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Category Archives: American music artists

“CRYSTAL GAYLE – YOU’VE BEEN TALKING IN YOUR SLEEP”

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“Talking in Your Sleep” is a song written by Roger Cook and Bobby Wood, and recorded by American country music artist Crystal Gayle. It was released in January 1978 as the first single from the album When I Dream. The song became a hit on both the country and pop charts in 1978. It peaked at number one on the US Country chart,[2] number eighteen on the US Pop chart and number three at the US Adult Contemporary chart.

In 1977, Gayle achieved international crossover Pop success for the first time with her No. 1 hit “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue”. Following the song’s success, Gayle was recording more Pop and Adult Contemporary-styled Country tunes. This song is one of the first examples of this. “Talking in Your Sleep” was released in early 1978, and was a hit mid-year. The song proved an instant follow-up for Gayle on the Pop charts, being she hadn’t had another Top 40 Pop hit since “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue” the previous year.

“Talking in Your Sleep” was released on Gayle’s major-selling album from that year called When I Dream. Following “Talking in Your Sleep”‘s success as a crossover smash, Gayle only achieved one more Top 40 Pop hit as a solo artist, which came the next year with the song, “Half the Way”.

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LITTLE HELEN – The Richest Girl In The World”

LITTLE HELEN – The Richest Girl In The World”

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Baylor was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma and raised in Los Angeles, where she first performed as a nightclub act. She opened for Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, and B.B. King while still in her teens, and performed in the musical Hair.[1]

In 1967/68 she worked with producer Bobby Sanders releasing two singles The Richest Girl and What About Me Boy as Little Helen for the Soultown label.[2]

In the 1970s she joined hit Broadway musical Hair and followed this period of her career as a session musician for artists that included Captain & Tennille, Les McCann and Chaka Khan. As a member of Side Effect her vocals featured on their third album What You Need, from which “Always There”, a song co-written by Ronnie Laws was a R&B chart success. Later in the 1980s her career would falter as a consequence of drug abuse.[1]

Baylor became sober late in the decade, strengthening her Christian faith and deciding to concentrate her career in gospel music. She released her first gospel recording on Word Records in 1990 and her first five albums all hit the Top Ten of the U.S. Billboard Top Gospel Albums chart, with the most successful being 1995’s The Live Experience, which reached #1 on that chart.[3] The track “Oasis” was very successful in the UK, via Expansion Records and stayed on the Music Week Dance Chart for 14 weeks.[4] Also, the song “Sold Out” (from the album Start All Over) won a Dove Award for Contemporary Gospel Recorded Song of the Year at the 24th GMA Dove Awards in 1993

In July 2011, Baylor announced that she is co-producing a feature film about her life story. The film, A Praying Grandmother:The Helen Baylor Story, will feature accounts that she first shared in the song, “Helen’s Testimony” (Word, 1995) and in her autobiography, No Greater Love: The Helen Baylor Story. Baylor approached award-winning filmmaker Cassandra Hollis to co-produce and direct the film.

Baylor was inducted into the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame in 2000.

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“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie – The Kingsmen (HQ)”

“Louie Louie”

In 1962, while playing a gig at the Pypo Club in Seaside, Oregon, then managed by Al Dardis, the band noticed Rockin’ Robin Roberts’s version of

“Louie Louie”

being played on the jukebox for hours on end. The entire club would get up and dance.Ely convinced the Kingsmen to learn the song, which they played at dances to a great crowd response. Unknown to him, he changed the beat because he misheard it on a jukebox. Ken Chase, host of radio station KISN, formed his own club to capitalize on these dance crazes. Dubbed the “Chase”, the Kingsmen became the club’s house band and Ken Chase became the band’s manager. On April 5, 1963, Chase booked the band an hour-long session at the local Northwestern Inc. studio for the following day. The band had just played a 90-minute

“Louie Louie”

marathon.

Despite the band’s annoyance at having so little time to prepare, on April 6 at 10 am the Kingsmen walked into the three-microphone recording studio. In order to sound like a live performance, Ely was forced to lean back and sing to a microphone suspended from the ceiling. “It was more yelling than singing,” Ely said, “’cause I was trying to be heard over all the instruments.” In addition, he was wearing braces at the time of the performance, further compounding his infamously slurred words. Ely sang the beginning of the third verse several bars too early, but realized his mistake and waited for the rest of the band to catch up. In what was thought to be a warm-up, the song was recorded in its first and only take. The Kingsmen were not proud of the version, but their manager liked the rawness of their cover. The B-side was “Haunted Castle”, composed by Ely and Don Gallucci, the new keyboardist. However, Lynn Easton was credited on both the Jerden and Wand releases. The entire session cost $50, and the band split the cost.

“Louie Louie” was kept from the top spot on the charts in late 1963 and early 1964 by the Singing Nun and Bobby Vinton, who monopolized the No.1 slot for four weeks apiece. The Kingsmen single reached No. 1 on the Cashbox chart and No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Additionally in the UK it reached No. 26 on the Record Retailer chart. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

The band attracted nationwide attention when “Louie Louie” was banned by the governor of Indiana, Matthew E. Welsh, also attracting the attention of the FBI because of alleged indecent lyrics in their version of the song. The lyrics were, in fact, innocent, but Ely’s baffling enunciation permitted teenage fans and concerned parents alike to imagine the most scandalous obscenities. All of this attention only made the song more popular. In April 1966 “Louie Louie” was reissued and once again hit the music charts, reaching No. 65 on the Cashbox chart and No. 97 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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“GET CLOSER – Seals and Croft – featuring Carolyn Willis”

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Get Closer is Seals and Crofts’ eighth studio album. The title cut was a top 10 hit in early 1976, reaching #6 on the Pop charts, and #2 AC. It would be their final top 10 hit. “Goodbye Old Buddies” reached #10 on the AC chart as well.

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the group ‘Honey Cone’: Carolyn Willis (left)

The song “Get Closer” features the vocals of Carolyn Willis, who had been in the group Honey Cone.

“Sweet Green Fields” was sampled in the 1997 song “Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See” by Busta Rhymes and later in 2002 by Syleena Johnson on her song “Tonight I’m Gonna Let Go”, which was based on “Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See”.

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“BRENDA AND THE TABULATIONS – IT WAS RIGHT IN THE TIP OF MY TONGUE (AND I FORGOT TO SAY I LOVE YOU)

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Brenda & the Tabulations were an American R&B group formed in 1966 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, originally composed of Brenda Payton, Eddie L. Jackson, Maurice Coates and Jerry Jones.

History

The group had a distinctive, almost doo wop sound, especially at the start, featuring Payton’s sweet occasionally rough-edged vocals with background male harmonies. The line-up changed around 1971 with the original three men departing. Two female backing singers (Pat Mercer and Deborah Martin) were brought in to support Payton.

The group had a series of hit singles in the late 1960s and early 1970s, mainly in the US soul charts and on small independent labels, Dionn and Top & Bottom, operated by the group’s manager, Gilda Woods. However, two were big US pop hits: their first release, “Dry Your Eyes” (Pop #20, R&B #2) on Dionn in 1967 and “Right On The Tip Of My Tongue” (Pop #23, R&B #5) in 1971.[1] The first was written by Payton with group member Maurice Coates and produced by Bob Finiz and the latter written and produced by Van McCoy.

The group signed with Epic/Columbia in 1972 but, despite continuing to work with producer Van McCoy, the four singles released were relatively unsuccessful, with only “One Girl Too Late” managing to chart.

The group released three albums, Dry Your Eyes on Dionn (1967), Brenda and the Tabulations on Top & Bottom (1970), and I Keep Coming Back For More on Chocolate City/Casablanca (1977), although by the time of the last album, Brenda was a solo act while keeping the group name.

Brenda & the Tabulations are one of many recording artists referenced in the song “Life Is a Rock (But the Radio Rolled Me)” by the studio group Reunion.

Brenda Payton, who was born on October 24, 1945, died on June 14, 1992, aged 46. Eddie L. Jackson died on May 3, 2010, from a brain aneurysm at the age of 63.[2]

The group’s music saw a revival in awareness in 2011, when “The Wash” from the Dry Your Eyes album was licensed by Unilever for use in an Axe body wash commercial.

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“Colbie Caillat – Bubbly”

“Colbie Caillat – Bubbly”

Colbie Marie Caillat (i/ˈkoʊlbi kəˈleɪ/; born May 28, 1985) is an American pop singer-songwriter and acoustic guitarist from Malibu, California. She debuted in 2007 with Coco, which included hit singles “Bubbly” and “Realize”. In 2008, she recorded a duet with Jason Mraz, “Lucky”, which won a Grammy. Caillat released her second album, Breakthrough, in August 2009. Breakthrough was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album at the 2010 Grammy Awards. She was also part of the group that won Album of the Year at the 2010 Grammys for her background vocals and writing on Taylor Swift’s Fearless album.

Caillat has sold over 6 million albums worldwide and over 10 million singles. In 2009, she was named Billboard magazine’s 94th-best-selling music artist of the 2000–2009 decade.[1] In 2011, she released her third studio album, All of You. On October 23, 2012 she released her first Christmas album, Christmas in the Sand.

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“Jimmy Ruffin – What Becomes Of The Broken Hearted”

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“What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” is a hit single recorded by Jimmy Ruffin and released on Motown Records’ Soul label in the summer of 1966. It is a ballad, with lead singer Jimmy Ruffin recalling the pain that befalls the brokenhearted, who had love that’s now departed. The song essentially deals with the struggle to overcome sadness while seeking a new relationship after the passing of a loved one.

The tune was written by William Weatherspoon, Paul Riser, and James Dean, and the recording was produced by Weatherspoon and William “Mickey” Stevenson. “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” remains one of the most-revived of Motown’s hits.

Composers Weatherspoon and Riser and lyricist Dean had originally written “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” with the intention of having The Spinners, then an act on Motown’s V.I.P. label, record the tune. Jimmy Ruffin, older brother of Temptations lead singer David Ruffin, persuaded Dean to let him record the song, as its anguished lyric about a man lost in the misery of heartbreak resonated with the singer.

Ruffin’s lead vocal on the recording is augmented by the instrumentation of Motown’s in-house studio band, The Funk Brothers, and the joint backing vocals of Motown session singers The Originals and The Andantes. “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” peaked at number seven on the Billboard Hot 100, and at number six on the Billboard R&B Singles chart. In Britain, it originally reached No. 8, and on reissue in 1974 No. 4, thus making it his highest-placed chart single in the UK.

The song originally featured a spoken introduction by Ruffin, similar in style to many of Lou Rawls’ performances at the time. The spoken verse was removed from the final mix, hence the unusually long instrumental intro on the released version. The spoken verse is present on the alternate mix from the UK 2003 release Jimmy Ruffin – The Ultimate Motown Collection, and as a new stereo extended mix on the 2005 anthology, The Motown Box:

A world filled with love is a wonderful sight. Being in love is one’s heart’s delight. But that look of love isn’t on my face. That enchanted feeling has been replaced.

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