Category Archives: blues

“Ann Peebles – I Can’t Stand The Rain (1973)”


I Can’t Stand the Rain” is a song originally recorded by Ann Peebles in 1973, and written by Peebles, Don Bryant, and Bernard “Bernie” Miller. Other hit versions were later recorded by Eruption and Tina Turner.

Ann Peebles version

The song was written by Peebles, her partner (and later husband) Don Bryant, and DJ Bernard “Bernie” Miller in 1973:

One evening in Memphis in 1973, soul singer Ann Peebles was meeting friends, including her partner, Hi Records staff writer Don Bryant, to go to a concert. Just as they were about to set off, the heavens opened and Peebles snapped: “I can’t stand the rain.” As a professional songwriter in constant need of new material, Bryant was used to plucking resonant phrases out of the air and he liked the idea of reacting against recent R&B hits that celebrated bad weather, such as the Dramatics’ “In the Rain” and Love Unlimited’s “Walking in the Rain (With the One I Love)”. So he sat down at the piano and started riffing on the theme, weaving in ideas from Peebles and local DJ Bernie Miller. The song was finished that night and presented the next morning to Hi’s studio maestro, Willie Mitchell, who used a brand new gadget, the electric timbale, to create the song’s distinctive raindrop riff. It really was that easy. “We didn’t go to the concert,” Bryant remembers. “We forgot about the concert.”[1]

Ann Peebles said: “At first, we had the timbales all the way through the song but as we played the tape, Willie Mitchell said ‘what about if the timbales were in front before anything else comes in?’. So we did that and when we listened back I said ‘I love it, let’s do that’.”[2]

Produced by Willie Mitchell, the song became Peebles’ biggest hit when, in 1973, it reached #38 on the US Pop Chart and #6 on the R&B/Black Chart; it also reached #41 on the UK singles chart in April 1974. The organ is played by Charles Hodges.[3] It was one of John Lennon’s favorite songs and in a Billboard magazine article he commented, “It’s the best song ever.” Ian Dury chose this song as one of his eight songs when he appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs.[4]


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“Joe Cocker – Cry Me A River”

Mad Dogs & Englishmen is a live album by Joe Cocker released in 1970. The album’s title is drawn from the 1931 Noël Coward song of the same name. Only four songs of the 16 on the original album were drawn from his first two studio albums. Besides the contributions of bandmate and musical director Leon Russell, it draws equally from rock (the Rolling Stones, Traffic, Bob Dylan, the Beatles) and soul (Ray Charles, Sam and Dave, Otis Redding). Accompanying Cocker is a choir, a three-piece horn section and several drummers.

The single “The Letter”/”Space Captain”, recorded during rehearsals was released to coincide with the tour. The album yielded the single “Cry Me a River“/”Give Peace a Chance.”

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Posted by on March 3, 2018 in blues, male vocalist


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“Charlie Musselwhite – Blue Steel” 

Charles Douglas “Charlie” Musselwhite (born January 31, 1944) is an American electric blues harmonica player and bandleader,[1] one of the non-black bluesmen who came to prominence in the early 1960s, along with Mike Bloomfield and Paul Butterfield, or bands such as Canned Heat. Though he has often been identified as a “white bluesman”,[2][3] he claims Native American heritage. Musselwhite was reportedly the inspiration for the character played by Dan Aykroyd in the Blues Brothers.[4]

Musselwhite was born in Kosciusko, Mississippi. He has said that he is of Choctaw descent, born in a region originally inhabited by the Choctaw. In a 2005 interview, he said his mother had told him he was actually Cherokee.[5] His family considered it natural to play music. His father played guitar and harmonica, his mother played piano, and a relative was a one-man band.

At the age of three, Musselwhite moved to Memphis, Tennessee. When he was a teenager, Memphis experienced the period when rockabilly, western swing, and electric blues and other forms of African-American music were combining to give birth to rock and roll. That period featured Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and lesser-known musicians such as Gus Cannon, Furry Lewis, Will Shade, and Johnny Burnette. Musselwhite supported himself by digging ditches, laying concrete and running moonshine in a 1950 Lincoln automobile. This environment was a school for music as well as life for Musselwhite, who eventually acquired the nickname Memphis Charlie.[6]

In true bluesman fashion, Musselwhite then took off in search of the rumored “big-paying factory jobs” up the “Hillbilly Highway”, Highway 51 to Chicago, where he continued his education on the South Side, making the acquaintance of even more legends, including Lew Soloff, Muddy Waters, Junior Wells, Sonny Boy Williamson, Buddy Guy, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter, and Big Walter Horton. Musselwhite immersed himself completely in the musical life, living in the basement of and occasionally working at Jazz Record Mart (the record store operated by Delmark Records founder Bob Koester) with Big Joe Williams and working as a driver for an exterminator, which allowed him to observe what was happening around the city’s clubs and bars. He spent his time hanging out at the Jazz Record Mart, at the corner of State and Grand, and a nearby bar, Mr. Joe’s, with the city’s blues musicians, and sitting in with Williams and others in the clubs, playing for tips. There he forged a lifelong friendship with John Lee Hooker; though Hooker lived in Detroit, Michigan, the two often visited each other, and Hooker served as best man at Musselwhite’s third marriage. Gradually Musselwhite became well known around town.

In time, Musselwhite led his own blues band, and after Elektra Records‘ success with Paul Butterfield, he released the legendary album Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Band in 1966 on Vanguard Records to immediate and great success.[3][7] He took advantage of the clout this album gave him to move to San Francisco, where, instead of being one of many competing blues acts, he held court as the king of the blues in the exploding countercultural music scene, an exotic and gritty figure to the flower children. Musselwhite even convinced Hooker to move to California.

Since then, Musselwhite has released over 20 albums and has been a guest performer on albums by many other musicians, such as Bonnie Raitt‘s Longing in Their Hearts and the Blind Boys of Alabama‘s Spirit of the Century, both winners of Grammy awards. He also performed on Tom Waits‘s Mule Variations and INXS‘s Suicide Blonde. He has won 14 W. C. Handy Awards, has been nominated for six Grammy awards. received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Monterey Blues Festival and the San Javier Jazz Festival, in San Javier, Spain, and received the Mississippi Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

In 1979, Musselwhite recorded The Harmonica According to Charlie Musselwhite in London for Kicking Mule Records, intended to accompany an instructional book; the album became so popular that it was released on CD. In June 2008, Blind Pig Records reissued the album on 180-gram vinyl with new cover art.[8]


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“Janis Joplin – Kosmic Blues (subtitulado en español)” 

Kozmic Blues” is a song from Janis Joplin‘s I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! album, her first after departing Big Brother and the Holding Company. It was a part of Joplin’s set at Woodstock Festival in 1969. Although the concert as a whole is not regarded as Joplin at her best, that specific performance became very popular and was released on The Essential Janis Joplin.


Posted by on February 23, 2018 in blues, music



“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

“Ray Charles – I Got A Woman” 

I Got a Woman” (originally titled “I’ve Got a Woman“) is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray CharlesAtlantic Records released the song as a single in December 1954, with “Come Back Baby” as the B-side. Both songs later appeared on the 1957 album Ray Charles(subsequently reissued as Hallelujah I Love Her So).

The song was recorded in late 1954 in the Atlanta studios of Georgia Tech radio station WGST. It was a hit—Charles’ first—climbing quickly to #1 R&B in January 1955.[3] Charles told the Pop Chronicles that he performed this song for about a year before he recorded it on November 18, 1954.[4]The song would lead to more hits for Charles during this period when he was with Atlantic. It was later ranked No. 239 on Rolling Stones list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, one of Charles’ five songs on the list.[5] A re-recorded version by Ray Charles, entitled “I Gotta Woman” (ABC-Paramount10649) reached No. 79 on the Billboardpop chart in 1965.[6]


Posted by on February 22, 2018 in 1950s, 1960s, blues, classic music, music


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“B.B. KING – MY HUMMINGBIRD (Don’t Fly Away)”

Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American blues singer, electric guitarist, songwriter, and record producer. King introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later electric blues guitarists.[2]
Indianola Mississippi Seeds is B. B. King’s eighteenth studio album. It was released on October 1970 on ABC Records on LP and May 1989 on MCA Records on CD. On this album B. B. King mixed elements of blues and rock music. Producer Bill Szymczyk decided to follow up on the success of the hit “The Thrill Is Gone” by matching King with a musical all-star cast. The result was one of King’s most critically acclaimed albums and one of the most highly regarded blues crossover albums of all time.

The album appeared on several of Billboard’s album charts in 1970, reaching number 26 on the Pop album chart, number seven on the Jazz album chart and eight on Billboard’s listing for “Black Albums.” The album also generated several hit singles, “Chains and Things”, King’s own “Ask Me No Questions” and Leon Russell’s “Hummingbird”.

King himself, also, views the album as one of his greatest achievements. When asked about his best work, King has said, “I know the critics always mention Live & Well or Live at the Regal, but I think that Indianola Mississippi Seeds was the best album that I’ve done artistically.”[1]


Posted by on February 22, 2018 in 1970s, black music artists, blues





“Let It Go” is a song by English singer-songwriter James Bay.It was released in Europe on 15 September 2014 through Republic Records as the first single from Bay’s second extended play of the same name. It was included on Bay’s debut studio album Chaos and the Calm (2015). The song was written by Bay with Paul Barry and produced by Jacquire King. The Let It Go EP was released prior on 3 May 2014.

The song was re-released in March 2015 after the success of “Hold Back the River” and on July 2015, has peaked at number 10 on the UK Singles Chart, beating its previous peak of 62 on 27 September 2014.[1] “Let It Go” has proven to be a big success in Oceania, where, in May 2015, it peaked at number 8 in Australia, whilst in New Zealand, the song debuted on June 15, 2015 at number 31, before climbing to number 24 the following week. A week after that the song entered the top 10 of the chart, peaking at number 10. “Let It Go” is Bay’s first song to chart on the Billboard Hot 100, reaching number 16.


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