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“REGINA BELLE – THIS IS LOVE”

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Regina Belle (born July 17, 1963) is an American singer–songwriter and actress who first started her career in the mid–1980s. Known for her singles, “Baby Come to Me” (1989) and “Make It Like It Was” (1990), Belle’s most notable for two hit duets, both with Peabo Bryson: “Without You”, the love theme from the comedy film Leonard Part 6, recorded in 1987 and “A Whole New World”, the main theme of the Disney’s animated feature film Aladdin, recorded in 1992, with which Belle and Bryson won the Grammy award. The theme song “Far Longer than Forever” from the animated movie the The Swan Princess, performed with Jeffrey Osborne was nominated for a Golden Globe in 1995 for Best Original Song.[1]

Belle was born in Englewood, New Jersey. It was at Englewood’s Mount Calvary Baptist Church, and then Paterson’s Friendship Baptist Church (presided over by Belle’s uncle, the Reverend Fred Belle), that Belle began attracting attention with her vocal abilities. She sang her first solo in church at age 8. Belle attended Dwight Morrow High School where she studied trombone, tuba and steel drums.[2] After graduation, she studied opera at the Manhattan School of Music. At Rutgers University, she became the first female vocalist with the school’s jazz ensemble. Belle’s musical influences include Phyllis Hyman, Billie Holiday, Shirley Caesar, Patti LaBelle, and Nancy Wilson.[3]

She was introduced to the Manhattans by New York radio DJ Vaughn Harper and began working as their opening act. She recorded the duet “Where Did We Go Wrong” with the group which helped to attract the attention of Columbia Records. They eventually signed her to a record deal.

In 1987, she released her debut album All by Myself. It includes her first hits “So Many Tears” and “Show Me the Way”. In the same year, Belle recorded her first successful duet with Peabo Bryson: the song “Without You”, the love theme from the comedy film Leonard Part 6, also released in 1987. The song was her first single to appear on the Adult Contemporary (chart), peaking at #8 and was also her first single to appear in four charts, including the UK Singles, peaking at #85, her best position in this chart until 1989. Her follow-up album, Stay with Me, released in 1989. Belle recorded a duet in 1991 with Johnny Mathis, “Better Together” which appeared on his album Better Together: The Duet Album. Continuing her tradition of duets, Belle teamed up with Peabo Bryson for four songs: “Without You” (in 1987), “I Can’t Imagine” (in 1991), “A Whole New World” (in 1992) and “Total Praise” (in 2009). [4][5]

Later in 1993, she released her Platinum selling third album, Passion. The album featured the Disney hit, “A Whole New World”.[6] The theme song “Far Longer than Forever” from the animated movie the The Swan Princess, performed with Jeffrey Osborne was nominated for a Golden Globe in 1995 for Best Original Song.[1] She released Reachin’ Back in 1995 followed by Believe in Me in 1998.

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“AT LAST” + Lyrics ETTA JAMES – Original Version:

“AT LAST” + Lyrics ETTA JAMES – Original Version:

“AT LAST” + Lyrics ETTA JAMES – Original Version:

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Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins; January 25, 1938 – January 20, 2012) was an American singer. Her style spanned a variety of music genres including blues, R&B, soul, rock and roll, jazz and gospel. Starting her career in 1954, she gained fame with hits such as “The Wallflower”, “At Last”, “Tell Mama”, “Something’s Got a Hold on Me”, and “I’d Rather Go Blind” for which she wrote the lyrics. She faced a number of personal problems, including drug addiction, before making a musical resurgence in the late 1980s with the album Seven Year Itch.

James is regarded as having bridged the gap between rhythm and blues and rock and roll, and was the winner of six Grammys and 17 Blues Music Awards. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, the Blues Hall of Fame in 2001, and the Grammy Hall of Fame in both 1999 and 2008. Rolling Stone ranked James number 22 on their list of the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time and number 62 on the list of the 100 Greatest Artists.

 

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PUT ON YOUR HI-HEEL SNEAKERS – Tommy Tucker

PUT ON YOUR HI-HEEL SNEAKERS – Tommy Tucker

“Hi-Heel Sneakers” (often also spelled “High Heel Sneakers”) is a blues song recorded by Tommy Tucker in 1963. The song, an uptempo twelve-bar blues, “has a spare, lilting musical framework” with a strong vocal.[1] Tommy Tucker’s original recording hit number one on the Cash Box R&B Locations chart and number eleven on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] Musicians on the recording included Brenda Jones on bass, Johnny Williams on drums, Weldon Young on guitar, and Robert Higggenbotham on piano and organ.

Over 1000 artists have recorded “Hi-Heel Sneakers”. These include Bill Haley & His Comets, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Ronnie Milsap, The Faces, Sting, Led Zeppelin, Carl Perkins (featured on Johnny Cash’s 35th Anniversary album), Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, Chuck Berry, Stevie Wonder, Paul McCartney, The Searchers (It’s The Searchers album), The McCoys (Hang on Sloopy album), Sammy Davis Jr., Big Brother and the Holding Company,[3] Jose Feliciano, Buddy Guy & Junior Wells, Tom Jones, John Lee Hooker, The American Breed, Cleo Laine, Pharoah Sanders, Jerry Garcia and The Grateful Dead, Phish, Ramsey Lewis, Laura Nyro and George Thorogood. Tucker’s version also features on the John Lennon’s Jukebox LP.

The song, which Tucker penned, has appeared in several soundtracks, for example The Who’s Quadrophenia (1979); the HBO special The Promiseland; motion pictures, e.g. Lion of Africa, Lackawanna Blues, Frankie’s House; commercial jingles and television shows such as Late Night with David Letterman, sitcoms Rags to Riches, Redd Foxx Show; plus at sporting events such as the women’s 1997 NCAA Basketball Championship. In England there is a racehorse named High Heel Sneakers, plus in the Netherlands a musical group uses the name.

The opening line “Put on your red dress, mama—’cause you’re going out tonight” was used in a TV commercial for Fresh Start laundry detergent in the mid-1980s. The commercial’s message was that a woman could be told in the afternoon that she’s going out that night and by using the detergent, her dress would be clean well in time for her night out.

The Oasis song “Get Off Your High Horse Lady”, from the album Dig Out Your Soul, uses the vocal melody and layout of this song.

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Posted by on October 14, 2017 in 1970s, black music artists, r&b

 

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 “Fats Domino – I’m Walking to New Orleans” 

Image credit: Becky Fos, OffBeat Magazine


Antoine “Fats” Domino, Jr. (born February 26, 1928) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. Domino released five gold (million-copy-selling) records before 1955.[1] He also had 35 Top 40 American hits and has a music style based on traditional rhythm and blues ensembles of bass, piano, electric guitar, drums, and saxophone

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Posted by on October 13, 2017 in black music artists, blues

 

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“Vanessa Williams – Save The Best For Last”

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“Save The Best For Last” is a 1992 single written by Phil Galdston, Wendy Waldman and Jon Lind in March 1989. It is considered Vanessa Williams’ signature song. The lyrics’ redemptive themes resonated with Williams’ story, as she had put together a successful recording career following her earlier Miss America resignation scandal. The song is a ballad about a young female admirer of a single man who stands by and watches as the object of her desires goes through years of dating, before he finally unexpectedly decides to initiate a relationship with the singer.

“Save The Best For Last” was not written specifically for Vanessa Williams. There were a number of other singers who were offered the song; they all turned it down. While recording her album The Comfort Zone, at the last minute, a song had to be replaced. Vanessa was played “Save The Best For Last”, and Vanessa said: “I can’t believe nobody wants this song. I have to have this song.”

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“Brenton Wood- Baby you got it”

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Brenton Wood (born Alfred Jesse Smith, July 26, 1941, Shreveport, Louisiana)[1] is an American singer and songwriter known for his two 1967 hit singles, “The Oogum Boogum Song” and “Gimme Little Sign”.

Career

The family moved to San Pedro in Los Angeles, California when Wood was a child. He attended San Pedro High School for part of his freshman year before moving to Compton, where Brenton became a member of the Compton High School track team and received several awards for his athletic achievements.

Following his high school graduation, Wood enrolled in East Los Angeles College. Soon after, he took the stage name Brenton Wood, possibly inspired by the wealthy Los Angeles enclave of Brentwood (some sources state that the name is in honor of his “home county”), with a second possible connection of Bretton Woods. During this period, his musical interests began to manifest themselves. He was inspired by Jesse Belvin and Sam Cooke, and he began cultivating his songwriting skills, also becoming a competent pianist.[1]

Early singles for Brent Records and Wand Records failed to chart. Wood signed with Double Shot Records, and his “The Oogum Boogum Song” reached #19 on the US Billboard R&B chart and #34 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the spring of 1967. In Southern California, “The Oogum Boogum Song” hit the top 10 on KGB-FM and #1 on KHJ. Wood’s biggest hit came a few months later, as “Gimme Little Sign” hit #9 on the pop chart, #19 on the R&B charts, #2 on KHJ, and #8 in the UK Singles Chart;[2] sold over one million copies; and was awarded a gold disc.[1] The title is not actually sung in the song; the chorus instead repeats “Give Me Some Kind of Sign.” Wood’s “Baby You Got It” peaked at #34 on the Hot 100 during the last week of 1967 and #3 on KHJ on 31 January 1968.

Wood recorded a duet with Shirley Goodman. His next song to reach the charts was “Come Softly to Me” in 1977.

He returned again in 1986 with the album Out of the Woodwork,[3] which included contemporary rerecordings of his early hits, along with several new tracks, including the single, “Soothe Me.”[4]

His album This Love Is for Real came out in 2001. Among his later appearances was in 2006 on the Los Angeles public access program Thee Mr. Duran Show, where Wood and his band performed several of his hit singles.[5]

Recently, in 2014, he partnered with William Pilgrim & The All Grows Up for a remake of the song “Gimme Little Sign” on their recently released album, Epic Endings (available on iTunes and Amazon) which came out in August.[6]

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“You Are The First, My Last, My Everything – Barry White”

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“You’re the First, the Last, My Everything” or “You’re the First, My Last, My Everything” is a popular song recorded by Barry White. Written by White, Tony Sepe and Peter Radcliffe and produced by White, “You’re the First, The Last, My Everything” was White’s fourth top ten hit on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, reaching #2; it spent a week at #1 on the Billboard Hot Soul Singles chart.[2] The early disco classic made it to number two on the disco/dance charts.[3] In the UK Singles Chart it fared even better, spending two weeks at the top in December 1974.[4] It appeared on White’s 1974 album Can’t Get Enough.

Radcliffe originally wrote “You’re the First, My Last, My Everything” as a country song with the title “You’re My First, You’re My Last, My In-Between”, which went unrecorded for 21 years. White recorded it as a disco song, keeping most of the structure and about two-third of the title, but he rewrote the lyrics.

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Posted by on September 25, 2017 in black music artists

 

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