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Category Archives: brunch

“Deadwaiter”Strange things happen.  But do they happen at a Bed and Breakfast?

“Deadwaiter”Strange things happen.  But do they happen at a Bed and Breakfast?

Originally posted on BarefeetBaristasArePeerk’d!

https://wp.me/p57bLb-1JV

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-10T12:30:08+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 10 Dec 2018 12:30:08 +0000 31, in breakfast, brunch, entertainment

 

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Cozy Railway-Themed Coffee Spots

In the U.S.A., trains date back to the old west and cowboy era, However, during these modern times, wagon trains and railway have inspired many innovations about trails and railways. We can attribute these makeovers to: time, technology and trends. Mass transportation has transitioned from horsepower, locomotion to being propelled by various modern energy sources. Passengers, waiters, cooks, porters and conductors, have all been impacted and/or displaced.

What are some of the changes that have taken place? Railways and trains are being modified into unique structures. Some of the most popular modifications have been stationary museums. Others are used solely for public accommodations. And many are utilized in full or part, for transportation.

As people, places and needs for accommodations keep transitioning, more railway concepts are coming forth. Keep in mind that whichever innovative train adventure you choose to journey, it will be fun, nostalgic and very scenic.

….AOC Commentary

Railroads have been an integral part of our country’s history, connecting east to west, shipping supply to demand, and connecting farm to hungry city table. It’s a rich history tied to – and driving – major events, and it’s a history worth seeing, smelling and feeling up close. The following museums let visitors hear the steam-whistle blow, smell the grease on the axels and step back in time. source

The Exterior of Starbucks’ Railway Coffee Coach – image #1

Learn more about Starbucks’ Railway Service

The Service Style Inside A Starbucks’ Railway Coffee Coach – image #2

Starbucks’ Railway Coffee Coach seatings – image#3

Featherbed Railrod Bed and Breakfast Resort. image#1 Learn more

Casablanca Caboose At Featherbed Railroad In Northern California’s Throughout Bed And Breakfast Wine Country CaliforniaFeatherbed#2

Featherbed. A Bed and Breakfast – image #3

Featherbed Bed and Breakfast(exterior) – image #4

Featherbed Railroad Caboose themed Bed and Breakfast – Exterior (located on California) – image#5

Featherbed Railroad Caboose-themed Bed and Breakfast – Different Exterior Angle – image#6

Featherbed Railroad Caboose-themed Bed and Breakfast – Interior – image #7

Featherbed Railroad Caboose-themed Bed and Breakfast – Interior – image #8

Nederland Buffalo Bills Coffee Shop ( located Boulder Colorado) learn more…

TWhistle Stop Bed and Breakfast – (NY Mills, MN) – Image#1

Whistle Stop Bed and Breakfast – (NY Mills, MN) – Image#2

Whistle Stop Bed and Breakfast – (NY Mills, MN) – Image#3

Whistle Stop Bed and Breakfast – (NY Mills, MN) – Image#4

The Train Carriage Coffee Shop (located Colorado)

“… a great coffee shop built out of three old railcars which I couldn’t resist photographing while sipping on my cappuchino.” – image#1 Learn more. Visit site.

The Train Carriage Coffee Shop (located Colorado) – image#2

The Train Carriage Coffee Shop (located Colorado) – image#3

Railroad and Old West themed joint – Picture of Wagon Train (located California) – image#1…

Railroad and Old West themed joint – Picture of Wagon Train – image #2…

Railroad and Old West themed joint – Picture of Wagon Train – image #3…

Railroad Coffee Shop – O’Gauge Railroading read more at source

The Rail Coffee Room – Exterior (AMTK Station, Centralia Ilinois) – image#1 source

The Rail Coffee Room – Interior (AMTK Station, Centralia Ilinois) – image #2

The Rail Coffee Room – Interior (AMTK Station, Centralia Ilinois) – image#3

Enjoy Your Coffee Today!!

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-10T12:20:33+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 10 Dec 2018 12:20:33 +0000 31, in breakfast, brunch, coffee, reflections

 

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FRENCH TOAST THREE WAYS |BRUNCH

​https://youtu.be/OEchkgHTKhg

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-10T11:16:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 10 Dec 2018 11:16:00 +0000 31, in breakfast, brunch, FRENCH FRIDAYS

 

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Black Bean Tacos

Black Bean Tacos

Ingredients

1 can (14 oz) black beans, drained and rinsed
1 medium onion
6-8 baby bell mushrooms
1 clove garlic
1/2 jalapeno
1 tablespoon olive oil
Dash of salt
Dash of pepper
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon red pepper

Instructions

Chop the onions, mushrooms, garlic and jalapeno.

In a medium saucepan brought to high heat, add olive oil, onion, garlic, jalapeno, salt and ground black pepper. Stir and cook until onions become slightly transparent. Add chopped mushrooms along with the red pepper and cumin. Cook for another 3-5 minutes or until mushrooms are tender.

Add drained and rinsed black beans and stir until warmed.

Scoop black bean mixture into hard or soft tacos and top with greens, tomatoes, guacamole, or sour cream. Enjoy!

 
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Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-09T11:56:31+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 09 Dec 2018 11:56:31 +0000 31, in brunch

 

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James Van Der Beek’s ‘Famous’ Mung Bean Pancake Recipe 

James Van Der Beek’s ‘Famous’ Mung Bean Pancake Recipe 

James David Van Der Beek is an American actor. He is best known for his portrayal of Dawson Leery in the WB series Dawson’s Creek. (wikipedia.org)

When you’re jet lagged in James Van Der Beek‘s household, pancakes are just the solution for an easy breakfast.

After flying home from London, the Dawson’s Creek alum got to work in the kitchen on Sunday, whipping up what he calls his “famous pancake recipe” on his Instagram story — and even got a little help from his adorable kids.

James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

“And try to ignore the chaos,” he says as he zooms over to his daughter Annabel, 3, crying about a very serious coloring matter.

James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

He says to set the griddle to 250 degrees, pour the mixture on and flip when they bubble.

The 40-year-old revealed his “secret ingredient” for his flapjacks is mung beans, which he boils with rice before before blending and adding to classic pancake batter.

“It’s what you make dal out of,” Van Der Beek says, referring to the traditional Indian stew that uses the beans.

James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

“And try to ignore the chaos,” he says as he zooms over to his daughter Annabel, 3, crying about a very serious coloring matter.

The actor also has a smart tip for prepping the ingredient: “When you boil the mung beans, the shells come off so you kinda just pick them out like that and that’s how you deshell them.”

Van Der Beek’s son Joshua, 5, then makes a cute cameo as he was put to work on stirring duty, mixing up the rest of the ingredients.

James Van Der Beek’s Mung Bean Pancakes

¼ cup mung beans, rinsed
¼ cup rice, rinsed
Chopped dates
3 eggs
3 tbsp. coconut oil
3 cups pancake mix
1 palmful cinnamon

1. In a saucepan, boil beans and rice in 1 cup water until tender. Transfer the mixture to the blender, add dates and puree until smooth.

2. Stir together the remaining ingredients with 2 1/4 cups water, then whisk in the mung bean puree.

3. Heat a griddle to 250° and ladle the batter into circles. When the tops start to bubble, flip the pancakes and cook on the other side.

Source: http://people.com/food/james-van-der-beek-mung-bean-pancake-recipe/

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.hungryforever.com/james-van-der-beeks-pancakes-way-healthier/amp/

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-03T14:15:30+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 03 Dec 2018 14:15:30 +0000 31, in breakfast, brunch

 

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From Summer Heatwave to An Icy Chill : A Hotel Made of Ice… The IceHotel

From Summer Heatwave to An Icy Chill : A Hotel Made of Ice… The IceHotel

Featured image: icehotel.com/art-suite-acanthus

The entrance of ICEHOTEL in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden, 2007, with two kicksleds outside

An ice hotel is a temporary hotel made up of snow and sculpted blocks of ice.[1]Ice hotels are dependent on sub-freezing temperatures, are constructed from ice and snow and typically have to be rebuilt every year. Ice hotels exist in several countries, and they have varying construction styles, services and amenities, the latter of which may include ice bars, restaurants, chapels, saunas and hot tubs.

The Icehotel (styled as ICEHOTEL) is a hotel rebuilt each year with snow and ice in the village of Jukkasjärvi, in northern Sweden, about 17 kilometres (11 mi) from Kiruna. It is the world’s first ice hotel.[1]
The entire hotel is made out of snow and ice blocks from the Torne River, even the glasses in the bar are made of ice. Each spring, around March, Icehotel harvests tons of ice from the frozen Torne River and stores it in a nearby production hall with room for over 900 t (990 short tons) of ice and 27,000 t (30,000 short tons) of snow.

The ice is used for creating Icebar designs and ice glasses, which are used for ice sculpting classes, events and product launches all over the world while the snow is used for building a strong structure for the building. About 900 t (990 short tons) of what is left is used in the construction of the next Icehotel.
When completed, the hotel features a bar, church, main hall, reception area, plus about 100 rooms for guests.
[3] The room rate starts at 1500 kr. The hotel hosts also an ice restaurant.[4] The furniture is sculpted blocks of ice in the form of chairs and beds. The thick walls, floor and ceiling are made of ice. Even the beds, the fittings and decoration are carved from ice. No two rooms are the same; the rooms are unique works of art. At the Icehotel the beds are bedded with reindeer furs and people are given special equipment to use while sleeping in the hotel. The guests sleep in polar-tested sleeping bags. There is no heating and the bedroom temperatures are constantly around −5 °C (23 °F). There’s no plumbing at the hotel, but there’s a sauna that is run on the premises of the Icehotel with hot tub outdoors.[1]

The ice suites do not have any bathroom facilities but bathrooms for guests are found in a warm building close by. There is also warm accommodation available next to the hotel. The Icehotel in Jukkasjärvi is known to be the biggest hotel of ice and snow in the world, spanning over some 6,000 square metres (64,600 sq ft).[5] Each suite is unique and the architecture of the hotel is changed each year, as it is rebuilt from scratch. Each year, artists submit their ideas for suites, and a jury selects about 50 artists to create the church, Absolut Icebar, reception, main hall and suites. When spring comes, everything melts away and returns to the Torne River. The Icehotel only exists between December and April, and has been listed as one of the Seven Wonders of Sweden.[6] The northern hemisphere’s aurora borealis can be seen during the winter month in the location.[2]

Documentaries that focus on this hotel can be seen from time to time on the Discovery Channel[7][8] and National Geographic.[9] The hotel appeared in a sketch about Sweden in one of the shows of the Eurovision Song Contest 2013, courtesy of Lynda Woodruff. The Icehotel has guests from many countries. There are many charter flights to the nearby Kiruna Airport, directly from London.[10]

Wikipedia.org

SWEDISH COFFEE
Swedish coffee – better than Irish coffee? You decide! You make the coffee drink simple with punsch, coffee, cream and cocoa. Excellent to serve after dinner or when you want to warm up with something more luxurious than usual coffee!

INGREDIENTS
PORTIONS: 1 glass
2 tablespoons punsch
About 1 1/2 dl freshly brewed coffee
2 1/2 tablespoons light whipped cream
Cocoa or coffee beans for garnishing

DO THIS:

Pour the punch into a heat-resistant glass (for 1 glass).
Fill with hot coffee and spice with cream.
Sprinkle some cocoa or garnish with a few coffee beans and serve.

https://www.ica.se/recept/swedish-coffee-621855/

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-03T13:04:00+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 03 Dec 2018 13:04:00 +0000 31, in breakfast, brunch, coffee, entertainment

 

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FOR LOVE OF HOBBIT… (Is to enjoy its amenities and quaint coziness)

FOR LOVE OF HOBBIT… (Is to enjoy its amenities and quaint coziness)

Dining with the Hobbits at Hobbit Tavern in Boraclay Philippines

A Noted hospitality excerpt:

by |

“We indulged instead in Frozen Ice Cream, Banana Split and Irish Coffee.

Frozen Ice Cream, Banana Split

Frozen Ice Cream, Banana Split

Irish Coffee

Irish Coffee

During this time at Hobbit Tavern, I was also able to chat with the “hobbits”, whose cheerful, willful and easy-going energies I was so grateful to have exchanged with.

Thus, with memories of Hobbit Tavern’s wonderful gastronomy and amazing staff, I will be glad to relive them again, also to catch acoustic guitar performances by some of the island’s talented musicians.”

Hobbit Tavern is located in D’Mall, Station 2, White Beach, Boracay. For further details, contact 0917 714 6863, and like and follow https://www.facebook.com/HobbitTavernBoracay/

Source: http://www.lalunavida.com/index.php/2017/07/07/dining-with-the-hobbits-at-hobbit-tavern-boracay/

Boise tiny-house entrepreneur’s ‘Hobbit Hole’ near Chelan a hit on Airbnb
The view of the front of the Hobbit Hole vacation-rental house near Chelan, Washington. (Courtesy of Kristie Wolfe)

The view of the front of the Hobbit Hole vacation-rental house near Chelan, Washington. (Courtesy of Kristie Wolfe)

The view of the front of the Hobbit Hole vacation-rental house near Chelan, Washington. (Courtesy of Kristie Wolfe)Here’s my full story from spokesman.com: By Betsy Z. Russell

BOISE – Hobbits enjoy food, simple comforts, and their peaceful home settings.

And now Lord of the Rings fans can too, with a vacation getaway in a cozy burrow under a hill near Chelan, Washington, developed by a tiny-house entrepreneur from Boise.

Kristie Wolfe opened her first Hobbit Hole vacation rental through Airbnb this spring, with two more planned in a 5-acre village along an Eastern Washington hillside that could be from The Shire of J.R.R. Tolkien.

Wrote one recent visitor, “Definitely a recommendation to any weary wanderers wanting to get away from it all and rest their hairy feet.”

It’s 288 square feet of rustic comfort overlooking the Columbia River, including woodworking tools so the occupants can do a bit of whittling, a stone fireplace, a pastry and coffee bar, tub for two and off-the-grid solar power and running water. When visitors book their stay, they receive a Tolkien-style map with directions, like something right out of Middle-earth.

“The majority of your neighbors will be deer, rabbits, birds and grouse,” Wolfe writes on her Airbnb listing. “It’s 2 miles up the mountain, and although there are houses it gets more remote the closer you get to the hobbit hole.”

Wolfe has turned her small-living love into her living. First, she built a 97-square-foot tiny house in Boise with recycled and reclaimed materials, and lived there for a year, finding that it fit.

“The forced simplicity is hard to explain, unless you don’t have a lot of stuff weighing you down,” she said.

Wolfe

After moving the tiny house to an isolated, sagebrush-desert parcel she purchased south of Boise – where it’s now under construction to add a kitchen to its off-the-grid “tiny house on the prairie” setup – she took on a more ambitious project: A tiny treehouse in the rainforest on the Big Island of Hawaii, now a popular and nearly always booked vacation rental.

In between, she spent parts of two years traveling the country on a truck shaped like a giant, 6-ton Idaho potato, working as a spokeswoman for the Idaho Potato Commission. It was an ideal job for Wolfe, a well-read high school dropout and daughter of a school teacher. She hails from Pocatello and loves Idaho and potatoes; she once spent a year covered in dirt from head to toe, working at a Simplot potato factory in eastern Idaho, sorting tubers as they arrived in the receiving department.

In the months-long stints traveling the country on the giant-potato truck, along with a driver and another spokesperson – “It could be Times Square or a town of 400 people” – Wolfe said there was one question she got everywhere: “Is it real?”

“We never say yes or no,” she said of the giant potato, which is made of concrete. “We say, ‘It’s really big’ or ‘It’s really awesome.’”

Wolfe grew up helping her mom and five siblings remodel the houses where they lived and then sell them to make extra money. She and her brothers and sisters all learned to use tools, and she fell in love with construction, she said.

She owned a clothing store in Pocatello for three years in a commercial building she and her brother remodeled, and helped people flip houses. Her tiny-house build was her first from the ground up, constructed in her aunt’s backyard.

Wolfe’s mother helped her build the Hawaiian treehouse, which features a dreamy hanging bed suspended below the tiny living space made from a trampoline, a rainwater collection system and solar power. When her mom balked at working on ladders high above the mud, “I kept telling her, ‘Well, the next one will be on the ground, the next one will be in the hill,’” Wolfe said.

That’s the hobbit hole. Wolfe and her mom toured Oregon and Washington by car, looking for the right spot, before finding the hillside near Chelan that spoke to her of the Shire, of which Tolkien wrote, “They passed through hobbit-lands, a wide, respectable country inhabited by decent folk, with good roads, an inn or two, and now and then a dwarf or a farmer ambling along on business.”

Wolfe signed on with HGTV last fall to construct her hobbit hole as a pilot for a reality TV series, but it wasn’t picked up. She wasn’t thrilled with the TV experience, and says if she does it again, she’d want to own the production company.

But the hobbit hole was a success. “This one is permitted – Douglas County was awesome and worked with us,” she said. “I did lots of research.”

Though Wolfe had done everything herself, with her mom’s help, on her previous two tiny-house builds, she hired excavators and other experts to help create the hobbit hole in the hillside. Construction was completed last fall, but the utilities weren’t hooked up; over the winter, it was surrounded by up to five feet of snow, and stayed snug and dry inside. That was “a good test,” Wolfe said.

The hobbit hole opened to renters in May; it rents for between $200 and $250 a night, depending on the date, plus a $75 cleaning fee. It’s solar-powered, and water is trucked in to a nearby water tower that’s gravity-fed to the hideaway. “So far, we’ve got half the summer booked,” Wolfe said. Visitors have come to stay from Spokane, Wenatchee and Seattle.

Like her other two tiny houses, the hobbit hole didn’t include a kitchen, but Wolfe is planning a communal, pub-style kitchen in the future for her “Hobbit Inn” village, along with two other hobbit-hole getaways. The first is themed as if a hobbit woodworker lived there; the second will be more feminine and themed for a beekeeper, complete with hives. The third will be the hobbit hole of an adventurer, filled with books and maps. Each will comfortably accommodate a couple.

For now, guests either bring a cooler and camp stove for their meals, or head out to eat in Chelan, about 20 minutes away.

Wolfe is 33, “which is the same age that hobbits come of age,” she notes.

Though she likes the Tolkien stories, it was her two brothers who were obsessed with the Lord of the Rings. That’s come in handy, “whenever I need to fact-check something,” she said. True fans will find authentic little touches.

And a special event will occur in June – not an eleventy-first birthday party, like the fateful one celebrated by Bilbo Baggins, but something perhaps even more extraordinary: The giant Idaho potato truck, back out on the road, will pay a visit to the hobbit hole, or at least its vicinity. The truck is scheduled for a stop in downtown Chelan on June 29.

Source: http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/boise/2016/jun/02/boise-tiny-house-entrepreneurs-hobbit-hole-near-chelan-hit-airbnb/

Hobbit houses in France ( Des maisons de Hobbit en France)

I will see myself well in this cabin with outdoor shower … Fancy sunshine for a hot holiday…(or any time)

Uruguay (to France +)

par asht à 08:13

Précédent Suivant

Catherine has cracked on this kind of house and asks me for information First a small gallery of these houses worthy of Tolkien, be careful they will be fashionable before Christmas because Bilbo will go out to the movies.

ici :

Hobbit house

:

Hobbit House, New Zealand - So Cute !
ou encore ici :

(et enfin :) finally here

kaleidoscopeyeez: whhhhhhhhaaaaaaaAAaaAAAAAAAaaat

So, first choose his version: buried or not, then a good architect not too conventional and wanting to embark on the adventure I advise him to go for a walk here in France. Or to spend a night there: The “desired” Cachette between Paris and Reims The “desired” cache The “desired” cache I also recommend the site of Simon Dale, a specialist I hope I have answered and hope that she will keep me informed of the next events.

Or to spend a night there: (Ou de passer une nuit:)

La Cachette
between Paris and Reims (entre Paris et Reims)

La Cachette

La Cachette I also recommend the site of Simon Dale, a specialist (le site de Simon Dale, grand spécialiste)


I hope I have answered and hope that she will keep me informed of the next events.

Source: http://prenonsletemps.canalblog.com/archives/2012/11/08/25528245.html

THE HOBBIT SHIRE

Sheep have taken over the Shire!

On picturesque private farmland near Matamata on the North Island of New Zealand, I visited the remnants of the original Hobbiton movie set from “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy.

In September 1998 Peter Jackson and New Line Cinema discovered the Alexander family farm during an aerial search for suitable film sites for “The Lord of the Rings”. The fantastic views and rolling country side of the Alexander Farm closely resembled that of Middle-earth as described by author, J.R.R Tolkien.

The large established pine tree, later re-named the party tree, was already perfectly placed in front of the lake. The surrounding rolling farmland was untouched by 20th century clutter such as roads, buildings or power lines. The farm was perfect.

Site construction started in March 1999. Initially this involved heavy earthmoving machinery provided by the New Zealand Army. Total site construction took nine months. Throughout construction and filming all activity on the site was kept under strict security due to commercial restraints by the movie company.

Filming commenced in December 1999 and continued for three months. At its peak 400 people were working on site, including director Peter Jackson, and actors Sir Ian McKellen (Gandalf), Elijah Wood (Frodo), Sir Ian Holm (Bilbo), Sean Astin (Sam), Billy Boyd (Pippin) and Dominic Monaghan (Merry).

After filming on the site was completed heavy rain stopped the dismantling of the set, leaving about half the hobbit homes in place. New Line Cinema canceled plans for removing the remaining set and granted permission to the Alexander family to allow public access which has resulted in thousands of visitors each year since 2004.

The set has been rebuilt for the fillming of “The Hobbit”, which began late in 2010.

The film’s story here:

 
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Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-12-03T12:27:44+00:00America/Los_Angeles12bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 03 Dec 2018 12:27:44 +0000 31, in brunch, coffee, entertainment

 

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