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“SHORTY LONG – CHANTILLY LACE”

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Frederick Earl “Shorty” Long (May 20, 1940 – June 29, 1969) was an American soul singer, songwriter, musician, and record producer for Motown’s Soul Records imprint. He was inducted into the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame in 1980.

Career
Born in Birmingham, Alabama, Long came to Motown in 1963 from the Tri-Phi/Harvey label, owned by Berry Gordy’s sister, Gwen, and her husband, Harvey Fuqua. His first release, “Devil with the Blue Dress On” (1964), written with William “Mickey” Stevenson, was the first recording issued on Motown’s Soul label, a subsidiary designed for more blues-based artists such as Long. While this song never charted nationally, the song was covered and made a hit in 1966 by Mitch Ryder and The Detroit Wheels. Long’s 1966 single “Function at the Junction” was his first popular hit, reaching #42 on the national R&B charts. Other single releases included “It’s a Crying Shame” (1964), “Chantilly Lace” (1967), and “Night Fo’ Last” (1968).

Long’s biggest hit was “Here Comes the Judge” which in July 1968 reached number four on the R&B charts and number-eight on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was inspired by a comic act on Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In about a judge by Pigmeat Markham, whose own “Here Comes the Judge” – a similar song with different lyrics – charted three weeks after Long’s, also in July 1968, and reached number 19 on Billboard. Long’s 1969 singles included “I Had a Dream” and “A Whiter Shade of Pale”. He released one album during his lifetime, Here Comes the Judge (1968).

Long played many instruments, including piano, organ, drums, harmonica, and trumpet. He acted as an MC for many of the Motortown Revue shows and tours, and co-wrote several of his tunes (“Devil with the Blue Dress On”, “Function at the Junction”, and “Here Comes the Judge”). Long was the only Motown artist besides Smokey Robinson who was allowed to produce his own recordings in the 1960s. Marvin Gaye, in David Ritz’s biography Divided Soul: The Life & Times of Marvin Gaye, described Shorty Long as “this beautiful cat who had two hits, and then got ignored by Motown.”[1] Gaye claimed he “fought for guys like Shorty” while at Motown, since no one ever pushed for these artists. When Holland-Dozier-Holland came to Gaye with a tune, he stated, “Why are you going to produce me? Why don’t you produce Shorty Long?”[1]

Death
On June 29, 1969, Long and a friend drowned when their boat capsized on the Detroit River in Michigan.[2] Stevie Wonder played the harmonica at his burial, and placed it on his casket afterwards. Writer Roger Green’s epitaph stated: “So there endeth the career of a man who sang what he wanted to sing – everything from the blues to romantic ballads, from wild and crazy numbers to a utopian vision of Heaven on Earth. Short in stature but big in talent, he entertained and amazed us, and finally he inspired us.” [3]

Motown issued Long’s final album, The Prime of Shorty Long, shortly after his death.

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Pumpernickel Gypsy Toast

Pumpernickel Gypsy Toast

By: visualdebris (wordpress.com)

I made some Gypsy Toast (aka French Toast) with my favorite bread today then decided to research it. After some googling and wiki’ing and ask’ing, I made an interesting discovery. The oldest known recipe for this lovely and easy breakfast (or lunch or dinner) dish is found in an old Roman manuscript from the 4th century. It is a book of recipes and may have been compiled as early as in the time of Tibirius. Wow. That really gave me goose bumps. I have to wonder what kind of bread they used. I’ll save that for another morning of googling, wiki’ing, and ask’ing.

It should really be called Roman Toast.

Ingredients

  1. Pumpernickel bread, 4 slices
  2. Eggs, 2
  3. Milk, 1/3 cup
  4. Canola oil, two tbsp
  5. Sugar-free sweetener, 2 packets (or honey or sugar…)
  6. Cinnamon, pinch
  7. Nutmeg, pinch
  8. Lemon, juice of 1/2
  9. Confectioners sugar to sprinkle on top

Preparation

Whip the eggs, milk, sweetener, and spices together. Soak the bread slices in the egg mixture for two minutes, turning over halfway.

Heat the oil in a frying pan or griddle on high until hot.

Put the soaked slices of bread in the frying pan and turn the heat down to half. Cook about 30 seconds on each side or until egg mixture on the bread is lightly browned on either side.

Remove from pan, sprinkle lemon juice and confectioners sugar on top and serve.

Source: http://www.beachdebris.com

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2018 in music

 

“The Moody Blues – Nights In White Satin [Original Footage] (1967)”

The Moody Blues – Nights In White Satin [Original Footage] (1967):

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The Moody Blues are an English rock band. Among their innovations was a fusion with classical music, as heard in their 1967 album Days of Future Passed.

The Moody Blues have sold more than 55 million albums worldwide [1] and have been awarded 18 platinum and gold discs. As of 2015 they remain active with one member from the original 1964 band (drummer Graeme Edge) and two more from the 1966 lineup (bassist John Lodge and guitarist Justin Hayward).

Founding and early history

Early years, Decca Records 1964–1966

The Moody Blues formed on 4 May 1964, in Erdington, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Ray Thomas, a juvenile John Lodge and (occasionally) Mike Pinder had been members of El Riot & the Rebels. They disbanded when Lodge, the youngest member, went to technical college and Pinder joined the army. Pinder then rejoined Thomas to form the Krew Cats. Back from a disappointing spell in the Hamburg region a few months later, the pair recruited guitarist/vocalist Denny Laine, band manager-turned-drummer Graeme Edge and bassist Clint Warwick. The five appeared as the Moody Blues for the first time in Birmingham in 1964. The name developed from a hoped-for sponsorship from the M&B Brewery which failed to materialise, the band calling themselves both “The M Bs” and “The M B Five” and was also a subtle reference to the Duke Ellington song, “Mood Indigo”. Around this time the band were the resident group at the Carlton Ballroom, later to become rock music venue Mothers on Erdington High Street.

Soon, the band obtained a London-based management company, ‘Ridgepride’, formed by ex-Decca A&R man Alex Murray (Alex Wharton), who helped them land a recording contract with Decca Records in the spring of 1964. Initially they were signed to a management company who then leased their recordings to Decca. They released a single, “Steal Your Heart Away”, that year which failed to chart. The Moody Blues appeared on the cult TV programme Ready Steady Go! singing the uptempo ‘B’ side “Lose Your Money (But Don’t Lose your Mind)”. But it was their second single, “Go Now” (released later that year), which really launched their career, being promoted on TV with one of the first purpose-made promotional films in the pop era, produced and directed by Alex Wharton. The single became a hit in Britain (where it remains their only Number 1 single) and in the United States, where it reached No.10. The band encountered management problems after the chart-topping hit and subsequently signed to Decca Records in the UK (London Records in the US) as actual recording artists. A four track extended play release titled: “The Moody Blues” featuring both sides of their first two Decca singles was issued in a colour picture sleeve in early 1965.

Their debut album The Magnificent Moodies, produced by Denny Cordell with a strong Merseybeat/R&B flavour, was released on Decca in mono only in 1965. It contained the hit single together with one side of classic R&B covers, and a second including four Laine/Pinder originals.

Alex Wharton left the management firm and the group released a series of relatively unsuccessful singles. They enjoyed a minor British hit with a cover of “I Don’t Want To Go on Without You” (No. 33) in February 1965, while the Pinder-Laine original “From the Bottom of My Heart (I Love You)” produced by Denny Cordell (with a vocal choral sound towards the conclusion that anticipated their later more famous vocal sound on “Nights in White Satin”) was issued as a UK single in May 1965 and did a little better (No. 22). But then “Everyday”, another Pinder-Laine song, stalled at No. 44 in October 1965 and no further British singles were released for just about a year. The group was still in demand for live gigs, though, and they did have some chart success in the U.S. and in Europe during those months when “Bye Bye Bird” (Decca AT 15048) was lifted from their album in December 1965 as an overseas single charting in France (No. 3).

In June 1966, Warwick retired from the group and the music business. He was briefly replaced by Rod Clark (born Rodney Clark, 23 November 1942, Surlingham, near Norwich, Norfolk), but in early October, Denny Laine also departed from the group, which made Decca release “Boulevard de la Madeleine” c/w “This is My House (But Nobody Calls)” (Decca F 12498, 1966) only a few days later, as The Moody Blues seemed to be disintegrating. Clark joined the Rockin Berries.

In the November Issue of Hit Week, Dutch interviewers Hans van Rij and Emie Havers presented their story saying The Moody Blues had been in the process of recording their second album, Look Out, with Cordell producing. The album was not to be and “Really Haven´t Got the Time” (released as a single c/w “Fly Me High” some months later) is the only song mentioned in the article but the authors say Laine had written all of the material, with Thomas, Pinder and Clark (still the bass player) singing lead vocals as well.

en.m.wikipedia.org

A final ‘Mark One’ Moodies single, Pinder-Laine’s “Life’s Not Life”, was scheduled for release in January 1967 (Decca F 12543) c/w “He Can Win” even though Laine couldn´t because the group had relaunched themselves without him months ago. (This single’s release is often listed as being cancelled; however, both promo and regular stock copies have been seen over the years).

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2018 in music, ballad, male vocal group

 

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“1 – 2 – 3” – Len Barry

“1 – 2 – 3” – Len Barry

1 – 2 – 3” is a 1965 song recorded by American blue-eyed soul singer Len Barry, who co-wrote the song with John Medora and David White. The recording’s chorus and accompaniment were arranged by Jimmy Wisner. The single was released in 1965 on the American Decca label. The writers were sued by Motown Records at the time, claiming that the song is a reworking of Holland-Dozier-Holland‘s “Ask Any Girl” released by The Supremes as the B-side to their single “Baby Love” the year before. They denied the claim, but after two years of litigation, agreed to give the Motown writers 15% of the song’s writing and publishing royalties. Holland-Dozier-Holland are listed as co authors by BMI.

The personnel on the original recording included Vinnie Bell, Bobby Eli, and Sal Ditroia on guitar, Joe Macho on bass, Artie Butler on percussion, Leon Huff on piano, Artie Kaplan on sax, Bill Tole and Roswell Rudd on trombone, Lee Morgan on trumpet, Fred Hubbard on clarinet, and Bobby Gregg on drums.[citation needed]

“1-2-3” reached number two in the US Billboard chart and number three on the UK Singles Chart. “1-2-3” also went to number 11 on the Billboard R&B chart. It sold over one and three quarter million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

It was also a Top 10 hit in both Australia, where it went to number seven, and in Ireland, where it went to number eight.

Wikipedia.org

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2018 in male vocalist, r&b

 

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“Diana Ross & The Supremes – Someday We’ll Be Together (with lyrics)”

“Diana Ross & The Supremes – Someday We’ll Be Together (with lyrics)”

Someday We’ll Be Together” is a song written by Johnny Bristol, Jackey Beavers, and Harvey Fuqua and made popular as the last of twelve American number-one pop singles for Diana Ross & the Supremes on the Motown label. Although it was released as the final Supremes song featuring Diana Ross, who left the group for a solo career in January 1970, it was recorded as Ross’ first solo single and Supremes members Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong do not sing on the recording. Both appear on the B-side, “He’s My Sunny Boy.”

The single topped the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart for one week. Reaching number-one on the American pop chart in the final 1969 issue of Billboard magazine (dated December 27),[2] the single was not only the final number-one in 12 chart-topping pop hits for The Supremes,[3] but it also holds the distinction of being the final American number-one hit of the 1960s.

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“Procol Harum ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale”

“Procol Harum ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale”

A Whiter Shade of Pale” is the debut single by the English rock band Procol Harum, released 12 May 1967. The record reached number one in the UK Singles Chart on 8 June 1967, and stayed there for six weeks. Without much promotion, it reached No. 5 on the US charts. One of the counterculture anthems of the 1967 Summer of Love, it is one of fewer than 30 singles to have sold over 10 million copies worldwide.
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“CYNDI LAUPER – Time After Time”

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“Time After Time” is a song by American singer-songwriter Cyndi Lauper. It was recorded by Lauper for her debut studio album, She’s So Unusual (1983), with Rob Hyman (co-writer and founding member of the rock band The Hooters) contributing backing vocals. The track was produced by Rick Chertoff and released as a single on January 27, 1984. It was the second single to be released from the album and became Lauper’s first #1 hit in the U.S. The song was written in the album’s final stages, after “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun”, “She Bop” and “All Through the Night” had been written. The writing began with the title, which Lauper had seen in TV Guide magazine, referring to the 1979 science fiction film Time After Time.

“Time After Time” is composed of simple keyboard-synth chords, bright, jangly guitars, clock-ticking percussion, and elastic bassline, and lyrically is a love song of devotion. Most music critics gave the song positive reviews, with most commending the song for being a solid and memorable love song, as well as considering the track Lauper’s best song. The song has been selected as one of the Best Love Songs of All Time by many media outlets, including Rolling Stone, Nerve, MTV and many others.[1] “Time After Time” was also nominated for a Grammy Award for Song of the Year at the 1985 edition.[2] The song was a success on the charts, becoming her first number-one single on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on June 9, 1984, and remaining there for two weeks. Worldwide, the song is her most commercially successful single, after “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”, and reached number three on the UK Singles Chart and number six on the ARIA Singles Chart. The song is also known for its numerous covers by a wide range of artists, including Miles Davis, who recorded an instrumental version for his 1985 album, You’re Under Arrest, and Eva Cassidy, whose cover of the song appears on her posthumous album of the same name. R&B singer Lil Mo also covered the song for her 2001 debut album Based on a True Story. An acoustic version was sung by Lauper with Sarah McLachlan on her 2005 album, The Body Acoustic.[3] Lauper has performed the song live with Patti LaBelle twice in 1985 and 2004 and with Sarah McLachlan at the American Music Awards of 2005,[4] as well as with rapper Lil’ Kim in 2009. The song has been featured numerous times in popular culture including the films Napoleon Dynamite, View From the Top, Strictly Ballroom, Up In the Air, John Tucker Must Die, Prom Night, Clockstoppers, Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, Sunny, Paranoia, Good Deeds, Nebraska, Irresistible, This Is Where I Leave You, Brown Sugar, and Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion as well as the television shows Cold Case, Stars in Their Eyes, Smallville, Veronica Mars, The Simpsons, The New Adventures of Old Christine, Ugly Betty, EastEnders, Accused, Parks and Recreation, Atop the Fourth Wall, Psych, Defiance, Grey’s Anatomy, Glee and My Name is Earl.

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