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“Potato Soufflé Recipe” 

10 Mar

A soufflé (French: [su.fle]) is a baked egg-based dish which originated in early eighteenth century France. It is made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to breathe” or “to puff”.[1][2][3]

History
The earliest mention of the soufflé is attributed to French master cook Vincent de la Chapelle, circa the early eighteenth century.[1] The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century.[4][5]

Ingredients and preparation 

A berry soufflé served in a coffee cup

Soufflés are typically prepared from two basic components:
a flavored crème pâtissière,[6] cream sauce or béchamel,[6] or a purée[2][6] as the base egg whites beaten to a soft peak[2]

The base provides the flavor and the egg whites provide the “lift”, or puffiness to the dish.[1][2] Foods commonly used to flavor the base include herbs, cheese and vegetables[1] for savory soufflés and jam,[7] fruits,[8] berries,[9] chocolate,[10] banana[11] and lemon[12] for dessert soufflés.

Soufflés are generally baked in individual ramekins of a few ounces or soufflé dishes[13] of a few liters: these are typically glazed, flat-bottomed, round porcelain containers with unglazed bottoms, vertical or nearly vertical sides, and fluted exterior borders. The ramekin, or other baking vessel, may be coated with a thin film of butter to prevent the soufflé from sticking.[6] Some preparations also include adding a coating of sugar, bread crumbs, or a grated hard cheese such as parmesan inside the ramekin in addition to the butter; some cooks believe this allows the soufflé to rise more easily.[6]

After being cooked, a soufflé is puffed up and fluffy,[2] and it will generally fall after 5 or 10 minutes (as risen dough does). It may be served with a sauce atop the soufflé, such as a sweet dessert sauce.[14][15][16] When served, the top of a soufflé may be punctured with serving utensils to separate it into individual servings.[17] This can also enable a sauce to integrate into the dish.

Soufflés prepared in ramekins
Lemon soufflé

Cheese souffle

A soufflé at a Japanese restaurant
Variations;

There are a number of both savory and sweet soufflé flavor variations.[18] Savory soufflés often include cheese, and vegetables such as spinach,[2] carrot[19][20] and herbs, and may sometimes incorporate poultry, bacon, ham, or seafood for a more substantial dish. Sweet soufflés may be based on a chocolate or fruit sauce (lemon or raspberry, for example), and are often served with a dusting of powdered sugar.[21] Frugal recipes sometimes emphasize the possibilities for making soufflés from leftovers.[22]
Another variation is an ice cream soufflé, which combines a soufflé with ice cream.[23] Fruit or a hot dessert sauce, such as chocolate sauce, may also be used.[16]

Soufflé variations
A large cheese soufflé prepared in a casserole dish

A soufflé served with ice cream

A sweet potato soufflé

A chocolate soufflé with lava centre served with ice cream

See also In popular culture 
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souffl%C3%A9

 
4 Comments

Posted by on March 10, 2017 in breakfast, brunch, FRENCH FRIDAYS

 

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4 responses to ““Potato Soufflé Recipe” 

  1. mcchustlers

    March 13, 2017 at 6:10 am

    Is Vincent de la Chapelle and ancestor of Dave Chappelle?

    Liked by 1 person

     
  2. America On Coffee

    March 13, 2017 at 8:20 am

    Doubt it. Last names are different.

    Like

     
  3. allaboutme31

    March 14, 2017 at 4:59 am

    Can’t wait to try it!

    Like

     
  4. America On Coffee

    March 14, 2017 at 9:11 pm

    :)

    Liked by 1 person

     

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