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Roy Head – “Treat Her Right ” – 1965

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I wanna tell you a story
Every man oughta know
If you want a little lovin’
You gotta start real slow
She’s gonna love you tonight now
If you just treat her right now

Squeeze her real gentle
Gotta make her feel good
Tell her that you love her
Like you know you should
So if you don’t treat her right
She won’t love you tonight

If you practice my method
Just as hard as you can
You’re gonna get a reputation
As a lovin’ man
And you’ll be glad every night
That you treated her right

Roy Kent Head (born January 9, 1941 in Three Rivers, Texas) is an American singer, best known for his hit “Treat Her Right.”

Career

Head achieved fame as a member of a musical group out from San Marcos, Texas known as The Traits. The group’s sponsor landed their first recording contract in 1958 with TNT Music in San Antonio while they were still in high school. The Traits performed and recorded in the rockabilly, rock and roll and rhythm and blues musical styles from the late 1950s to the mid-1960s. Though landing several regional hits between 1959 and 1963 on both the TNT and Renner Record labels, Head is best known for the 1965 blue-eyed soul international hit, “Treat Her Right” released by Roy Head and the Traits. After going solo, Head landed several hits on the Country and Western charts between 1975 and 1985. During his career of some 50 years, he has performed in several different musical genres and used a somewhat confusing array of record labels, some too small to provide for national marketing and distribution. Roy Head and the Traits held reunions in 2001 and 2007 and were inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame in 2007. One of the most gifted performers of his era, Head’s extraordinary dancing and acrobatic showmanship are legendary, often compared to the likes of Elvis Presley or James Brown.[citation needed]

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“NA NA HEY HEY KISS HIM GOODBYE”

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“Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye”

is a song written and recorded by Paul Leka, Gary DeCarlo and Dale Frashuer, attributed to a then-fictitious band they named “Steam”. It was released under the Mercury subsidiary label Fontana and became a number one pop single on the Billboard Hot 100 in late 1969, and remained on the charts in early 1970.[1] In 1977, Chicago White Sox organist Nancy Faust began playing the song when White Sox sluggers knocked out the opposing pitcher. The fans would sing and a sports ritual was born.The song’s chorus remains well-known, and is still frequently used as a crowd chant at many sporting events generally directed at the losing side in an elimination contest when the outcome is all but certain or when an individual player is ejected or disqualified.

    Covers and subsequent popularity

The original recording of “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” has been released in many collections of oldies songs and recorded by other groups.

The Supremes included a cover of the song on their 1970 album New Ways but Love Stays.

Dave Clark & Friends released the song in October 1973 under the title “Sha-Na-Na-Na (Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye)” (EMI 2082),but the single didn’t chart.

In February 1983, UK girl group Bananarama released the song as a single from their album Deep Sea Skiving. This version became a top ten hit in the United Kingdom (#5), but only a minor hit in the US (Billboard #101) later that year.[citation needed]

In 1987, Canadian quartet The Nylons released an a cappella version of this song as a single under the shortened title “Kiss Him Goodbye”. It became their biggest hit on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number twelve that summer.[4] Nigerian Reggae artist Majek Fashek sampled the chorus for the song “Free Africa, Free Mandela”.

In 2009, Kristinia DeBarge heavily sampled “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” in her debut single “Goodbye.” The song would eventually reach the top 20 of the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #15.

In 2009, American rapper Wale sampled the chorus line of the song in his single Chillin. The song peaked at #99 on the US Billboard Hot 100.[5]

In 2014 the Norwegian artist Adelén used the chorus line of the song on her World Cup song “Olé.” The song was one of the tracks on the One Love, One Rhythm – The 2014 FIFA World Cup Official Album. The song peaked at number #3 in Norway.

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“Voice Your Choice – The Radiants”

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The Radiants were known as an American doo-wop and R&B group popular in the 1960s.

The group formed in Chicago, Illinois, in 1960, where its members met singing in the youth choir of Greater Harvest Baptist Church. They performed both gospel and secular tunes, the latter of which were written by leader Maurice McAlister. While attempting to land a record deal, they found that labels weren’t interested in gospel groups anymore, and concentrated on secular tunes, eventually landing a deal with Chess Records. Billy Davis produced their early records, including the first, “Father Knows Best” b/w “One Day I’ll Show You”, which was a regional hit in Cleveland in 1962.

Several more singles for Chess followed, but didn’t sell well, and by 1964 the group had more or less broken up. McAlister and baritone Wallace Sampson continued on as a trio with new member Leonard Caston, Jr. (son of Leonard Caston). With this lineup they had their biggest hit, 1964’s “Voice Your Choice”. The follow-up, “Ain’t No Big Thing”, was also a hit.

Caston left the group in 1965, replaced by James Jameson. This lineup recorded only one single, “Baby You Got It”, before McAlister departed. At this time, Chess had another group, The Confessions, led by Mitchell Bullock, on its roster, who had recorded the single “Don’t It Make You Feel Kinda Bad” but broken up before the album’s release. Billy Davis had Bullock join The Radiants with Sampson, Jameson, and Victor Caston, the younger brother of Leonard Jr.. The recording of “Don’t It Make You Feel Kinda Bad” made by The Confessions was then issued under The Radiants’ name in 1967.

This lineup produced one more hit single, “Hold On”, and after several more failed singles the group was dropped by Chess in 1969. They continued to perform together through 1972. McAlister and tenor Green McLauren also recorded as Maurice & Mac.

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1965 cover of Voice Your Choice by the Fortunes

The Fortunes are an English harmony beat group. Formed in Birmingham, the Fortunes first came to prominence and international acclaim in 1965, when “You’ve Got Your Troubles” broke into the US and UK Top 10s. Afterwards, they had a succession of hits including “Here It Comes Again” and “Here Comes That Rainy Day Feeling Again”; continuing into the 1970s with more globally successful releases such as “Storm in a Teacup” and “Freedom Come, Freedom Go”.

In 1966, their manager, Reginald Calvert, was shot to death in a dispute over pirate radio stations.

 

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“Bob Dylan- Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door “Original”

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“Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” is a song written and sung by Bob Dylan, for the soundtrack of the 1973 film Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. Released as a single, it reached #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. Described by Dylan biographer Clinton Heylin as “an exercise in splendid simplicity,”[1] the song, measured simply in terms of the number of other artists who have covered it, is one of Dylan’s most popular post-1960s compositions.

Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.[2]

Storyline and song structure

The song describes the collapse of a deputy sheriff; dying from a bullet wound, he tells his wife “Mama, take this badge off of me; I can’t use it anymore.” The song consists of four chords in the key of G major: G, D, Am7, and C. The basic pattern throughout the song is G-D-Am7-Am7 and then G-D-C-C, and this is repeated. Over the years, Dylan has changed the lyrics, as have others who have performed this song.

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Blondie – Heart Of Glass

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Heart of Glass” is a song by American new wave band Blondie, written by singer Debbie Harry and guitarist Chris Stein. Featured on the band’s third studio album, Parallel Lines (1978), it was released as the album’s third single in January 1979 and topped the charts in several countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom.

In December 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the song number 255 on its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.[3] It was ranked at number 259 when the list was updated in April 2010.[4] Slant Magazine placed it at number 42 on their list of the greatest dance songs of all time.[5]

Currently, “Heart of Glass” is ranked no. 56 in the UK’s official list of biggest selling singles of all-time with sales of 1.3 million copies.[6]

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“If I Could Build My Whole Around You -MARVIN GAYE AND TAMMI TERRELL”

 

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“Sam Cooke – A Change Is Gonna Come”

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Samuel “Sam” Cooke
(January 22,1931 – December11,1964)
was an American recording artist and singer-songwriter, generally considered among the greatest of all time.

Influential as both a singer and composer, he is commonly known as the King of Soul for his distinctive vocals and importance within popular music. His pioneering contributions to soul music contributed to the rise of Aretha Franklin, Bobby Womack, Al Green, Curtis Mayfield, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Billy Preston and popularized the likes of Otis Redding and James Brown. AllMusic biographer Bruce Eder wrote that Cooke was “the inventor of soul music”, and possessed “an incredible natural singing voice and a smooth, effortless delivery that has never been surpassed.”

Cooke had 30 U.S. top 40 hits between 1957 and 1964, plus three more posthumously. Major hits like “You Send Me”, “A Change Is Gonna Come”, “Cupid”, “Chain Gang”, “Wonderful World”, and “Twistin’ the Night Away” are some of his most popular songs. Cooke was also among the first modern black performers and composers to attend to the business side of his musical career. He founded both a record label and a publishing company as an extension of his careers as a singer and composer. He also took an active part in the Civil Rights Movement.

On December 11, 1964, at the age of 33, Cooke was fatally shot by Bertha Franklin, the manager of the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles, California. After an inquest, the courts ruled Cooke’s death to be a justifiable homicide. Since that time, the circumstances of his death have been consistently called into question by Cooke’s family and his wide circle of friends and acquaintances.

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Sam Cooke – A Change Is Gonna Come:

 

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