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Category Archives: blues

 “Honky Tonk” 

“Honky Tonk” is rhythm and blues instrumental written by Billy ButlerBill Doggett, Clifford Scott and Shep Shepherd. Doggett recorded it as a two-part single in 1956.[1] It peaked at number two for three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100,[2] and was the biggest R&B hit of the year, spending thirteen non-consecutive weeks at the top-of-the charts.[3][4]   

Honky Tonk” became Doggett’s signature piece and an R&B standard recorded by many other performers. 

Cornell Hurd Band on “Boonville – Live in Mendocino County” (2015)


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Posted by on May 12, 2017 in blues

 

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Hawaii Jazz and Blues Festival 

 

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 “Bourbon Street Blues” 

Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an Italian-American singer, actor, songwriter, bandleader, and trumpeter. While rooted in New Orleans jazz, swing music, and jump blues, Prima touched on various genres throughout his career: he formed a seven-piece New Orleans-style jazz band in the late 1920s, fronted a swing combo in the 1930s and a big band group in the 1940s, helped to popularize jump blues in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s, and performed as a Vegaslounge act in the late 1950s and 1960s.

From the 1940s through the 1960s, his music further encompassed early R&B and rock’n’rollboogie-woogie, and even Italian folk music, such as the tarantella. Prima made prominent use of Italian music and language in his songs, blending elements of his Italian identity with jazz and swing music. At a time when “ethnic” musicians were often discouraged from openly stressing their ethnicity, Prima’s conspicuous embrace of his Italian ethnicity opened the doors for other Italian-American and “ethnic” American musicians to display their ethnic roots.[1][2]

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“Zaz – Je veux/I want  (Studio version, HD)” 

Isabelle Geffroy[1] (born 1 May 1980 in Tours, France), better known by the nickname Zaz, is a French singer-songwriter who mixes jazzy stylesFrench varietysoul and acoustic. She is famous for her hit “Je veux”, from her first album, Zaz, released on 10 May 2010.[2]She has sold over 3.4 million albums worldwide and is currently one of the most successful French singers in the world.

In 2001, she started her singing career in the blues band “Fifty Fingers”. She sang in musical groups in Angoulême, especially in a jazz quintet.[4] She became one of the four singers of Izar-Adatz (Basque for “Shooting Star”), a variety band which consisted of sixteen people with whom she toured for two years, especially in the Midi-Pyrenees and the Basque Country. She worked in the studio as a backing singer in Toulouse and performed with many singers, including Maeso, Art Mengo, Vladimir Max, Jean-Pierre Mader, Eduardo Sanguinetti, the latinoamerican philosopher and land-artist,[5] and Serge Guerao.

In 2011, Zaz won an EBBA Award. Every year the European Border Breakers Awards EBBA recognize the success of ten emerging artists or groups who reached audiences outside their own countries with their first internationally released album in the past year.

In May 2010, French magazine Télérama announced: “Rumor has swelled in recent weeks: Zaz is an extraordinary voice, and she will be the revelation of the summer!”.[6] On 10 May 2010, Zaz released her first album. It contains songs she wrote (“Trop sensible”) and co-composed (“Les passants”, “Le long de la route”, “Prends garde à ta langue”, “J’aime à nouveau”, “Ni oui ni non”). Kerredine Soltani produced the album on the label “Play On” and wrote and composed the hit single “Je veux”. The pop singer Raphaël Haroche wrote her songs “Éblouie par la nuit”, “Port Coton” and “La fée”. In 2010, she signed a contract for her tours with Caramba and publisher Sony ATV. She was invited to make several television appearances (such as Taratata or Chabada) and was featured in several programs on the radio. On Sunday 6 October 2013, Zaz appeared on BBC One‘s The Andrew Marr Show in London and sang “Je veux” live.

Zaz then toured France (Paris, La Rochelle, MontaubanSaint-Ouen, Chateauroux, LanderneauFécamp…), performed at the Francofolies of Montreal (Canada), and sang in Monthey (Switzerland), Brussels, Berlin, and Milan. In autumn Zaz topped the charts in Belgium, Switzerland, and Austria. Matthieu Baligand, her manager and producer at Caramba Entertainment, explained to Libération: “We talk a lot of her right now and people are waiting her at the turn… Despite the demand, it seems preferable to do her first tour in fifty small places which will render her credible. Zaz is a popular, intuitive artist, who is familiar with music, who can sing, but doing a quality show is something else (…).” In November 2010, the debut album Zaz became double platinum and she was awarded “Revelation Song” by the Académie Charles Cros. Zaz also won the European Border Breakers Award: she was named the French artist most played abroad in 2010. According to a survey published by L’Internaute, Zaz was the most popular French singer in the 2010 ranking.[7]

She is also featured on the song “Coeur Volant” for the soundtrack of the 2011 film, Hugo. Her live CD and DVD Zaz live tour Sans Tsu Tsou was revealed.

Her song “Eblouie Par La Nuit” was featured in the 2013 American neo-noir crime thriller, “Dead Man Down”.

In 2012, Zaz went on tour and held concerts in various countries around the world including Japan, Canada, Germany, Poland, Switzerland, Slovenia, Czech Republic (Colours of Ostrava), Croatia, Bulgaria, Serbia, and Turkey, among other countries.[8]

With her album Paris she won the 2015 Echo award for best international female rock/pop artist.[9]

LYRICS IN ENGLISH


I want (Je veux)

Give me a suite at the Ritz hotel, I don’t want that

Chanel’s jewellery, I don’t want that

Give me a limo, what would I do with it?

Offer me staff, what would I do with it?

A mansion in Neufchatel, it’s not for me

Offer me the Eiffel tower, what would I do with it?

 

I want love, joy, good spirit

It’s not your money that will make me happy

I want to die with a hand on my heart

Let’s go together, let’s discover my freedom,

Forget all your prejudice, welcome to my reality

 

I’m fed up with your good manners, it’s too much for me

I eat with my hands, I’m like that

I speak loud and I’m direct, sorry

Let’s end the hypocrisy, I’m out of it

I’m tired of double-talks

Look at me, I’m not even mad at you, I’m just like that

 

I want love, joy, good spirit

It’s not your money that will make me happy

I want to die with a hand on my heart

Let’s go together, let’s discover my freedom,

Forget all your prejudice, welcome to my reality

 
 

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“Charlie Musselwhite – Blue Steel” 

Charles Douglas “Charlie” Musselwhite (born January 31, 1944) is an American electric blues harmonica player and bandleader,[1] one of the non-black bluesmen who came to prominence in the early 1960s, along with Mike Bloomfield and Paul Butterfield, or bands such as Canned Heat. Though he has often been identified as a “white bluesman”,[2][3] he claims Native American heritage. Musselwhite was reportedly the inspiration for the character played by Dan Aykroyd in the Blues Brothers.[4]

Musselwhite was born in Kosciusko, Mississippi. He has said that he is of Choctaw descent, born in a region originally inhabited by the Choctaw. In a 2005 interview, he said his mother had told him he was actually Cherokee.[5] His family considered it natural to play music. His father played guitar and harmonica, his mother played piano, and a relative was a one-man band.

At the age of three, Musselwhite moved to Memphis, Tennessee. When he was a teenager, Memphis experienced the period when rockabillywestern swing, and electric blues and other forms of African-American music were combining to give birth to rock and roll. That period featured Elvis PresleyJerry Lee LewisJohnny Cash, and lesser-known musicians such as Gus CannonFurry LewisWill Shade, and Johnny Burnette. Musselwhite supported himself by digging ditches, laying concrete and running moonshine in a 1950 Lincoln automobile. This environment was a school for music as well as life for Musselwhite, who eventually acquired the nickname Memphis Charlie.[6]

In true bluesman fashion, Musselwhite then took off in search of the rumored “big-paying factory jobs” up the “Hillbilly Highway”, Highway 51 to Chicago, where he continued his education on the South Side, making the acquaintance of even more legends, including Lew SoloffMuddy WatersJunior WellsSonny Boy WilliamsonBuddy GuyHowlin’ WolfLittle Walter, and Big Walter Horton. Musselwhite immersed himself completely in the musical life, living in the basement of and occasionally working at Jazz Record Mart (the record store operated by Delmark Records founder Bob Koester) with Big Joe Williams and working as a driver for an exterminator, which allowed him to observe what was happening around the city’s clubs and bars. He spent his time hanging out at the Jazz Record Mart, at the corner of State and Grand, and a nearby bar, Mr. Joe’s, with the city’s blues musicians, and sitting in with Williams and others in the clubs, playing for tips. There he forged a lifelong friendship with John Lee Hooker; though Hooker lived in Detroit, Michigan, the two often visited each other, and Hooker served as best man at Musselwhite’s third marriage. Gradually Musselwhite became well known around town.

In time, Musselwhite led his own blues band, and after Elektra Records‘ success with Paul Butterfield, he released the legendary album Stand Back! Here Comes Charley Musselwhite’s Southside Band in 1966 on Vanguard Records to immediate and great success.[3][7] He took advantage of the clout this album gave him to move to San Francisco, where, instead of being one of many competing blues acts, he held court as the king of the blues in the exploding countercultural music scene, an exotic and gritty figure to the flower children. Musselwhite even convinced Hooker to move to California.

Since then, Musselwhite has released over 20 albums and has been a guest performer on albums by many other musicians, such as Bonnie Raitt‘s Longing in Their Hearts and the Blind Boys of Alabama‘s Spirit of the Century, both winners of Grammy awards. He also performed on Tom Waits‘s Mule Variations and INXS‘s Suicide Blonde. He has won 14 W. C. Handy Awards, has been nominated for six Grammy awards. received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Monterey Blues Festival and the San Javier Jazz Festival, in San Javier, Spain, and received the Mississippi Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

In 1979, Musselwhite recorded The Harmonica According to Charlie Musselwhite in London for Kicking Mule Records, intended to accompany an instructional book; the album became so popular that it was released on CD. In June 2008, Blind Pig Records reissued the album on 180-gram vinyl with new cover art.[8]

 

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“B.B. KING – MY HUMMINGBIRD (Don’t Fly Away)”


Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American blues singer, electric guitarist, songwriter, and record producer. King introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later electric blues guitarists.[2]
Indianola Mississippi Seeds is B. B. King’s eighteenth studio album. It was released on October 1970 on ABC Records on LP and May 1989 on MCA Records on CD. On this album B. B. King mixed elements of blues and rock music. Producer Bill Szymczyk decided to follow up on the success of the hit “The Thrill Is Gone” by matching King with a musical all-star cast. The result was one of King’s most critically acclaimed albums and one of the most highly regarded blues crossover albums of all time.

The album appeared on several of Billboard’s album charts in 1970, reaching number 26 on the Pop album chart, number seven on the Jazz album chart and eight on Billboard’s listing for “Black Albums.” The album also generated several hit singles, “Chains and Things”, King’s own “Ask Me No Questions” and Leon Russell’s “Hummingbird”.

King himself, also, views the album as one of his greatest achievements. When asked about his best work, King has said, “I know the critics always mention Live & Well or Live at the Regal, but I think that Indianola Mississippi Seeds was the best album that I’ve done artistically.”[1]

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Posted by on April 21, 2017 in 1970s, black music artists, blues

 

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 Ray Charles “Busted”

“Busted” is a song covered by Johnny Cash (with The Carter Family) for Cash’s 1963 album Blood, Sweat and Tears. “Busted” was written by Harlan Howard in 1962, and has been covered by several notable artists, including Ray Charles (also in 1963) and Patty Loveless (2009).

The song is about a dirt-poor farmer struggling to support his family, bemoaning a stack of bills, his family’s needs, animals that won’t produce and land that is barren. He even tries to ask his brother for assistance, but his brother was actually going to come to him for help. Finally, he admits he’s going to pack up his family and leave to find a better life.

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Posted by on April 17, 2017 in blues, r&b

 

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