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Mimicking a romantic language… the borrowed word: “FRENCH” in a culinary dip

05 May
Mimicking a romantic language… the borrowed word: “FRENCH” in a culinary dip

The French onion dip, made of sour cream and instant onion soup was probably created in Los Angeles in 1954, by an unknown cook. The recipe spread quickly and was printed in a local newspaper.[6][5] The Lipton company promoted this mixture on the television show Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts in 1955, and early on, it was known as “Lipton California Dip”, but soon simply as “California Dip” [1]

Lipton advertising campaign promoted it on television and in supermarkets.[7][8] The recipe was added to the Lipton instant onion soup package in 1958.[9] The name “French onion dip” began to be used in the 1960s, and became more popular than “California dip” in the 1990s.[10]

en.m.wikipedia.org. 


FRENCH ONION DIP RECIPE
http://www.allrecipes.com

 INGREDIENTS 

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher 


ABOUT THE FRENCH DIP SANDWICH

In American cuisine, the French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served topped with onions, and a side of au jus (“with juice”), and that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is completely unknown in France itself, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread, rather than an alleged French origin.

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet[1] and Philippe the Original.[1][2] Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home of the Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.[2]

This controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908. However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918.[1]

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

en.m.Wikipedia.Org

THE FRENCH DIP SANDWICH PREPARATION  http://www.thepioneerwoman.com

PREP TIME:
15 Minutes
DIFFICULTY:
Easy
COOK TIME:
1 Hours
SERVINGS:
10 Servings
INGREDIENTS

  • 2 whole Large Onions, Sliced Thin
  • 5 cloves Garlic, Minced
  • 1 whole Packet French Onion Soup Mix (dry)
  • 1 can Beef Consomme
  • 1 cup Beef Broth Or Beef Stock
  • 1/4 cup Dry Sherry Or White Wine (or You May Omit)
  • 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon Soy Sauce
  • 1 cup Water
  • 10 whole Crusty Deli Rolls/sub Rolls, Toasted

    INSTRUCTIONS

    Preheat the oven to 475 degrees. Tie the piece of meat tightly with a couple of pieces of kitchen twine.

    Mix the salt, pepper, oregano and thyme and rub it all over the surface of the beef. Place the beef on a roasting rack in a roasting pan and roast it to medium-rare, about 20 to 25 minutes, until it registers 125 degrees on a meat thermometer. (If you want it less pink, go to 135.) Remove the meat to a cutting board and cover it with foil.

    Return the roasting pan to the stovetop burner over medium-high heat. Add the onions and garlic and stir them around for 5 minutes, until they are soft and golden. Sprinkle in the soup mix, then pour in the consomme, broth, sherry, Worcestershire, soy, and water. Bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, to develop the flavors. Add more water if it starts to evaporate too much. Pour the liquid through a fine mesh strainer and reserve both the liquid and the onions. 

    Slice the beef very thin. Pile meat and onions on rolls, then serve with dishes of jus.

    “Delicious, fragrant, salsy, tangy herbs with spices-and you say appetize-her?…”



    Image: valentines cartoons

    Notably, the French lay claim to fame of all hors d’oeuvres (hint: odor-herbs or o’dor’herbs) food/s.

     

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    3 responses to “Mimicking a romantic language… the borrowed word: “FRENCH” in a culinary dip

    1. bluewillowcottage

      May 5, 2017 at 10:55 am

      How interesting! I can’t wait to try this dip!

      Liked by 1 person

       
    2. OIKOS™-Redaktion

      May 5, 2017 at 12:56 pm

      Also with garlic! We love it. ;-) Have a nice weekend, sunny too, if you are not in Canada or Germany. We got the rain of the rest of the world. ;-) Michael

      Like

       
    3. America On Coffee

      May 6, 2017 at 7:03 pm

      (:

      Liked by 1 person

       

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