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Category Archives: American music artists

“Todd Rundgren – Hello It’s Me (1972)”

Todd Rundgren – Hello It’s Me (1972): https://youtu.be/lLeCB7Kn-VE

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Todd Harry Rundgren (born June 22, 1948) is an American multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and record producer. Hailed in the early stage of his career as a new pop star, supported by the certified gold solo double LP Something/Anything? in 1972,[2] his career has produced a diverse range of recordings, both as a solo artist and as a member of the band Utopia. He has also been prolific as a producer and engineer on the recorded work of other musicians.

During the 1970s and 1980s, Rundgren engineered and/or produced many notable albums for other acts, including Straight Up by Badfinger, Stage Fright by the Band, We’re an American Band by Grand Funk Railroad, Bat Out of Hell by Meat Loaf, New York Dolls by the New York Dolls, and Skylarking by XTC. In the 1980s and 1990s his interest in video and computers led to his “Time Heals” being the eighth video played on MTV, and “Change Myself” was animated by Rundgren on commercially available Amiga computers.

His best-known songs include “Hello It’s Me” and “I Saw the Light”, which have heavy rotation on classic rock radio stations, and “Bang the Drum All Day”, which is featured in many sports arenas, commercials, and movie trailers. Although lesser known, “Couldn’t I Just Tell You” has had a major influence on artists in the power pop musical genre.[4]

 

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“Phillip Phillips – Man On The Moon Lyrics” 


Phillip LaDon Phillips Jr. is an American singer, songwriter and musician who won the eleventh season of American Idol on May 23, 2012. His coronation song, “Home,” released after his win, became the all time best selling song from  American Idol. 

Wikipedia.org

 

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“Lovin’ Spoonful – Daydream”

“Lovin’ Spoonful – Daydream”

The Lovin’ Spoonful is an American rock band, inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000 and well known for a number of hit songs in the 1960s including “Summer in the City”, “Do You Believe In Magic”, “Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind?”, and “Daydream”.

Career

Formation and early years (1964–1965)

The band had its roots in the folk music scene based in the Greenwich Village section of lower Manhattan during the early 1960s. John Sebastian grew up in contact with music and musicians, the son of a much-recorded and technically accomplished classical harmonica player (also named John Sebastian). He had reached maturity toward the end of the American folk music revival that spanned from the 1950s to the early 1960s. Sebastian was joined in the Spoonful by guitarist Zal Yanovsky from a bohemian folk group called The Mugwumps (two other members, Cass Elliot and Denny Doherty, would later form half of the Mamas & the Papas), playing local coffee houses and small clubs. The formation of the Lovin’ Spoonful during this period was later described in the lyrics of the Mamas & the Papas’ 1967 top ten hit, “Creeque Alley”.

Drummer Jan Carl and bassist Steve Boone rounded out the group, but Carl was replaced by drummer-vocalist Joe Butler after the group’s first gig at The Night Owl in Greenwich Village. Butler had previously played with Boone in a group called The Kingsmen (not the hit group of “Louie Louie” fame). The group’s first Night Owl performances were reportedly so bad that the club owner told them to go away and practice, so they practiced in the basement of the nearby Hotel Albert until they had improved enough to draw audience attention.

The group made its first recordings for Elektra Records in early 1965, and agreed in principle to sign a long-term deal with Elektra in exchange for a $10,000 advance. However, Kama Sutra Records had an option to sign the Lovin’ Spoonful as recording artists as part of a previously signed production deal, and Kama Sutra exercised the option upon learning of Elektra’s intent to sign the band. The four tracks recorded for Elektra were released on the 1966 various artists compilation LP What’s Shakin’ after the band’s success on Kama Sutra.

Pop success (1965–1966)
The band worked with producer Erik Jacobsen to release their first single on July 20, 1965, “Do You Believe in Magic”, written by Sebastian. Additionally, they wrote all their own material (aside from a few covers, mostly on their first album),[5][6] including “Younger Girl” (which missed the Hot 100), which was a hit for The Critters in mid-1966.

“Do You Believe in Magic” reached #9 on the Hot 100, and the band followed it up with a series of hit singles and albums throughout 1965 and 1966, all produced by Jacobsen. The Lovin’ Spoonful became known for such folk-flavored pop hits as “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice”, which reached #10, and “Daydream”, which went to #2.[5][7] Other hits included “Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind?” (another #2 hit) and their only song to reach #1 on the Hot 100, “Summer in the City” (13–27 August 1966). Later that year, the #10 hit “Rain on the Roof” and the #8 hit “Nashville Cats” completed the group’s first seven consecutive Hot 100 hits to reach that chart’s top 10. The only other 1960s act to achieve that feat is Gary Lewis & The Playboys.

The Lovin’ Spoonful was one of the most successful pop/rock groups to have jug band and folk roots, and nearly half the songs on their first album were modernized versions of blues standards. Their popularity revived interest in the form, and many subsequent jug bands cite them as an inspiration. The rest of their albums featured mostly original songs, but their jug band roots showed up again and again, particularly in “Daydream” and the lesser-known “Money” (which only reached #48, in 1968), featuring a typewriter as percussion.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Lesley Gore – You Don’t Own Me (1964)”

wpid-images-14.jpeg
wpid-images-11.jpegMARTY LEDERHANDLER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
By JON PARELES
FEBRUARY 16, 2015

Lesley Gore, who was a teenager in the 1960s when she recorded hit songs about heartbreak and resilience that went on to become feminist touchstones,

died on Monday in Manhattan. She was 68. Lois Sasson, her partner of 33 years, said Ms. Gore died of lung cancer at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

en.m.wikipedia.org

 

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Uptown Girl – BILLY JOEL

Uptown Girl – BILLY JOEL


Uptown Girl” is a song written and performed by American musician Billy Joel. It was released on September 29, 1983, on his ninth studio album An Innocent Man (1983). The lyrics describe a working-class “downtown man” attempting to woo a wealthyuptown girl.”
The 12″ EP featured the tracks “My Life“, “Just the Way You Are” and “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me” (catalogue number TA3775),[2] whereas some 7″ single versions featured “Careless Talk” as a B-side (TBC).[3

InspirationEdit

According to an interview with Howard Stern, Joel had originally titled the song “Uptown Girls” and it was conceived on an occasion when he was surrounded by Christie BrinkleyWhitney Houstonand his then-girlfriend Elle Macpherson. According to numerous interviews with Joel, the song was initially written about his relationship with Macpherson, but it ended up also becoming about his soon-to-be wife, Brinkley (both women being two of the most famous supermodels of the 1980s).[4][5]Joel also has said that the song was inspired by the music of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons.

https://youtu.be/nEIcTstEmnQ

 

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“The Oogum Boogum Song (Lyric Video) by Brenton Wood from Oogum Boogum”

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Brenton Wood (born Alfred Jesse Smith, July 26, 1941, Shreveport, Louisiana)[1] is an American singer and songwriter known for his two 1967 hit singles, “The Oogum Boogum Song” and “Gimme Little Sign”.

Career

The family moved to San Pedro in Los Angeles, California when Wood was a child. He attended San Pedro High School for part of his freshman year before moving to Compton, where Brenton became a member of the Compton High School track team and received several awards for his athletic achievements.

Following his high school graduation, Wood enrolled in East Los Angeles College. Soon after, he took the stage name Brenton Wood, possibly inspired by the wealthy Los Angeles enclave of Brentwood (some sources state that the name is in honor of his “home county”), with a second possible connection of Bretton Woods. During this period, his musical interests began to manifest themselves. He was inspired by Jesse Belvin and Sam Cooke, and he began cultivating his songwriting skills, also becoming a competent pianist.[1]

Early singles for Brent Records and Wand Records failed to chart. Wood signed with Double Shot Records, and his “The Oogum Boogum Song” reached #19 on the US Billboard R&B chart and #34 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the spring of 1967. In Southern California, “The Oogum Boogum Song” hit the top 10 on KGB-FM and #1 on KHJ. Wood’s biggest hit came a few months later, as “Gimme Little Sign” hit #9 on the pop chart, #19 on the R&B charts, #2 on KHJ, and #8 in the UK Singles Chart;[2] sold over one million copies; and was awarded a gold disc.[1] The title is not actually sung in the song; the chorus instead repeats “Give Me Some Kind of Sign.” Wood’s “Baby You Got It” peaked at #34 on the Hot 100 during the last week of 1967 and #3 on KHJ on 31 January 1968.

Wood recorded a duet with Shirley Goodman. His next song to reach the charts was “Come Softly to Me” in 1977.

He returned again in 1986 with the album Out of the Woodwork,[3] which included contemporary rerecordings of his early hits, along with several new tracks, including the single, “Soothe Me.”[4]

His album This Love Is for Real came out in 2001. Among his later appearances was in 2006 on the Los Angeles public access program Thee Mr. Duran Show, where Wood and his band performed several of his hit singles.[5]

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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“Led Zeppelin Stairway To Heaven STUDIO VERSION HQ”

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