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“Barbecues Around The World” 

“Barbecues Around The World” 

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Barbecue remains one of the most traditional foods in the United States. While many festive foods, such as roasted turkey or ham, are usually served on particular days or holidays, barbecue can be served on any day. Barbecue is often served on the Fourth of July, however, it is not only confined to that day. Barbecues tend to bring people together and serve as a bonding experience at any time of the year. It brings people back to their roots, providing a cooking experience that is often an escape from civilization and closer to nature.[22] Barbecues are traditionally held outside. They could be small informal gatherings with a few of people in a backyard or a formal event that could last all day, typically held for larger amounts of people. Barbecue has been a tradition in the United States beginning with Native Americans. As author Andrew Warnes states, “its mythology of savagery and freedom, of pleasure, masculinity and strength” is part of what makes barbecues so popular to date.[23] By the 19th century barbecues became one of the main forms of United States public celebration, especially in celebration of July 4.[24] As barbecues continued to be held through the times of U.S. expansion the traditions began to migrate with the people. Today barbecues held in different regions of the country vary in cuisine but the cuisines all hold the same concept of cooking outside and over a fire.[25] Barbecues today have taken on new meaning yet again with the emergence of competitive barbecue. Competitive barbecue competitions are held throughout the country in which people will compete by cooking barbecue and having it judged by the events judges. The constraints of what one may barbecue and the qualities that are judged vary by competition. Usually competitions are held in big open areas where spectators will be admitted as well and barbecue is served to all.[26][27]

TechniquesEdit

Barbecue cooking  using smoke at low temperatures

Barbecuing encompasses four or five distinct types of cooking techniques. The original technique is cooking using smoke at low temperatures—usually around 240–280 °F or 115–145 °C—and significantly longer cooking times (several hours), known as smoking. Another technique, known as baking, used a masonry oven or baking oven that uses convection to cook meats and starches with moderate temperatures for an average cooking time of about an hour. Braising combines direct, dry heat charbroiling on a ribbed surface with a broth-filled pot for moist heat. Using this technique, cooking occurs at various speeds, starting fast, slowing down, then speeding up again, lasting for a few hours.[28][29]

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Grilling is done over direct, dry heat, usually over a hot fire over 500 °F (260 °C) for a few minutes. Grilling may be done over wood, charcoal, gas, or electricity. The time difference between barbecuing and grilling is because of the temperature difference; at low temperatures used for barbecuing, meat takes several hours to reach the desired internal temperature.[30][31]

SmokingEdit

Chicken, pork and bacon-wrapped corn cooked in a barbecue smoker

Smoking is the process of flavoring, cooking, and/or preserving food by exposing it to smoke from burning or smoldering material, most often wood. Meat and fish are the most common smoked foods, though cheeses, vegetables, nuts, and ingredients used to make beverages such as beer or smoked beer are also smoked.[32][full citation needed]

RoastingEdit

The masonry oven is similar to a smoke pit; it allows for an open flame but cooks more quickly and uses convection to cook. Barbecue-baking can also be done in traditional stove-ovens. It can be used to cook meats, breads and other starches, casseroles, and desserts. It uses direct and indirect heat to surround the food with hot air to cook, and can be basted in much the same manner as grilled foods.[33]

BraisingEdit

It is possible to braise meats and vegetables in a pot on top of a grill. A gas or electric charbroil grill are the best choices for barbecue-braising, combining dry heat charbroil-grilling directly on a ribbed surface and braising in a broth-filled pot for moist heat. The pot is placed on top of the grill, covered, and allowed to simmer for a few hours. There are two advantages to barbecue-braising; it allows browning of the meat directly on the grill before the braising. It also allows for glazing of meat with sauce and finishing it directly over the fire after the braising. This effectively cooks the meat three times, which results in a soft, textured product that falls off the bone. The time needed for braising varies depending on whether a slow cooker or pressure cooker is used; it is generally slower than regular grilling or baking, but quicker than pit-smoking.[citation needed]

Wiikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on June 26, 2017 in brunch

 

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“Real” Dancing Frog Legs – You Have Been Warned!

Food blog: Are frogs on their last legs?

http://magspace.ru/blog/


Why we shouldn’t eat frogs’ leg…

Every year, the French nibble away at 4,000 tonnes of frogs’ legs. But that’s nothing compared with the vast number being eaten in Asia, South America and even the US. And it’s pushing the world’s frog population towards extinction, says Jon Henley.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/aug/07/frogs-legs-extinction

 
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Posted by on June 26, 2017 in brunch

 

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“COFFEES FROM AROUND THE WORLD….” – On YouTube

interestingly, every culture has its own taste and coffee preparation. View the various simple barista techniques, right here:

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Coffee World
freestock.ca

 
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Posted by on June 19, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, coffee, reflections

 

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French Cuisine, Deliciously Esquisite 


A nouvelle cuisine 

French haute cuisine 

French wines are usually made to accompany French cuisine


French cuisine consists of the cooking traditions and practices from France.

In the 14th century Guillaume Tirel, a court chef known as “Taillevent”, wrote Le Viandier, one of the earliest recipe collections of medieval France. During that time, French cuisine was heavily influenced by Italian cuisine. In the 17th century, chefs François Pierre La Varenne and Marie-Antoine Carême spearheaded movements that shifted French cooking away from its foreign influences and developed France’s own indigenous style. Cheese and wine are a major part of the cuisine. They play different roles regionally and nationally, with many variations and appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) (regulated appellation) laws.

French cuisine was codified in the 20th century by Auguste Escoffier to become the modern haute cuisine; Escoffier, however, left out much of the local culinary character to be found in the regions of France and was considered difficult to execute by home cooks. Gastro-tourism and the Guide Michelin helped to acquaint people with the rich bourgeois and peasant cuisine of the French countryside starting in the 20th century. Gascon cuisine has also had great influence over the cuisine in the southwest of France. Many dishes that were once regional have proliferated in variations across the country.

Knowledge of French cooking has contributed significantly to Western cuisines. Its criteria are used widely in Western cookery school boards and culinary education. In November 2010, French gastronomy was added by the UNESCO to its lists of the world’s “intangible cultural heritage”.[1][2
http://www.gpedia.com/en/m/gpedia/French_cuisine

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2017 in brunch

 

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Jacques Pepin’s Gratin Dauphinois – Scalloped Potatoes: Maui Girl Cooks

Jacques Pepin’s Gratin Dauphinois – Scalloped Potatoes: Maui Girl Cooks

Gratin Dauphinois
{Scalloped Potatoes in Garlic and Cream}

2 lbs boiling potatoes {5-6 cups, sliced}-I usually use Yukon Golds

1 lg clove garlic

2 c milk {If I am buying milk for this dish, I’ll get whole milk, but if I already have 2%, I will use it. They are still delicious!}

1 1/2 c heavy cream

3/4 tsp kosher salt

1/2 t freshly ground white pepper {You could use black pepper, but you will see black specks in your potatoes. I can live with that, but I usually have a little bag of white peppercorns on hand. I simply empty my pepper grinder into a little bowl, put the white peppercorns in the pepper mill and grind away. Then put the black peppercorns back into the mill.}

1 tbsp butter

1/2 c grated Swiss cheese {about 2 ounces}-I always use Jarlsberg or Gruyere since we always have one of these in the refrigerator.

Peel the potatoes, wash and dry thoroughly. Slice the potatoes fairly thin-1/8” thick. I use my Cuisinart 3mm slicing blade. Do not soak the potatoes in water or they will lose the starch needed for the dish to be smooth.

Peel the garlic; crush it with the broad side of a knife and chop it very fine. It should have the consistency of a puree. In a large heavy saucepan, combine the potato slices with the garlic, milk, cream, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon to prevent scorching {and the mixture can scorch very easily}. As the liquid gets hotter, the mixture will thicken slightly; remove from heat.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Butter a shallow glass baking dish {I use 9” x 13”} about 1 1/2” deep, and pour in the potato mixture. Sprinkle cheese all over the top; place dish on a cookie sheet to catch any spills and to allow more even transfer of heat. Bake for about 1 hour, until potatoes are golden brown and tender when pierced with the point of a knife. Let rest for 15”-20” before serving.

Makes 6 servings

Bon appetit!
Source: https://mauigirlcooks.com

Most people are not aware of the difference in preparing gratin and au gratin foods.

(includes most commonly potatoes, fish and other seafood) Au gratin, by definition, means “covered with breadcrumbs or cheese and then baked until brown,” while more specifically, Gratin aka: scallop potatoes or vegies (French pronunciation ​[ɡʁatɛ̃]) is a widespread culinary technique in which an ingredient is topped with a browned crust, often using breadcrumbsgrated cheese, egg and/or butter.[1][2][3] Gratin originated in French cuisine and is usually prepared in a shallow dish of some kind. A gratin is baked or cooked under an overhead grill or broiler to form a golden crust on top and is traditionally served in its baking dish.[1]

gratin dish refers to the shallow oven-proof container traditionally used to prepare gratins and similar dishes.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2017 in brunch

 

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3 Easy Summer Salads

3 Easy Summer Salads

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2017 in brunch

 

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Coffee Fellowship And Hospitality … All Drinks Are Welcome!

Coffee Fellowship And Hospitality … All Drinks Are Welcome!

image: clipartkid.com

image:  jennycancook.com

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2017 in brunch, coffee, entertainment

 

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