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Everything You Wanted To Know About Brunch But Were Afraid To Ask

Everything You Wanted To Know About Brunch But Were Afraid To Ask
Everything you wanted to know

honestlyyum.com/

23 fascinating facts about brunch!

Brunch is a combination of breakfast and lunch eaten usually during the late morning, but it can extend to as late as 3pm.

Let’s see some interesting facts about it!

1. The word is a portmanteau of breakfast and lunch.

2. Brunch originated in England in the late 19th century and became popular in the United States in the 1930s.

3. The 1896 supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary cites Punch magazine which wrote that the term was coined in Britain in 1895 to describe a Sunday meal for “Saturday-night carousers” in the writer Guy Beringer’s article “Brunch: A Plea” in Hunter’s Weekly’

“Instead of England’s early Sunday dinner, a post church ordeal of heavy meats and savory pies, why not a new meal, served around noon, that starts with tea or coffee, marmalade and other breakfast fixtures before moving along to the heavier fare? By eliminating the need to get up early on Sunday, brunch would make life brighter for Saturday-night carousers. It would promote human happiness in other ways as well. “Brunch is cheerful, sociable and inciting.” Beringer wrote. “It is talk-compelling. It puts you in a good temper, it makes you satisfied with yourself and your fellow beings, it sweeps away the worries and cobwebs of the week.”

— William Grimes, “At Brunch, The More Bizarre The Better” New York Times, 1998

4. It is sometimes credited to reporter Frank Ward O’Malley who wrote for the New York newspaper The Sun from 1906 until 1919,[8] allegedly based on the typical mid-day eating habits of a newspaper reporter.

5. Some colleges and hostels serve brunch. Such brunches are often serve-yourself buffets, but menu-ordered meals may be available instead of, or with, the buffet.

6. The meal usually involves standard breakfast foods such as eggs, sausages, bacon, ham, fruits, pastries, pancakes, scones, and the like.

7. The United States military often serves weekend brunch in the dining facilities. They offer both breakfast and lunch options and are open from about 09:00-13:00 (though times vary).

8. The dim sum brunch is popular in Chinese restaurants worldwide. It consists of a variety of stuffed buns, dumplings, and other savory or sweet food items that have been steamed, deep-fried, or baked. Customers pick small portions from passing carts, as the kitchen continuously produces and sends out more freshly prepared dishes.

9. Dim sum is usually eaten at a mid-morning, midday, or mid-afternoon teatime.

10. Brunch is prepared by restaurants and hotels for special occasions, such as weddings, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, or Easter Sunday.

11. The Office québécois de la langue française accepts “brunch” as a valid word but also provides a synonym déjeuner-buffet. Note that, however, in Quebec, déjeuner alone (even without the qualifying adjective petit) means “breakfast”.

12. In Quebec, the word—when Francized—is pronounced.

13. German-speaking countries readily adopt Anglicisms, and “brunch” is no exception, defining it as “a combination of breakfast and lunch.”

14. Chinese word “早午饭” is defined as brunch, “早饭” means breakfast and “午饭” means lunch in Chinese. The combination of “早饭” and “午饭” is “早午饭”, as known as brunch.

15. ‘Friday Brunch’ is considered something of an institution in Dubai. Many large hotels and restaurants offer an all inclusive drinks and food buffet during early afternoons, and large groups of expatriates and tourists make this the highlight of their weekend, with parties going on well into the night.

16. In many regions of Canada, in particular in Southern Ontario, brunch is popular on Sundays when families will often host relatives or friends in their dining room.

17. The typical brunch can last a few hours and go late into the afternoon. Montreal-style bagels may be served alongside egg dishes, waffles or crepes, smoked meat or fish, fruit, salads, cheese, and dessert. Often, champagne or wine will be served and following the meal tea or coffee is usually consumed.

18. Many restaurants offer brunch service as well, and the Leslieville neighborhood of Toronto is sometimes called the brunch capital of Toronto as many renowned establishments serve brunch in that neighborhood.

19. In Canada, brunch is served in private homes using homemade foods and in restaurants. In both cases, brunch typically consists of the same dishes as would be standard in an American brunch, namely coffee, tea, fruit juices, breakfast foods including pancakes, waffles, and french toast; meats such as ham, bacon and sausages; egg dishes such as scrambled eggs, omelettes and Eggs Benedict; bread products such as toast, bagels or croissants; pastries or cakes such as cinnamon rolls or coffee cake; and fresh, cut fruit pieces or fruit salad. Brunches may also include foods not typically associated with breakfast, such as roasted meats, quiche, soup, smoked salmon and salads such as Cobb salad.

20. When served in a private home or a restaurant, a brunch may be served buffet style, in which trays of foods and beverages are available and guests can serve themselves and select the items they want, often in an “all-you-can-eat” fashion.

21. Restaurant brunches may also be served from a menu, in which guests select specific items which are served to them by the waitstaff.

22. Restaurant brunch meals range from relatively inexpensive brunches available at diners and family restaurants to expensive brunches served at high-end restaurants and bistros.

23. In South Africa, brunch is a favorite activity for many families. It is globally-distinctive in that only pancakes and fruit are consumed.

Source:  https://www.uselessdaily.com/food/useless-trivia-23-fascinating-facts-about-brunch/

How brunch became the most delicious—and divisive—meal in America


By Roberto A. Ferdman and Christopher Ingraham

Almost 120 years ago, long before anyone waited in line to feast on eggs benedict and French toast, the word brunch appeared in print for the first time in the United States. “The latest ‘fad’ is to issue invitations for a meal called ‘brunch…a repast at 11 o’clock a.m.,” a column in the New Oxford, an old Pennsylvania newspaper, explained in 1896. Originally conceived for the wealthy as a drawn-out, elaborate affair, brunch, like a runny egg, soon dribbled out into the mainstream.

By 1939, The New York Times declared Sunday a two-meal day. By the 1960s, brunch’s popularity gave rise to specific cookbooks, and by the 1990s, Americans started brunching on Saturdays too.

Now, brunch has become more popular than ever. The story of brunch is the story of changing patterns in how Americans eat, live and interact. But brunch hasn’t swept the entire country just yet. When you dig into the data, you can see that brunch is far more popular in some regions of this country and among some demographics than others.

http://www.washingtonpost.com

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2017 in breakfast, brunch

 

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Gingerbread Pancakes

Gingerbread Pancakes

Grandma's Gingerbread Pancakes

Grandma’s Gingerbread Pancakes

Ingredients

Directions

  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Whisk the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, ginger, and cinnamon in a bowl; set aside. Beat the egg in a separate mixing bowl with the vanilla and molasses until smooth. Whisk in the water until completely incorporated. Stir the flour mixture into the molasses mixture until just combined — a few lumps are okay.
  2. Heat a lightly oiled griddle over medium-high heat. Drop batter by large spoonfuls onto the griddle, and cook until bubbles form and the edges are dry. Flip, and cook until browned on the other side. Repeat with remaining batter.

Footnotes

  • Tip
  • Aluminum foil helps keep food moist, ensures it cooks evenly, keeps leftovers fresh, and makes clean-up easy.

    Source: http://allrecipes.com

     
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    Posted by on December 11, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, music

     

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    James Van Der Beek’s ‘Famous’ Mung Bean Pancake Recipe 

    James Van Der Beek’s ‘Famous’ Mung Bean Pancake Recipe 

    James David Van Der Beek is an American actor. He is best known for his portrayal of Dawson Leery in the WB series Dawson’s Creek. (wikipedia.org) 

    When you’re jet lagged in James Van Der Beek‘s household, pancakes are just the solution for an easy breakfast.

    After flying home from London, the Dawson’s Creek alum got to work in the kitchen on Sunday, whipping up what he calls his “famous pancake recipe” on his Instagram story — and even got a little help from his adorable kids.

    James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

    “And try to ignore the chaos,” he says as he zooms over to his daughter Annabel, 3, crying about a very serious coloring matter.

    James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

    James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

    He says to set the griddle to 250 degrees, pour the mixture on and flip when they bubble.

    The 40-year-old revealed his “secret ingredient” for his flapjacks is mung beans, which he boils with rice before before blending and adding to classic pancake batter.

    “It’s what you make dal out of,” Van Der Beek says, referring to the traditional Indian stew that uses the beans.

    James Van Der Beek/SnapChat

    “And try to ignore the chaos,” he says as he zooms over to his daughter Annabel, 3, crying about a very serious coloring matter.

    The actor also has a smart tip for prepping the ingredient: “When you boil the mung beans, the shells come off so you kinda just pick them out like that and that’s how you deshell them.”

    Van Der Beek’s son Joshua, 5, then makes a cute cameo as he was put to work on stirring duty, mixing up the rest of the ingredients.


    James Van Der Beek’s Mung Bean Pancakes

    ¼ cup mung beans, rinsed
    ¼ cup rice, rinsed
    Chopped dates
    3 eggs
    3 tbsp. coconut oil
    3 cups pancake mix
    1 palmful cinnamon

    1. In a saucepan, boil beans and rice in 1 cup water until tender. Transfer the mixture to the blender, add dates and puree until smooth.

    2. Stir together the remaining ingredients with 2 1/4 cups water, then whisk in the mung bean puree.

    3. Heat a griddle to 250° and ladle the batter into circles. When the tops start to bubble, flip the pancakes and cook on the other side.

    Source: http://people.com/food/james-van-der-beek-mung-bean-pancake-recipe/

     
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    Posted by on December 11, 2017 in breakfast, brunch

     

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    PANCAKES WITH BENEFITS

    PANCAKES WITH BENEFITS

    This Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup tastes just like maple syrup, except it’s sugar freelow carb, and only 2 calories per tablespoon!  Perfect for topping pancakeswafflesoatmeal, yogurt, and more…  the possibilities are endless!

    (How to Make Maple Syrup) This Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup tastes just like pure maple syrup, except it's sugar free, low carb, and only 2 calories per tablespoon! Perfect for topping pancakes, waffles, oatmeal, yogurt, and more! Healthy Dessert Recipes with sugar free, low fat, high protein, gluten free, and vegan options at the Desserts With Benefits Blog (www.DessertsWithBenefits.com)

    I’m the kind of person who likes to have dessert on a daily basis.  It’s all I think about, breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  I just want dessert.  PLEASE, GIVE ME DESSERT AND NO ONE GETS HURT!

    Almost every night last week, I was struck with a serious craving for pancakes.  And, as a true Canadian, the only way I can eat pancakes is with maple syrup (of course).  I douse it alllll over my pancakes.

    While I love pure maple syrup — it’s wholesome, all natural, and even good for you (in moderation) — it’s still sugar.

    (How to Make Maple Syrup) This Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup tastes just like pure maple syrup, except it's sugar free, low carb, and only 2 calories per tablespoon! Perfect for topping pancakes, waffles, oatmeal, yogurt, and more! Healthy Dessert Recipes with sugar free, low fat, high protein, gluten free, and vegan options at the Desserts With Benefits Blog (www.DessertsWithBenefits.com)

    And, all that sugar before bedtime doesn’t sit well with me.  Sugar makes me suuuper hyper (no one wants to see that…), so it makes it difficult for me to fall asleep.

    So, I made a solution — Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup!

    (How to Make Maple Syrup) This Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup tastes just like pure maple syrup, except it's sugar free, low carb, and only 2 calories per tablespoon! Perfect for topping pancakes, waffles, oatmeal, yogurt, and more! Healthy Dessert Recipes with sugar free, low fat, high protein, gluten free, and vegan options at the Desserts With Benefits Blog (www.DessertsWithBenefits.com)

    Yeah, I know this didn’t come pouring out of a maple tree, but just like pure maple syrup, this DIY version is all natural, fat free, gluten free, and vegan.  It’s the perfect substitute for those who are also avoiding excess sugar, such as diabetics or those entering fitness competitions.

    This Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup tastes like pure maple syrup, just without the excess calories, carbs, and sugar.  Soooo, what does that mean?

    PANCAKES FOR DINNER!!!

    Let’s all indulge in those beloved pancakes that we crave so much.

    Another reason why I love this DIY Maple Syrup is because it’s great to pour over single-serving microwave cakes, and even ice cream.  It’s even good when added to smoothies.  This is a much better option than the sugar-free syrups on the market nowadays, which are filled with aspartame, artificial Splenda, artificial food coloring, artificial flavoring, and preservatives.  No one wants that crap on their pancakes or in their body.  Nope.  I’d rather have my HEALTHY Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup which is sweetened with organic stevia extract instead of high-calorie white sugar or empty-calorie high-fructose corn syrup.

    This Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup is something you can feel good about serving  😉

    (How to Make Maple Syrup) This Healthy Homemade Sugar Free Maple Syrup tastes just like pure maple syrup, except it's sugar free, low carb, and only 2 calories per tablespoon! Perfect for topping pancakes, waffles, oatmeal, yogurt, and more! Healthy Dessert Recipes with sugar free, low fat, high protein, gluten free, and vegan options at the Desserts With Benefits Blog (www.DessertsWithBenefits.com)

    3¼ CUPS

    HEALTHY HOMEMADE SUGAR FREE MAPLE SYRUP

    prep time: 5 MINUTES

    cook time: 0 MINUTES

    total time: 5 MINUTES

    INGREDIENTS:

    3 cups Water2 tbs Natural Maple Flavor**1¾ tsp of Vanilla Creme-Flavored Stevia Extract1 tsp Xanthan Gum⅛ tsp Salt

    DIRECTIONS:

    In a large blender (I used my Vitamix), add the water, maple flavor, and stevia. Blend on low speed.While the blender is running, remove the lid and slowly add the xanthan gum and salt. Once everything is incorporated and completely smooth, pour into pretty serving jars, tightly seal, and refrigerate overnight.  Ready to use the next day!  Refrigerate to store, and shake before using.

    NOTES:

    **I’ve made this recipe for YEARS with mixed results, because it really all comes down to the maple flavoring.  I used to use Frontier, but it seems like they altered their recipe because their current maple flavor tastes NOTHING like maple.  Now I use Olive Nation.  So beware, if your bottle doesn’t smell like real deal maple syrup, then this syrup sure won’t TASTE like maple syrup.  Smell your maple flavoring before you use it (take it from me)!  If you find another brand you like, be sure to let me know!  I’m disappointed in Frontier’s new recipe 🙁

    All images and text ©Desserts with Benefits.

    Source: https://dessertswithbenefits.com/healthy-homemade-maple-syrup/

     
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    Posted by on December 11, 2017 in breakfast

     

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    Unbelievable Coffee Spas in Japan

    I love hot springs (“onsen” in Japanese). I might even consider visiting onsens a hobby of mine. Yet for some reason I completely forgot that I went to this weird (in a good way)amusement park onsenin Hakone, Japan. In addition to your standard Japanese hot spring, they also had a coffee onsen, a green tea onsen, and a wine onsen. I don’t recommend drinking any of it, but as a bath it was pretty awesome to experience. Japan definitely embraces its onsen culture.coffee_bathCoffee doesn’t come from the ground so how do they get it into the bath water you ask? They make coffee in a pot and pour it in!
    coffee_bath 


    Here is the Green Tea onsen. I’m sure kids drink it all the time…clearly forgetting that the water is actually full of bacteria (bleh).  



    Aaah, the Wine onsen. Seems like these wine loving ladies are enjoying it quite a bit! 
    wine_bath 



    I heard they now have a “Ramen noodle onsen.” I hope this spa in Hakone never stops being weird! And to any of you, if you are curious about this spot (and have a chance to travel to Japan), the onsen is only about an hour train ride from Tokyo. Give a whirl, but remember – don’t drink it!&

    Pictures: YunessunJapanprobe

    Source:  http://en.ilovecoffee.jp/posts/view/38

     
    2 Comments

    Posted by on December 11, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, coffee, entertainment

     

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    JAPANESE-STYLE PANCAKES 

    JAPANESE-STYLE PANCAKES 

    JAPANESE SOUFFLE PANCAKES

    BY KIRBIE

    Japanese Souffle Pancakes

    These Japanese-style Souffle Pancakes are incredibly light and fluffy. They are a popular trend in Japan, but you can recreate them in your own home.

    As you may recall, during my trip to Tokyo, I had the most incredibly fluffy souffle pancakes at Gram Cafe. I’ve been wanting to recreate them ever since.

    souffle-pancakes-6-1
    I tried quite a few recipes I came across on the internet and while they tasted delicious, they didn’t quite taste like the ones I had at Gram.

    After about a dozen attempts, I think this is as close as I can get until they share their recipe.

    japanese-souffle-pancakes-30

    These do take more effort than your regular classic buttermilk pancakes, but they are a fun treat. 

    The pancakes are cooked in a skillet just like regular pancakes but the batter involves a meringue, which is what makes these so much lighter.

    japanese-souffle-pancakes-40

    I’m sharing all my findings below so that you can successfully make these delicious hotcakes on your first attempt.

    japanese-souffle-pancakes-prep-collage(1)

    I’m actually sharing two versions. Here are the differences.

    VERSION 1: USING BAKING POWDER

    Pros: Nearly all the recipes I found use baking powder. The baking powder almost guarantees that your pancakes will rise high and helps create a more stable structure. Of the two, this is the easier recipe. They taste quite good, like fluffy little cakes.

    Cons: I didn’t think these tasted as much like the version I had in Japan. I found that the baking powder changed the texture of the souffle pancakes, making them more cake-like. While fluffy, they aren’t quite as light and don’t “jiggle” the way the ones in Japan do. (If you look up videos of the ones in Japan, people love filming videos of the cakes jiggling.)

    VERSION 2: WITHOUT BAKING POWDER

    Pros: For me, this one tastes most like Grame Cafe’s version. It is even lighter than cake and tastes more like souffle. Souffle traditionally doesn’t use any baking powder and neither does Japanese souffle cheesecake. 

    When I ate the version at Gram Cafe, they had a similar texture to Japanese Souffle Cheesecake, so I think this is closer to the original recipe.

    Cons: The flavor of these might not be for everyone as it does have an eggier taste. Japanese tend to like these not as sweet. I know eggy might sound unappetizing, but a hot souffle usually is quite eggy unless masked with other flavors. 

    However, once you mix it with the syrup and whipped cream, it masks most of that eggy taste.

    It is also a little trickier to make these, especially if you don’t have a lot of experience with making meringues or souffles. If your timing is off and you flip these too soon, they will deflate and collapse.

    OTHER NOTES

    • I used these English Muffin Rings which helps to make these uniform and also helps them achieve a better height as they cook up instead of spreading out.

    • I have seen people make them free form, they just likely won’t be as round and may not rise as high. If you do make them free form, I suggest that you keep them small, so that the batter doesn’t spread out too much.
    •                                                   These are best eaten hot and right away. It’s not really something you can make ahead of time. Once cold, the texture changes and they aren’t as fluffy.
    •                                                     Make sure you sift the cake flour into the batter, otherwise it will make the batter too heavy. If you don’t have a flour sifter, a fine mesh strainer works just as well and is what I used.
    •                                                           You want to use chilled egg whites as it will keep your meringue more stable.
    •                                                    Adding a little water to “steam” the cakes helps them achieve their texture and rise.

    JAPANESE SOUFFLE PANCAKES

    This is a homemade version of the popular Japanese Souffle Pancakes. They are incredibly fluffy and light.

    PRINT RECIPE

    INGREDIENTS:

    VERSION 1: WITH BAKING POWDER

    • 6 tbsp cake flour
    • 2 1/2 tbsp milk
    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1/2 tbsp full fat mayonnaise or kewpie mayonnaise (this is the Japanese mayonnaise)
    • 3 tbsp granulated white sugar
    • 2 large eggs, egg whites and egg yolks separated (keep egg whites chilled in fridge until ready to use)

    VERSION 2: WITHOUT BAKING POWDER

    • 5 tbsp cake flour
    • 1 1/2 tbsp milk
    • 1 tbsp butter, melted
    • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
    • 2 1/2 tbsp granulated white sugar
    • 2 large eggs, egg whites and egg yolks separated (keep egg whites chilled in fridge until ready to use)
    • 1/4 tsp cream of tarta

    DIRECTIONS:

    VERSION 1

    In a medium bowl, add milk, baking powder, vanilla, mayonnaise and egg yolks. Sift in cake flour using a flour sifter or fine mesh strainer (make sure you don’t skip this!). Mix with a whisk until batter is smooth and mixture is a pale yellow.


    In the bowl of a stand mixer, add chilled egg whites and sugar. Make sure your mixing bowl and whisk attachment are completely clean and dry. If there is any oil, your egg whites won’t turn into meringue. Whip on the highest speed your mixer allows, until stiff peaks form. (About 2-3 minutes.) Your meringue should be able to hold its form and if you turn the mixing bowl upside down, the meringue will not slide out.


    Using a spatula, scoop out one third of the meringue and add to your egg yolk batter. Gently fold the meringue into the batter until there are no more white streaks. Make sure you start your folds from the bottom, so that the batter at the bottom of the bowl doesn’t go unmixed. You need to be gentle when folding. If you mix too hard, the meringue will lose its structure. Once the meringue has been incorporated, add in another third. Fold in. And then the final third. At the end, you batter should be very light and airy, with the meringue only just incorporated to the point where there are not visible white streaks.


    If this is your first time making these, you may want to start with just one as a test, to determine the heat setting for your stove and how long to cook the pancakes. But the directions I am sharing is for how I would normally cook these. Add two ring molds to a large skillet. Spray the insides of the ring molds with cooking oil spray. I found that this is the best method to grease, as it completely greases the interior of the molds and also the bottom where the pancakes will be, but doesn’t spread grease to the rest of the parts of the pan you won’t be using.


    Bring your skillet to low heat. It may take a test one to figure out where exactly you want your heat setting. For me, I turned my dial to heat setting 4 (with 10 being the highest) on my gas stove top. Once the oil and pan are hot, fill each ring mold between 1/2 to 2/3 full with batter, allowing some room for them to rise. Add 1/2 tbsp of water to each side of the pan (preferably not touching the pancakes). Close the lid and allow to cook about 3-4 minutes.


    Your pancakes are ready to flip when the tops look almost completely cooked and you can move the bottom of the pancakes without batter spilling out. Use a spatula or turner to flip the pancakes (while still in their molds). I prefer to use a cookie spatula because they are thinner and slip under the molds easier.


    Cover and cook for another 2-3 minutes until pancakes are completely cooked and golden brown on both top and bottom. 
    Place pancakes onto plate. Gently push out of the molds to remove from molds. Repeat with remaining batter. Serve warm with syrup, powdered sugar, whipped cream, fruit, or other toppings of your choice.


    VERSION 2

    In a medium bowl, add milk, melted butter, vanilla, and egg yolks. Sift in cake flour using a flour sifter or fine mesh strainer (make sure you don’t skip this!). Mix with a whisk until batter is smooth and mixture is a pale yellow.


    In the bowl of a stand mixer, add chilled egg whites, sugar and cream of tartar. I don’t recommend skipping the tartar as it really helps to keep the egg whites stable so that the souffles don’t collapse. Make sure your mixing bowl and whisk attachment are completely clean and dry. If there is any oil, your egg whites won’t turn into meringue. Whip on the highest speed your mixer allows, until stiff peaks form. (About 2-3 minutes.) Your meringue should be able to hold its form and if you turn the mixing bowl upside down, the meringue will not slide out.


    Using a spatula, scoop out one third of the meringue and add to your egg yolk batter. Gently fold the meringue into the batter until there are no more white streaks. Make sure you start your folds from the bottom, so that the batter at the bottom of the bowl doesn’t go unmixed. You need to be gentle when folding. If you mix too hard, the meringue will lose its structure. Once the meringue has been incorporated, add in another third. Fold in. And then the final third. At the end, you batter should be very light and airy, with the meringue only just incorporated to the point where there are not visible white streaks.


    If this is your first time making these, you may want to start with just one as a test, to determine the heat setting for your stove and how long to cook the pancakes. But the directions I am sharing is for how I would normally cook these. Add two ring molds to a large skillet. Spray the insides of the ring molds with cooking oil spray. I found that this is the best method to grease, as it completely greases the interior of the molds and also the bottom where the pancakes will be, but doesn’t spread grease to the rest of the parts of the pan you won’t be using.


    Bring your skillet to low heat. It may take a test one to figure out where exactly you want your heat setting. For me, I turned my dial to heat setting 4 (with 10 being the highest) on my gas stove top. Once the oil and pan are hot, fill each ring mold between 1/2 to 2/3 full with batter, allowing some room for them to rise. Add 1/2 tbsp of water to each side of the pan (preferably not touching the pancakes). Close the lid and allow to cook about 4-5 minutes.
    Your pancakes are ready to flip when the surface looks completely cooked. The cakes will rise quite high (possible past the rim of the molds), but they will start to collapse slightly once you remove the lid and let out some of the heat. Be careful not to try to flip these too soon because they will collapse and will stay collapsed. Use a spatula or turner to flip the pancakes (while still in their molds). If you have batter spilling out when you flip these, then they are not ready to be flipped and will likely collapse. I prefer to use a cookie spatula because they are thinner and slip under the molds easier.


    Cover and cook for another 3-4 minutes until pancakes are completely cooked and golden brown on both top and bottom. Place pancakes onto plate. Gently push out of the molds to remove from molds. Repeat with remaining batter. Serve warm with syrup, powdered sugar, whipped cream, fruit, or other toppings of your choice.


    I used these English Muffin Rings
    Some of the product links contained in this post are affiliate links. Much like referral codes, this means I earn a small commission if you purchase a product I referred (at no extra charge to you).

    .
    Source: https://kirbiecravings.com/

     
    4 Comments

    Posted by on December 4, 2017 in breakfast, brunch

     

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    Coffee And More… Japanese Spas

    Soak in Wine, Green Tea, Coffee or Sake at Yunessun Spa Resort


    Bathing in water is such old school. At Yunessun Spa Resort in Hakone, Japan, you can soak yourself in a variety of unorthodox liquids such as green tea, coffee, wine and sake, all in the name of health and well being. Each of the different pools has different health benefits, so they say. For instance, a sake bath has the potential to remove freckles and age spots, while green tea picked from the mountains of Tanzawa and Hakone, can boost skin health and the immune system. Bathing in wine is considered rejuvenating for the body, and it has been said that the Queen of Egypt, Cleopatra, frequently did it. Yunessun has a few more traditional spas as well, including a couple of themed baths such as one resembling an ancient Roman bath.

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    A 3.6 m wine bottle lies by the side of an outdoor pool filled with red wine. Red wine contains resveratol, an antioxidant that protects the skin from environmental damage, so fresh red wine is poured into the pool daily. While soaking in wine, bathers also enjoy a drink or two. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

    Although wine spas are available all over the world, Yunessun Spa Resort is probably the largest one, and the only resort to offer a variety of ingredients to choose from. Also available at Yunessun is chocolate bath and salt water bath so thick with salt that bathers can float on them, just like the Dead Sea.

    Like Yunessun’s unorthodox offerings, other spas around the world too offer strange beauty treatments, like the Crude Oil Spas in Azerbaijan, snail massage spas in South America, South Korea and parts of Russia, and a Israeli spa that offers massage from snakes.

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    Photo credit: Getty Images

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    Photo credit: Getty Images

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    Photo credit: Getty Images

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    Photo credit: Getty Images

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    A 2m-tall teapot sits above a small outdoor pool filled with tea grown in Japan’s Tanzawa and Hakone mountains. Green tea contains antioxidants called catechins that protect cells and keep skin looking younger. The tea spa is kept hot at around 42 degree Centigrade. Photo credit

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    Coffee is brewed with water from natural hot springs in Hakone, and fresh batches are poured in periodically throughout the day. The caffeine in the coffee works to reduce the appearance of skin puffiness and cellulite. Photo credit

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    An oversized cask drips fresh sake into a pool, where bathers can benefit from the famous Japanese rice wine’s kojic acids, which work to decrease the appearance of age and sun spots. Photo credit

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    The God’s Aegean Sea, their biggest pool composed of three islands with relaxing spa waters and a variety of water massaging devices. Photo credit

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    Two resort employees demonstrate the buoyancy of guests in the Dead Sea spa. Photo credit: Getty Images

    Hakone Kowakien Yunessun / BBC

    Sources: http://www.amusingplanet.com/2014/09/soak-in-wine-green-tea-coffee-or-sake.html?m=1

     
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    Posted by on December 4, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, entertainment

     

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