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Steamer Clams – How to Cook and Eat

How to make steamed soft shell clams, otherwise known as steamers, a specialty of New England.
Photography Credit: Elise Bauer

Steamers! Add these clams to the list of foods fun to eat. I was first introduced to steamers, or steamed soft shell clams, when I lived in Boston years ago.

Unlike hard shell clams (known here as quahogs, cherry stones, or little necks, depending on their size), steamers have rather thin, brittle shells, so you have to be gentle with them. The two sides of the shell don’t close all the way.

Instead, protruding from the shell is a long foot, or siphon. It’s what the clam uses to filter the sea water and eat. While hard shell clams stay close to the surface of the sea floor, steamer clams bury themselves more deeply, and extend their long siphons to the sea floor surface.

When you buy steamer clams, their siphons are mostly tucked away. But as soon as you soak them in (salted) water, the siphons start to come out, and out, and out.

When we made these the other day I think we measured one that was a good 4 inches long! (Could it be where the phrase, “happy as a clam” comes from?)

Anyway, soaking the steamers is a great way to freak out kids, though hopefully not so much as to dissuade them from eating them. Fortunately, my gang loves seafood. I just had to tell them they were like mussels, but with convenient handles for dipping into melted butter.

How to Cook and Eat Steamer Clams

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Yield: Serves 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 to 4 pounds of soft shell steamer clams
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted

METHODHIDE PHOTOS

1 Soak the steamers in sea water or salty water: Ideally, if you have the time, place the steamers in a bucket and cover with several inches of sea water or salty water (a tablespoon of sea salt completely dissolved in every quart of water), and let sit several hours in a cool place (not in direct sunlight), preferably overnight.

After a while, you’ll notice that each clam has a foot that will start to extend out of the shell. This is normal. The clams are usually buried in the sand with only the foot extending up to the surface of the water.

The steamer clams will discharge any sand or dirt while they are sitting in the water, so the water may become rather murky. You can change the water if you want.

If you don’t have time to let the clams soak for hours, just put several of them at a time in a large bowl, cover with salt water, and gently swirl the water around with your fingers for half a minute.

If the clams release sand or grit, dump out the water and rinse the clams out in the same manner again, until no more sand is released. (They may still release some sand and grit while cooking, but you will dip them in the clam broth before dipping them in butter when you eat them, helping to rinse away any remaining grit.)

2 Steam the clams: When ready to cook, put about an inch of water (you can also use beer or a stout) in the bottom of a tall, large pot. Place a steamer rack at the bottom of the pot. Carefully place the clams on the steamer rack (if you don’t have a steamer rack, don’t worry about it, just put the clams in the pot with the water).

The clam shells are on the thin side and can easily break, so be gentle as you put the steamers in the pot.

You may notice some of the clams “spitting” water at you as you handle them. This is normal, don’t worry about it. If any of the clams seem dead, are stinky, or whose siphons don’t retract a bit when you touch them, toss them out.

Cover the pot. Bring the water to a boil. Let the clams cook in the steam from the boiling water for about 5-10 minutes, until the steamer clam shells are wide open, then remove the pot from the heat. Any steamers that didn’t open should be discarded. (The pot might foam up and boil over while cooking, so keep an eye on it while cooking.) Let the clams cool for a couple minutes.

3 Place steamer water in bowls for serving: Carefully remove the cooked clams from the pot, placing them in a serving bowl. Do not discard the clam broth left in the pot. Instead pour a bit of the hot broth into bowls for serving. Put the melted butter into small bowls for dipping.

4 Serve with melted butter: Serve the steamers with a bowl for the clams, an empty bowl for the shells, a small bowl with broth for dipping, and a smaller bowl with butter for dipping.

5 Here’s how to eat the steamers: To eat, open the shell and remove the cooked clam. Use your fingers to pull off the skin covering the siphon of the clam. Discard with the shells into the shell bowl.

Grip the siphon with your fingers, swirl the clam around in the hot broth (it will help to warm up the clams and to dislodge any remaining grit or sand). Dip the clam into melted butter and eat!

Note, the siphon end of the clam may be a bit tough and rubbery. You can eat it or not. In any case, it makes a great handle for dipping.

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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-16T12:35:47+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 16 Nov 2018 12:35:47 +0000 31, in brunch

 

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“How to make a Coffee Alexander | Gin Recipe”

ORIGINALLY POSTED ON: BAREFEET BARISTAS ARE PEERK’D!

HOT COFFEE ALEXANDER

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-16T12:05:29+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 16 Nov 2018 12:05:29 +0000 31, in coffee

 

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French Onion Soup

RECIPE

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 5-6 large onions, finely sliced
  • salt and pepper
  • ½ tsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 2/3 cup apple cider OR red wine
  • 8 cups vegetable or beef broth
  • 2-3 sprigs fresh thyme baguette crostini or croutons
  • Gruyere cheese, grated

Directions

In a large Dutch oven or saucepot heat oil and butter over medium heat. Add onions and stir until they are well coated. Cover and cook onions for 15 minutes. Remove the lid and season the onions with salt, pepper and sugar. Cook the onions for an additional 30 minutes, stirring often. Onions should be deep golden brown. Once onions are caramelized stir in flour and cook for 1 minute. Add broth and fresh thyme and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 30 minutes. Ladle soup into individual, oven-safe bowls and top with crostini and cheese. Bake at 375°F until cheese is melted and bubbly. Serve hot fr

om the oven. Enjoy! YouTube.com

https://inspiredentertainment.com/rec

 
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“BETTYE SWANN – MAKE ME YOURS WITH LYRICS”

image

“Make Me Yours” is a 1967 song written by Bettye Swann (Betty Jean Champion) and produced by Arthur Wright,[1] which became a crossover hit for the Louisiana-born Swann. The single went to number one on the Billboard “Hot R&B” chart for two weeks in July 1967 and also peaked at number twenty-one on the pop singles chart.[2]

Betty Barton (born Betty Jean Champion; October 24, 1944), better known by the stage name Bettye Swann, is a retired American singer. She is best known for her 1967 hit song “Make Me Yours”.

She was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, one of 14 children. She grew up in Arcadia, Louisiana, and moved to Los Angeles, California in 1963. Although some sources state that she was in a vocal group known as The Fawns who recorded for Money Records in 1964, she has refuted this, saying that she sang with a trio in Arcadia by that name.[1]

In 1964, she started a solo singing career, changing her name to Bettye Swann at the prompting of local DJ Al Scott, who became her manager. After a minor hit with the self-penned “Don’t Wait Too Long”, her big breakthrough came with “Make Me Yours”, which topped the Billboard R&B charts in July 1967 and made #21 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] In 1968, she split with Scott, moved to Georgia, won a new contract with Capitol Records, and had another hit in 1969 with her cover of the Jeannie Seely hit “Don’t Touch Me” (#14 R&B, #38 Hot 100).

In 1972, she transferred to Atlantic Records and had a couple of minor hits with “Victim of a Foolish Heart” (later covered by Joss Stone) and Merle Haggard’s “Today I Started Loving You Again”. After leaving Money records she lived for a short time in Athens, Georgia.[1] She continued to record until the mid-1970s, but with little commercial success.
en.m.Wikipedia.org

 
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“Morning Coffee” Jesper Munk

Jesper was born in Munich as the son of Dane Helle Munk and the musician Rainer Germann (Marionetz, Cat Sun Flower). He started playing the guitar at the age of 15 and since 2010 plays in the band Lila’s Riot. After graduating from the Städtische Luisengymnasium Munich, he also began a solo career, performed on the street and regularly at the Fish’n Blues events of the Munich Glockenbach workshop in the Glockenbachviertel. The original street musician was discovered by music editors of Bayerischer Rundfunk.

On June 14, 2013, his debut album For My Way appeared. The album was played by Jesper Munk together with Lila’s Riot bandmate and drummer Clemens Finck von Finckenstein and his as advisor, bassist and co-producer Jesper Munk as Band also on stage performances. [6]

The ZDF called Jesper Munk in the context of a television appearance as “Germany’s hyped blues act” and the youth magazine Bravo saw him as the “only rediscovery” and added: In autumn 2013, Jesper Munk went on tour and to hear war on the show by Harald Schmidt, from now on more TV appearances in well-known shows. At the end of 2013 Jesper Munk toured as an opening act on Eric Burdon’s tour of Germany. [8th]

Jon Spencer, Mocky and Sepalot involved.

End of April 2018, the third studio album Munks came out at Warner Music Germany.

 
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“SPINNERS – Could It Be I’m Falling In Love”

image

You’re watching the official vinyl video for The Spinners – “Could It Be I’m Falling In Love” originally released by Atlantic Records on the 1972 album “Spinners”. This Philadelphia Soul classic peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1972-73.

RHINO is the official YouTube channel of the greatest music catalog in the world. Founded in 1978, Rhino is the world’s leading pop culture label specializing in classic rock, soul, and 80’s and 90’s alternative. The vast Rhino catalog of more than 5,000 albums, videos, and hit songs features material by Warner Music Group artists such as Van Halen, Duran Duran, Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, The Doors, Chicago, Black Sabbath, John Coltrane, Yes, Alice Cooper, Linda Ronstadt, The Ramones, The Monkees, Carly Simon, and Curtis Mayfield, among many others. Check back for classic music videos, live performances, hand-curated playlists, the Rhino Podcast, and more!

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-16T11:00:43+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 16 Nov 2018 11:00:43 +0000 31, in 1970s, male vocalist, soul oldies

 

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Amaretto Iced Coffee

Despite the known history on the introduction and acceptance of almonds into Italian cuisine, newer takes on the meanings and origins have been popularized by the two major brands. Though of sometimes questionable factuality, these tales hold a sentimental place in Saronno culture:

In 1525, a Saronno church commissioned artist Bernardino Luini, one of Leonardo da Vinci‘s pupils, to paint their sanctuary with frescoes. As the church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, Luini needed to depict the Madonna, but was in need of a model. He found his inspiration in a young widowed innkeeper, who became his model and (in most versions) lover. Out of gratitude and affection, the woman wished to give him a gift. Her simple means did not permit much, so she steeped apricot kernels in brandy and presented the resulting concoction to a touched Luini.

Amaretto (Italian for “a little bitter”) is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur associated with SaronnoItaly. Various commercial brands are made from a base of apricot pits, almonds, or both.[1]

Amaretto serves a variety of culinary uses, can be drunk by itself, and is added to other beverages to create several popular mixed drinks, as well as to coffee.

en.m.wikipedia.org

INGREDIENTS

 
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Posted by on FriAmerica/Los_Angeles2018-11-16T10:30:13+00:00America/Los_Angeles11bAmerica/Los_AngelesFri, 16 Nov 2018 10:30:13 +0000 31, in coffee, Italiano (I Tell Ya I Know)

 

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