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Colombian Desserts and Sweets

If you’ve never tried traditional Colombian desserts, you have no idea what you’re missinging.

While Colombian sweet dishes are perhaps not given a lot of credit internationally, they certainly deserve the attention of tourists and travellers in Colombia with a sweet tooth. If you’re one of these travellers, we recommend you seek out at least some of the following typical desserts and sweets during your tour to Colombia.

http://www.uncovercolombia.com/en/item/10-reasons-i-like-colombia-2

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, Monday Madness

 

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Columbian: Torta de Café (Coffee Flavored Cake) and more

Columbian: Torta de Café (Coffee Flavored Cake) and more


Torta de Manzana (Colombian-Style Apple Cake)  image:  Pinterest.com

For most Colombians, no day begins without coffee (cafecito), while no meal ends without it, and it’s offered to guests any time of the day. We drink it black or with milk, the latter we call ‘café con leche’. I can’t imagine starting a day without coffee! I love just about any food and drink with coffee flavor. In Colombia, we often use coffee to make traditional desserts, cocktails and savory dishes.


http://www.mycolombianrecipes.com/torta-de-cafe-coffee-flavored-cake

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, Monday Madness

 

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SPANISH OMELET

SPANISH OMELET

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2017 in breakfast, brunch

 

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“HOW TO MAKE FRENCH MACARONS” 

 
 

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C’est La Vie – sung by Emerson, Lake and Palmer

C’est La Vie – sung by Emerson, Lake and Palmer

Emerson, Lake and Palmer is an English progressive rock band Emerson, Lake & Palmer, released as a double album in March 1977 on Atlantic Records. Following their successful 1974 world tour, the group took a break from recording and touring. They relocated to Montreux, Switzerland and Paris, France to record a new album. Each member was allocated one side of a vinyl record to write and arrange their own tracks which were performed by the group. The fourth side features songs written by the entire group. Emerson wrote his Piano Concerto No. 1, Lake wrote several songs with Peter Sinfield, and Palmer picked tracks of varied styles.

en.m.wikipedia.org

BAGUETTE, DELICIOUS FRENCH BREAD 

A baguette (English pronunciation: /bæˈɡɛt/; French pronunciation: [baˈɡɛt]) is a long thin loaf of French bread[1] that is commonly made from basic lean dough (the dough, though not the shape, is defined by French law). It is distinguishable by its length and crisp crust.

A baguette has a diameter of about 5 or 6 centimetres (2 or 2⅓ in) and a usual length of about 65 centimetres (26 in), although a baguette can be up to a metre (39 in) long.

History

The word “baguette” was not used to refer to a type of bread until 1920,[2] but what is now known as a baguette may have existed well before that. The word, derived from the Italian bacchetta,[3][4] simply means “wand” or “baton”, as in baguette magique (magic wand), baguettes chinoises (chopsticks), or baguette de direction (conductor’s baton).

Though the baguette today is often considered one of the symbols of French culture viewed from abroad, the association of France with long loaves predates any mention of it. Long, if wide, loaves had been made since the time of King Louis XIV, long thin ones since the mid-eighteenth century and by the nineteenth century some were far longer than the baguette: “… loaves of bread six feet long that look like crowbars!” (1862);[5] “Housemaids were hurrying homewards with their purchases for various Gallic breakfasts, and the long sticks of bread, a yard or two in length, carried under their arms, made an odd impression upon me.” (1898)[6]

A less direct link can be made however with deck ovens, or steam ovens. Deck/steam ovens are a combination of a gas-fired traditional oven and a brick oven, a thick “deck” of stone or firebrick heated by natural gas instead of wood. The first steam oven was brought (in the early nineteenth century) to Paris by the Austrian officer August Zang, who also introduced Vienna bread (pain viennois) and the croissant, and whom some French sources thus credit with originating the baguette.[7]

Deck ovens use steam injection, through various methods, to create the proper baguette. The oven is typically heated to well over 200 °C (390 °F). The steam allows the crust to expand before setting, thus creating a lighter, airier loaf. It also melts the dextrose on the bread’s surface, giving a slightly glazed effect.

An unsourced article in The Economist states that in October 1920 a law prevented bakers from working before 4 a.m., making it impossible to make the traditional, round loaf in time for customers’ breakfasts. The slender baguette, the article claims, solved the problem, because it could be prepared and baked much more rapidly,[8] though France had already had long thin breads for over a century at that point.

The law in question appears to be one from March 1919, though some say it took effect in October 1920:

It is forbidden to employ workers at bread and pastry making between ten in the evening and four in the morning.[9]

The rest of the account remains to be verified, but the use of the word for a long thin bread does appear to be a twentieth century innovation.

Manufacture and styles 

220px-baguette_mie.jpg

A “baguette de tradition française”

Baguette on bread board for table service in a restaurant

The “baguette de tradition française” is made from wheat flour, water, yeast, and common salt. It does not contain additives, but it may contain up to 2% broad bean flour, up to 0.5% soya flour, and up to 0.3% wheat malt flour.[10]

While a regular baguette is made with a direct addition of baker’s yeast, it is not unusual for artisan-style loaves to be made with a pre-ferment or “poolish”, “biga” or other bread pre-ferments to increase flavor complexity and other characteristics, as well as the addition of whole-wheat flour, or other grains such as rye.
Baguettes are closely connected to France, though they are made around the world. In France, not all long loaves are baguettes; for example, a short, almost rugby ball shaped loaf is a bâtard (literally, bastard), or a “torpedo loaf” in English; its origin is variously explained, but undocumented. Another tubular shaped loaf is known as a flûte, also known in the United States as a parisienne. Flûtes closely resemble baguettes and weigh more or less than these, depending on the region.[citation needed] A thinner loaf is called a ficelle (string). A short baguette is sometimes known as a baton (stick), or even referred to using the English translation French stick. None of these are officially defined, either legally or, for instance, in major dictionaries, any more than the baguette. French breads are also made in forms such as a miche, which is a large pan loaf, and a boule, literally ball in French, a large round loaf. Sandwich-sized loaves are sometimes known as demi-baguettes or tiers. In France a baguette must weigh 250 grams (8.75 ounces), a batard 500 grams (17.5 ounces) and a ficelle 100 grams (3.5 ounces). Baguettes, either relatively short single-serving size or cut from a longer loaf, are very often used for sandwiches, usually of the submarine sandwich type, but also panini. They are often sliced and served with pâté or cheese. As part of the traditional continental breakfast in France, slices of baguette are spread with butter and jam and dunked in bowls of coffee or hot chocolate. In the United States, French bread loaves are sometimes split in half to make French bread pizza.

Baguettes are generally made as partially free-form loaves, with the loaf formed with a series of folding and rolling motions, raised in cloth-lined baskets or in rows on a flour-impregnated towel, called a couche, and baked either directly on the hearth of a deck oven or in special perforated pans designed to hold the shape of the baguette while allowing heat through the perforations. American-style “French bread” is generally much fatter and is not baked in deck ovens, but in convection ovens.

Outside France, baguettes are also made with other doughs. For example, the Vietnamese bánh mì uses a high proportion of rice flour, while many North American bakeries make whole wheat, multigrain, and sourdough baguettes alongside French-style loaves. In addition, even classical French-style recipes vary from place to place, with some recipes adding small amounts of milk, butter, sugar, or malt extract, depending on the desired flavour and properties in the final loaf.

en.m.wikipedia.org

FRENCH BAGUETTE MENU

http://www.parisbaguettesg.com/menu/

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2017 in brunch, FRENCH FRIDAYS, music

 

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Carrot Cake Pancakes with Cream Cheese Frosting – Gemma’s Bigger Bolder Baking 

Carrot Cake Pancakes with Cream Cheese Frosting – Gemma’s Bigger Bolder Baking 

http://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/carrot-cake-pancakes/

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, coffee

 

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“Cream Puffs Recipe: With Strawberry, Chocolate Custard and Vanilla Custard Filling” 

In this video, Nadia demonstrates how to make Cream Puffs right out of your kitchen. Cream puffs are a great dessert for all occasions and people love them! They are light, delicious and just the right amount of sweetness. This video shows how to make the cream puff shell and then fill with whip cream and strawberries, vanilla custard and chocolate custard. Topped either with powdered sugar, cocoa powder or dipped in chocolate.

recipe(s) and more at source:

http://myrecipepicks.com/BakingWithNadia/cream-puffs-recipe-with-strawberry-chocolate-custard-and-vanilla-custard-filling/

 
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Posted by on February 13, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, coffee

 

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