’s piano work and the choral vocals of the Sweet Inspirations. Similar to the history of Warwick’s double-sided hit, the Aretha Franklin version was intended as the B-side of the July 1968 single release “The House that Jack Built” but began to accrue its own airplay that August. Even with “The House That Jack Built” ranking as high as No. 6 (#2 R&B) in September 1968, “I Say a Little Prayer” reached No. 10 (#3 R&B) that October, the same month the single was certified Gold by the RIAA. “Prayer” became Franklin’s ninth and last consecutive Hot 100 top 10 hit on the Atlantic label (not counting every flip side), with each of the nine curiously peaking at a different position. Franklin’s “Prayer” has a special significance in her UK career, as with its September 1968 No. 4 peak it became Franklin’s biggest UK hit; subsequently Franklin has surpassed that track’s UK peak only with her No. 1 collaboration with George Michael, “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)”. In February 1987, UK music weekly New Musical Express published its critics’ top 150 singles of all time, with Franklin’s “I Say a Little Prayer” ranked at No. 1, followed by Al Green’s “Tired of Being Alone” and Warwick’s “Walk On By”. (Franklin’s “I Say a Little Prayer” did not appear in the magazine’s in-house critics’ top 100 singles poll conducted in November 2002.)

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-10T11:10:26+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 10 Dec 2018 11:10:26 +0000 31, in American music artists, black music artists, classic music, entertainment, music, r&b, soul oldies

 

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