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“Polk Salad Annie” by Tony Joe White.

29 Aug

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“Polk Salad Annie” is a 1968 song written and performed by Tony Joe White.[1] It was recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Its lyrics describe the lifestyle of a poor rural Southern girl and her family. Traditionally, the term to describe the type of food highlighted in the song is polk or poke sallet, a cooked greens dish made from pokeweed.[2] Its 1969 single release peaked at Number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100. In Canada, the song made #10 on the RPM Magazine Hot Singles chart.

Song
The song vividly recreates the Southern roots of White’s childhood and his music reflects this earthy rural background. As a child he listened not only to local bluesmen and country singers but also to the Cajun music of Louisiana, that rare hybrid of traditional musical styles introduced by French settlers at the turn of the century.

His roots lie in the swamplands of Oak Grove, Louisiana, where he was born in 1943. Situated just west of the Mississippi River, it’s a land of cottonfields, where pokeweed, or “polk” grows wild, and alligators lurk in moss-covered swamps. “I spent the first 18 years of my life down there,” said White. “My folks raised cotton and corn. There were lotsa times when there weren’t too much to eat, and I ain’t ashamed to admit that we’ve often whipped up a mess of polk sallet. Tastes alright too.. a bit like spinach.”[3]

Sallet is an old English word that means “cooked greens,”[4] not to be mistaken for “salad”; in fact, a great many cases of pokeweed poisoning result from this linguistic mistake.[citation needed] While it may be that record companies labeled the song “salad,” the dish in question was a “sallet” made of pokeweed.[citation needed]

Tony Joe White (born July 23, 1943, Oak Grove, Louisiana, United States) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, best known for his 1969 hit “Polk Salad Annie” and for “Rainy Night in Georgia”, which he wrote but was first made popular by Brook Benton in 1970. He also wrote “Steamy Windows” and “Undercover Agent for the Blues”, both hits for Tina Turner in 1989; those two songs came by way of Turner’s producer at the time, Mark Knopfler, who is a friend of White. “Polk Salad Annie” was also recorded by Elvis Presley and Tom Jones.

Biography
Tony Joe White was the youngest of seven children who grew up on a cotton farm near Oak Grove, Louisiana. He first began performing music at school dances, and after graduating from high school he performed in night clubs in Texas and Louisiana.[1]

1960s–1970s
In 1967, White signed with Monument Records, which operated from a recording studio in the Nashville suburb of Hendersonville, Tennessee, and produced a variety of sounds, including rock and roll, country and western, and rhythm and blues. Billy Swan was his producer.

Over the next three years, White released four singles with no commercial success in the U.S., although “Soul Francisco” was a hit in France. “Polk Salad Annie” had been released for nine months and written off as a failure by his record label, when it finally entered the U.S. charts in July 1969. It climbed to the Top Ten by early August, and eventually reached No. 8, becoming White’s biggest hit.

White’s first album, 1969’s Black and White,[2] was recorded with Muscle Shoals/Nashville musicians David Briggs, Norbert Putnam, and Jerry Carrigan, and featured “Willie and Laura Mae Jones” and “Polk Salad Annie”, along with covers of Jimmy Webb’s “Wichita Lineman”. “Willie and Laura Mae Jones” was covered by Dusty Springfield on her album Dusty in Memphis also recorded in 1969.

Three more singles quickly followed, all minor hits, and White toured with Steppenwolf, Sly & the Family Stone, Creedence Clearwater Revival and other major rock acts of the 1970s, playing in France, Germany, Belgium, Sweden and England.

In 1973, White appeared in the film Catch My Soul, a rock-opera adaption of Shakespeare’s Othello. White played and sang four and composed seven songs for the musical.

In late September 1973, White was recruited by record producer Huey Meaux to sit in on the legendary Memphis sessions that became Jerry Lee Lewis’s landmark Southern Roots album.[citation needed] By all accounts,[citation needed] these sessions were a three-day, around-the-clock party, which not only reunited the original MGs (Steve Cropper, Donald “Duck” Dunn and Al Jackson, Jr. of Booker T. and the MGs fame) for the first time in three years, but also featured Carl Perkins, Mark Lindsay (of Paul Revere & the Raiders), and Wayne Jackson plus The Memphis Horns.

en.m.Wikipedia.org

 

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4 responses to ““Polk Salad Annie” by Tony Joe White.

  1. camellia's cottage

    August 29, 2016 at 8:46 pm

    There’s nothing like that Muscle Shoals Sound! My home is Alabama and I can attest that there is something about Muscle Shoals that does something wonderful to the sound! great post!

    Liked by 1 person

     
  2. America On Coffee

    September 4, 2016 at 4:47 pm

    It’s a song, indeed, which reflects on the American roots. And too, it gives a beautiful southern feel! Thanks very much for your shared perspective, camellia’s cottage! :)

    Liked by 1 person

     
  3. camellia's cottage

    September 4, 2016 at 5:31 pm

    Than you! my husband is the guitarist/musician here- he loved the Tony Joe recording… And believe it or not, we have eaten poke salat! thanks for stopping by! look forward to more good posts from you!

    Liked by 1 person

     
  4. rockalot1

    September 6, 2016 at 11:47 am

    Love this song!!!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

     

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