RSS

Category Archives: blues

George Thorogood & The Destroyers – Bad To The Bone”

Bad to the Bone is the fifth studio album by American Blues-Rock band George Thorogood& The Destroyers. It was released in 1982 by the label EMI America Records and contains their best known song, “Bad to the Bone“. The album also features The Rolling Stones side-man Ian Stewart on keyboards. A special edition of this album was released in 2007 to mark the 25th anniversary of the album’s original release.

source

 
2 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-09T09:51:59+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 09 Jul 2018 09:51:59 +0000 31, in 1980s, blues, r&b, rock

 

Tags: ,

Sammie Jay – original song Killing Me Slowly

busking talent, street performance, voice, lyrics, music …oh wow!
When this amazing Barefoot Street Performer started singing, no one expected that! Sammie Jay blew away online audience with her busking talent, street performance, voice, lyrics, music and her original song Killing Me Slowly, However, audience were too busy shopping to stop and properly enjoy her beautiful voice and Amazing song from one of the top street performers in London. Many compare her style to Janis Joplin or Joss Stone. Some conspiracy theorists even believe that was shot against a Green Screen! :-)

Enjoy this amazing busking talent, original song and beautiful music. Where is Simon Cowell when he is needed !! or The Voice. YouTube.com

 
7 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-08T10:31:34+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 08 Jul 2018 10:31:34 +0000 31, in blues, female vocalist, pop music, reflections

 

Tags: ,

“AUDRA MAE Blues In The Night” 

“AUDRA MAE Blues In The Night” 

Audra Mae is an American singer and songwriter from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, born on February 20, 1984. She is the great-great-niece of Judy Garland, and a great granddaughter of Garland’s sister Jimmie.
Blues in the Night” is a popular bluessong which has become a pop standardand is generally considered to be part of the Great American Songbook. The music was written by Harold Arlen, the lyrics by Johnny Mercer, for a 1941 film begun with the working title Hot Nocturne, but finally released as Blues in the Night. The song is sung in the film by William Gillespie.

Arlen and Mercer wrote the entire score for the 1941 film Blues in the Night. One requirement was for a blues song to be sung in a jail cell. As usual with Mercer, the composer wrote the music first, then Mercer wrote the words. Arlen said,

The whole thing just poured out. And I knew in my guts, without even thinking what Johnny would write for a lyric, that this was strong, strong, strong! When Mercer wrote “Blues in the Night”, I went over his lyric and I started to hum it over his desk. It sounded marvelous once I got to the second stanza but that first twelve was weak tea. On the third or fourth page of his work sheets I saw some lines—one of them was “My momma done tol’ me, when I was in knee pants.” I said, “Why don’t you try that?” It was one of the very few times I’ve ever suggested anything like that to John.[citation needed]

When they finished writing the song, Mercer called a friend, singer Margaret Whiting, and asked if they could come over and play it for her. She suggested they come later because she had dinner guests—Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland, Mel Tormé, and Martha Raye. Instead, Arlen and Mercer went right over. Margaret Whiting remembered what happened then:

They came in the back door, sat down at the piano and played the score of “Blues in the Night”. I remember forever the reaction. Mel got up and said, “I can’t believe it.” Martha couldn’t say a word. Mickey Rooney said, “That’s the greatest thing I’ve ever heard.” Judy Garland said, “Play it again.” We had them play it seven times. Judy and I ran to the piano to see who was going to learn it first. It was a lovely night.

Wikipedia.org

 
4 Comments

Posted by on SunAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-07-08T09:50:59+00:00America/Los_Angeles07bAmerica/Los_AngelesSun, 08 Jul 2018 09:50:59 +0000 31, in blues, female vocalist

 

Tags: ,

… GRACE KELLY

… GRACE KELLY

At 24, but already 10 years into her career, saxophonist, vocalist, composer, and New York Local 802 member Grace Kelly is moving past the label “prodigy” and defining her voice as a jazz musician.

http://www.afm.org/

 
2 Comments

Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-22T11:15:54+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 22 Jun 2018 11:15:54 +0000 31, in blues, jazz

 

Tags:

“B.B. KING – THE THRILL IS GONE”

null

“The Thrill Is Gone”is a slow minor-key blues song in B minor written by West coast blues musician Roy Hawkins and Rick Darnell in 1951. Hawkins’ recording of the song reached number six in the Billboard R&B chart in 1951.[1] In 1970, “The Thrill Is Gone” became a major hit for B.B. King. Subsequently, many blues and other artists have recorded their interpretations of the song.

B.B. King version

B.B. King recorded his version of “The Thrill Is Gone” in June 1969 for his album Completely Well, released the same year. King’s version is a slow twelve-bar blues notated in the key of B minor in 4/4 time.[2] The song’s polished production and use of strings marked a departure from both the original song and King’s previous material. When released as a single in December 1969, the song became one of the biggest hits of King’s career, appearing in the R&B chart at number three and the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart at number fifteen[3] and became one of his signature songs.

B.B. King’s recording earned him a Grammy Award for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance in 1970 and a Grammy Hall of Fame award in 1998. King’s version of the song was also placed at number 183 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. Memorable live versions of the song were included on King’s albums Live in Cook County Jail (1971), Bobby Bland and B.B. King Together Again…Live (1976), and Live at San Quentin (1991).[4]

en.m.wikipedia.org

 
15 Comments

Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-21T12:06:49+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 21 Jun 2018 12:06:49 +0000 31, in 1970s, American music artists, black music artists, blues, classic music, entertainment, music

 

Tags: ,

“You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine”

image

Louis Allen “Lou” Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006) was an American recording artist, voice actor, songwriter, and record producer. He is best known for his singing ability: Frank Sinatra once said that Rawls had “the classiest singing and silkiest chops in the singing game”.[1] Rawls released more than 60 albums, sold more than 40 million records,[2] and had numerous charting singles, most notably his song “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine”. He worked as a television, motion picture, and voice actor. He was also a three-time Grammy-winner, all for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance.

Career

Rawls was born in Chicago on December 1, 1933, and raised by his grandmother in the Ida B. Wells projects on the city’s South Side. He began singing in the Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church choir at the age of seven and later sang with local groups through which he met future music stars Sam Cooke, who was nearly three years older than Rawls, and Curtis Mayfield.[3]

After graduating from Chicago’s Dunbar Vocational High School, he sang briefly with Cooke in the Teenage Kings of Harmony, a local gospel group, and then with the Holy Wonders. In 1951, Rawls replaced Cooke in the Highway QC’s after Cooke departed to join The Soul Stirrers in Los Angeles. Rawls was soon recruited by the Chosen Gospel Singers and moved to Los Angeles, where he subsequently joined the Pilgrim Travelers.[4]

In 1955, Rawls enlisted in the United States Army as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He left the “All-Americans” three years later as a sergeant and rejoined the Pilgrim Travelers (then known as the Travelers). In 1958, while touring the South with the Travelers and Sam Cooke, Rawls was in a serious car crash. Rawls was pronounced dead before arriving at the hospital, where he stayed in a coma for five and a half days. It took him months to regain his memory, and a year to fully recuperate. Rawls considered the event to be life-changing.[4]

Alongside Dick Clark as master of ceremonies, Rawls was recovered enough by 1959 to be able to perform at the Hollywood Bowl. He was signed to Capitol Records in 1962, the same year he sang the soulful background vocals on the Sam Cooke recording of “Bring It On Home to Me” and “That’s Where It’s At,” both written by Cooke. Rawls himself charted with a cover of “Bring It On Home to Me” in 1970 (with the title shortened to “Bring It On Home”).

Rawls’ first Capitol solo release was Stormy Monday (a.k.a. I’d Rather Drink Muddy Water), a jazz album with Les McCann in 1962. The next two Capitol releases did well and used Onzy Matthews as the musical director along with a 17-piece big band; both these albums (Black and Blue, Tobacco Road) charted with Billboard and helped to propel him into the national spotlight as a recording artist.

Though his 1966 album Live! went gold, Rawls would not have a star-making hit until he made a proper soul album, appropriately named Soulin’, later that same year. The album contained his first R&B #1 single, “Love Is a Hurtin’ Thing”. In 1967 Rawls won his first Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance, for the single “Dead End Street.” In 1967, Rawls also performed at the first evening of the Monterey International Pop Music Festival.[6]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
5 Comments

Posted by on ThuAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-21T09:24:30+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesThu, 21 Jun 2018 09:24:30 +0000 31, in ballad, black music artists, blues, coffee, entertainment, male vocalist, music, r&b, smooth jazz, soul oldies

 

Tags: ,

“Big Jay McNeely – There Is Something On Your Mind” 

“Big Jay McNeely – There Is Something On Your Mind” 

There’s Something on Your Mind (Part 2)” is a 1960 song by Bobby Marchan. The single was Marchan’s most successful release on both the R&B and pop singles chart. “There’s Something on Your Mind” made it to number one on the R&B charts and number thirty-one on the Billboard Hot 100.[1]

The song was originally recorded as “There Is Something on Your Mind” in 1957 by Big Jay McNeely and his band in a small Seattle recording studio, and leased more than a year later to Los Angeles disc jockey Hunter Hancock‘s Swingin’ Records label, where it reached #42 on Billboards pop chart and number 2 on the R&B chart in early 1959. The lead vocalist on this original recording was Little Sonny Warner. Though McNeely is listed as the song’s writer, he has freely admitted that he purchased the song from the Rivingtons‘ vocalist John “Sonny” Harris, who in turn had lifted much of it from a gospel song, “Something on My Mind” by the Highway QCs.

The song has been recorded many times since then by Big Jay McNeelyhimself with various collaborators, along with Freddy FenderB.B. KingAlbert KingEtta JamesGene VincentBaby Lloyd Stallworth (of the Famous Flames), the Jolly Jacks (who parodied the violence of the Marchan recording), and others.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on MonAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-06-18T10:11:33+00:00America/Los_Angeles06bAmerica/Los_AngelesMon, 18 Jun 2018 10:11:33 +0000 31, in blues, r&b

 

Tags: ,

 
%d bloggers like this: