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About America On Coffee

America On Coffee is a blogging network dedicated to the preservation of the U.S.A.'s culture, heritage and traditions. The simple things of life are what we share best. Great coffee, wholesome people, make it all the better. For immediate contact with America On Coffee, leave a 'NOT-TO-BE-PUBLISHED' blog comment or an 'America On Coffee' Facebook page message at: https://m.facebook.com/americaoncoffee/

 “Brazilian Food – a morning at the Municipal Market in Sao Paulo” 

 “Brazilian Food – a morning at the Municipal Market in Sao Paulo” 

There is nothing better than when a local shows you around. I was hesitant about going to Brazil, despite spending so much time in South America I still had apprehensions about safety in Brazil. Moreover, no one had anything nice to say about Sao Paolo and when I said I was going to stay in the city for ten days even Brazilians told me that it was far too long. But they were all wrong. One of my favourite moments in Brazil was sampling typical Brazilian food. It turns out that one of my readers is Angela Goldstein, a food blogger in Sao Paulo and she offered to take me to the Municipal Market (Mercado Municipal) so that we could try two very typical brazilian foods – pastels and of course capirinhas. I had a great day wandering the market looking at all the meat and of course bacon, as well as the fruits that I had never seen before like cashews. I had no idea they were a fruit! Within the Sao Paulo Municipal Market the first floor is used for vendors but if you walk up the stairs you will find a number of restaurants serving alcohol and of course fantastic Brazilian food. But I should warn you to go early because it is a very popular place for both locals and tourists. We arrived at 11am and there was already a line up for the municipal market restaurants. Fortunately the line moved very quickly and we were able to enjoy lunch.

I highly recommend a visit here. Municipal Market/Mercado Municipal Address: R. da Cantareira, 306 – Sé, São Paulo, 01024-000, Brazil

Follow my adventures in food at at http://baconismagic.ca See the photos at: http://www.instagram.com/ay… Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bac… Twitter:http://www.twitter.com/

Finally, subscribe so you don’t miss what I’m eating next! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ayngelina Com

Source: http://viyoutube.com/

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, entertainment

 

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HISTORICAL FACTS – “IS OUR WORLD  WACKED?” (the U.S.A.’s backdoor)

enter U.S.A.’s backdoor

featured image:  ​http://www.cityhallfellows.org/

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2017 in reflections

 

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“Amour A Distance-Cindy Daniel”

Cindy Daniel (born May 6, 1986 in Montreal, Canada) is a Québécois singer.

After her debut album La petite indienne in 2002, the following year, she played the role of Elvira in the French Canadian musical version of Don Juan by Félix Gray. She also appeared on the album released on the occasion.

Signed to the Montreal-based independent record label MP3 Disques established by singer Mario Pelchat, she released two albums with the label, J’avoue in 2006 produced by Mario Pelchat and Le tout premier jour in 2008 also with Pelchat’s participation and the compilation Entre nous… 10 ans déjà! in 2011. She is very well known in the Quebec and French-Canadian public with her 2006 big hit “Sous une pluie d’étoiles” from her album J’avoue charting at top of the local charts. She was nominated for a Felix award nomination in ADISQ 2007. Many renowned artists have written for her including Johnny Hallyday, Jean-Jacques Goldman, Georges Moustaki, Louis Côté and Rick Allison. She has also taken small roles in a number of films.

Personal life
Cindy’s family background are of Indian, Irish and Italian descent. Since December 2006, she is mother of one child.

en.m.wikipedia.org

Amour A Distance

(English translations) LOVE AT A DISTANCE

Even if the distance can break couples,

Y’a that love that will keep us going …
1st couplet:

One day you meet this girl,

His beauty made you crazy,

Cupid I was his arrows,

And he took out his gun,

She lives but you do not care,

You believe in her, she believes in you,

As long as love remains strong,

Nothing separates you,

But at the slightest weakness,

The couple capsized,

Love will float on tears,

Coul’ras like a ship,

For the time being all is well,

You want her more and more,

Until the day you see her,

And you love it even more,

You take pictures of you,

Loving, kisses, grimaces,

You pass from laughter to tears,

Love makes your mask fall,

When she calls or connects you,

You always have something to say,

You could not lie to her,

So you love her to die,

Far from eyes close to the heart,

And you think it hard as a stone,

You engrave his name on walls,

Write it on whole sheets,

Her smile possesses you,

His laughter reasons in your head,

He says “I love you” on sms,

Lol oueii love makes beast
Refrain:

Even if the distance can break couples,

(I trust you)

Y’a that love that will hold us,

(You must keep your promises)

Even if the distance can break couples,

(You trust me)

There is love that will keep us going,

(‘I have to keep my promises)
2nd verse:

A love at a distance,

You lack cklins, lack of kisses,

If you want it’s his presence,

Its perfume makes you crazy,

His eyes miss you,

As if they allowed you to see,

When you get together,

Tears flow when you say goodbye,

Long phone calls,

You spend nights on windows live,

When the atmosphere is too hot,

The heart burns like lava,

Relation pationelle,

Basing on trust,

The slightest obstacle,

Will plunge you into mistrust,

For nothing you take the head,

You become paranoid,

Someone talks to him you hit him,

But you’re surrounded by cats,

Collects cups,

Not the strength to abstain,

What you do not know,

Because she too is lying,

Less and less you talk,

Even the more the desire to see each other,

All these promises, all these dreams,

Have turned to nightmares,

You who believed so strongly,

Give him your heart,

But you did not protect yourself,

And to break your heart.
They had promised never to leave,

(They have forgotten),

What we said was you and me, for eternity,

(Oueiii that is what we say)

We can not stand, all our promises,

( Unfortunately ),

All these I love you, so were not real …

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2017 in FRENCH FRIDAYS

 

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Tahiti’s wild side: More than a honeymoon hotspot

Tahiti’s wild side: More than a honeymoon hotspot

Featured image:https://m.facebook.com/TIB/Athrowback_story_fbi

Tahiti has plenty of action beyond the beach, as Lucy Gillmore discovered.

ft;margin-right:6px;”>By Lucy Gillmore.

                      Hilton resort, Moorea

‘Bora is boring.” With a Gallic shrug, Thibault, the manager of the chic new gourmet restaurant on Moorea, Le Coco’s, dismissed the island that has been enticing honeymooners to its reef-wrapped sands since the first resort was built in 1961.

Bora Bora, a byword for a Garden of Eden tropical paradise, has style in spades, but no substance, apparently. Within its ring of coral reef-fringed resorts time seems to have a dream-like quality as visitors gaze soulfully into each other’s eyes, wander across silken sand, paddle a turquoise sea – and not much else, or at least that was the gist.

Not that I would know. I was bypassing Bora Bora’s romantic torpor for an adventure-packed, culture-laced trip to three other French Polynesian islands: Moorea, Taha’a and that other bucket-list fantasy, Tahiti. French Polynesia’s 118 islands are sprinkled like confetti across an area the size of Europe – 5.5 million square kilometres of ocean – and clustered into five archipelagos: the Society, Tuamotu, Gambier, Marquesas and Austral islands.

Tahiti, Moorea and Taha’a are part of the 14-strong Society archipelago, named by Captain Cook in the 18th century. Now, as then, they tick all the traditional paradise boxes: palm trees, white sand, turquoise water, Finding Nemo on a loop beneath the surface. After crossing half the globe rather more swiftly than Cook, I was greeted at Tahiti airport with a garland of intoxicatingly heady tiare flowers. This is the place that seduced the likes of Paul Gauguin and, more recently, the late Marlon Brando, who bought an atoll, Tetiaroa, after filming Mutiny on the Bounty there in the 1960s. Last year, it opened to guests as The Brando resort.

Tahiti itself, however, is often just the jumping-off point for misty-eyed honeymooners. But, those who bypass it are missing a trick. The rugged, volcanic interior is straight out of Jurassic Park. You can climb to the top of Fautau’a waterfall, cascading 135 metres through a series of basins, or scale Mount Aora’I, a full-day trek around eight hours – or two days if you bed down in the mountain shelter.

I started gently, with a half-day hike through the verdant Orofero Valley. My guide, Herve Maraetaata, was armed with a machete, a bandana on his head, his body covered with intricate tattoos – the story of his life etched across his skin.

Tattoos were banned in 1819, along with dancing, music and the worship of Polynesian gods – those missionaries and settlers were a liberal bunch – however, many of the traditional customs have since been revived.

With his machete, Herve cut walking sticks to help me ford rivers as we tramped and slithered through this isolated valley, the slopes a tangle of thick vegetation, waterfalls rippling through the greenery. Hacking at sugar cane stalks for me to suck, he pointed out coffee bushes, once farmed here, as well as tomatoes, oranges, pineapples and chillis, before digging up a ginger root for me to taste. If you got lost here you could easily survive on fruit – although you might be attacked by wild boar, whose tracks Herve pointed out in the earth.

                           Hiking in the forest

As I scrabbled through the undergrowth he wove tales about his ancestors – the first settlers who arrived here from South-east Asia in large canoes, his grandmother who could diagnose and treat sickness using nature’s pharmacy.

He pointed out the giant roots of a Tree of Life (the banyan tree, or tumu ora in Tahitian) among which mummified bodies were once buried, and the kava plant, the roots of which, when chewed and mixed with saliva, produces a drink with a hallucinogenic effect that was once used in traditional rites. This is a Tahiti, not seen by the cruise ships docking in the capital, Papeete. They come for a whistlestop tour of the island’s colonial heritage and a grass-skirted, cocktail-laced show, ticking off the home of Mutiny on the Bounty author, James Norman Hall, before sailing on.

Hall’s low slung, green wooden house just outside Papeete, is worth a detour, however. Tahiti cast its spell over Hall, who, arriving here in the 1920s to write travel articles, fell in love with, and married a Tahitian woman. They went on to have three children, one of whom was Conrad Hall, the cinematographer who won Oscars for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, American Beauty and Road to Perdition and was nominated for six more. Both men are buried on the hillside behind the house looking out towards Point Venus and Matavai Bay, where Captain Cook observed the Transit of Venus in 1769 and the Bounty memorial marks the place where Captain Bligh dropped anchor in 1788.

Next stop was Moorea, a wind-whipped catamaran ride from Tahiti. Its jagged, mountainous interior delivers another adventure playground, with thundering waterfalls and cliffs to clamber. The island is less developed than Tahiti and home to just 18,000 people; a single road skirts its coast. I was staying at the Hilton Moorea, a string of thatched over-water bungalows spidering out over the lagoon, blacktip sharks circling each night below the walkways attracted by the lights of the resort. Happily, they skulk back beyond the reef during the day, leaving me to snorkel in the lagoon with a Disney-style array of tropical fish, try stand-up paddle-boarding, and helmet diving – walking along the sea bed among sting rays.

Back up on dry land, I made a beeline for Le Coco’s. The island’s first restaurant when it opened 30 years ago, it is now a local legend. In spring this year, the outpost on Moorea was launched, sleek and stone-clad and dishing up owners’ Thiery and Benedict Sauvage’s take on bistronomie – bistro style but with gastronomic flavours – and overseen by Thibault, the Frenchman with a low opinion of Bora Bora, but a high opinion of vanilla from Taha’a.

He recalled that when working at the Mandarin Oriental in Paris, he was once asked to make a pannacotta. The kitchen had Madagascan, Tahitian and Taha’an vanilla. He inhaled the scent from each before choosing – and using all of – the vanilla from Taha’a. The head chef almost fainted – it is the most expensive in the world, costing around €300 (£220) per kilo.

From Moorea, it’s a quick flight to Raiatea, 210km from Tahiti, and then a short boat trip across to Taha’a or “vanilla island” – a mere three kilometres away and the island with which it shares a lagoon. My base was Le Taha’a resort, on a tiny motu (islet). Arriving as the sun set, I sped towards an angry red sky, Bora Bora looming jagged and black on the horizon.

Le Taha’a is the only five-star resort outside Bora Bora other than The Brando. It’s very different in style, however, from Bora Bora’s honeymoon havens. It’s a wild, rather than polished, Polynesian resort.

I wanted to get a taste of the island’s prized produce and headed off to a vanilla plantation. There are just 6,000 people on Taha’a and 500 vanilla farms. The vanilla here has 14 notes – the strongest aroma is aniseed – because it is allowed to dry naturally for up to two weeks before being spread in the sun for a couple of hours and then in a sauna-style box to sweat. By contrast, vanilla from Madagascar has just nine notes.

The vanilla farm is more of a rustic smallholding, the vanilla laid out to dry on tables in a shed in a clearing surrounded by dense vegetation and other crops such as grapefruit and bananas. Handling the long black pods I could smell the heady sweetness. “It’s the second most expensive spice in the world after saffron,” said my guide as I handed over 3,500 Polynesian Francs (around £20) for a mere 100g. “Put a pod in an airtight container with a little rum or vodka in the bottom” was his parting tip.

Taha’s other claim to fame is black pearls. At the farm I visited, I was given a masterclass in cultured pearls (a small piece of grit or shell is placed in a black lip oyster to form the nucleus, then the oyster secretes nacre on the irritant, creating a lustrous pearl).

Jumping back on the boat, with a bag of vanilla pods and pearls, I motored home to my wild, thatched resort and an afternoon of beachcombing, snorkelling in the tepid turquoise water and lazing beneath a palm tree – anything but boring.

Original story; 

http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/ausandpacific/tahitis-wild-side-more-than-a-honeymoon-hotspot-10478588.html?amp

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2017 in entertainment, pacific islands

 

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Jules’ Undersea Lodge

Jules’ Undersea Lodge

Jules’ Undersea Lodge is an American hotel located in Key LargoFlorida and is the only underwater hotel in the United States. It is 30 feet (9 m) deep on the ocean floor and guests have to scubadive to get to their rooms. The hotel is located at the bottom of the Emerald Lagoon and was opened in 1986.[1] The hotel’s name comes from the novelist Jules Verne, author of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Scuba certification is required for entrance as the front door is located 21 feet (6.4 m) under water.

Amenities

Jules’ Undersea Lodge was formerly the La Chalupa Research Laboratory, an undersea marine lab operated off Puerto Rico in the 1970s.[2][3] 

The lodge features a 2 bedroom 1 bath retreat that can be rented for a night. The hotel also offers a scuba diving school.

RESTAURANT 

The dining area of Jules Underwater Lodge

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2017 in entertainment

 

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HOW TO MAKE STUFFED FRENCH TOAST

image:  mccormick.com

https://youtu.be/3G2-2Xx4-7Y

 
 

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“Selena – Dreaming Of You” 

wp-1478956427968.jpeg

Selena Quintanilla was born on April 16, 1971, in Lake Jackson, Texas.[10] She was the youngest child of Marcella Ofelia Quintanilla (née Samora) who had Cherokee ancestry[11] and Abraham Quintanilla, Jr., a Mexican American former musician.[12] Selena was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness.[13] Quintanilla, Jr. noticed her musical abilities when she was six years old. He told People magazine, “Her timing, her pitch were perfect, I could see it from day one”.[14] In 1980 in Lake Jackson, Quintanilla, Jr. opened his first Tex-Mex restaurant, where Selena and her siblings Abraham III (on bass guitar) and Suzette Quintanilla (on drums) would often perform.[14] The following year, the restaurant was forced to close after a recession caused by the 1980s oil glut. The family declared bankruptcy and were evicted from their home.[14][15] They settled in Corpus Christi, Texas; Quintanilla, Jr. became manager of the newly formed band Selena y Los Dinos and began promoting it.[3][14][16] They needed money and played on street corners, at weddings, at quinceañeras, and at fairs.[14][17]

As her popularity as a singer grew, the demands of Selena’s performance and travel schedule began to interfere with her education. Her father took her out of school when she was in the eighth grade.[18] Her teacher Marilyn Greer disapproved of Selena’s musical career.[19] She threatened to report Quintanilla, Jr. to the Texas Board of Education, believing the conditions to which Selena was exposed were inappropriate for a girl her age. Quintanilla, Jr. told Greer to “mind her business”. Other teachers expressed their concerns when they noticed how tired Selena appeared when she arrived at school.[19] At seventeen, Selena earned a high school diploma from the American School of Correspondence in Chicago,[20] and was also accepted at Louisiana State University.[21] She enrolled at Pacific Western University, taking up business administration as her major subject.[22]

Quintanilla, Jr. refurbished an old bus; he named it “Big Bertha” and the family used it as their tour bus.[23] In the first years of touring, the family sang for food and barely had enough money to pay for gasoline.[23] In 1984, Selena recorded her first LP record, Selena y Los Dinos, for Freddie Records.[24] Despite wanting to record English-language songs, Selena recorded Tejano music compositions; a male-dominated, Spanish-language genre[25] with German influences[26] of polka, jazz, and country music, popularized by Mexicans living in the United States.[27] Quintanilla, Jr. believed Selena should record musical compositions related to her heritage.[28] During the recording sessions for the album, Selena had to learn Spanish phonetically with guidance from her father.[29] In 1985, to promote the album, Selena appeared on the Johnny Canales Show, a popular Spanish-language radio program, on which she continued to appear for several years. Selena was discovered by Rick Trevi, founder of the Tejano Music Awards, where she won the Female Vocalist of the Year award in 1987 and for nine consecutive years after.[30] The band was often turned down by Texas music venues because of the members’ ages and because Selena was their lead singer.[31] By 1988, Selena had released five more LP records; Alpha (1986), Munequito de Trapo (1987), And the Winner is… (1987), Preciosa (1988), and Dulce Amor (1988).[32]

en.m wikipedia.org

 
 
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